5
   

What to do if nobody wil hire?

 
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2018 11:13 am
One of the best questions you can ask in a job interview is: What are the objective metrics for success in this job after 3 months? (use a year if it's a long-term/permanent job)

Why? Because it shows you're thinking ahead to success and you are picturing yourself in the role. This often gets the interviewer to picture you in the role, too.
0 Replies
 
Sam560
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2018 04:22 pm
@neptuneblue,
Thanks man, this really helped!

I was thinking almost the exact same thing but KNEW I was missing something. You filled in all the blanks for me. Thank you so much!

I can't say for sure wether I'm doing something wrong or I've just had bad luck. People always said I'll have no trouble getting hired because I was pretty, or because I was aspiring to study in college to ern a certificate, etc... I never thought of it like that though.

I put in an application recently and may have an interview coming up in a few days, I'll update if all goes well!
Linkat
 
  3  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2018 07:50 pm
@Sam560,
Here is another thought ... if there has been a recent job you interviewed for and try to reach out to the interviewer and simply ask for feedback. You have nothing to lose at this point. Many people are very willing to help out. I, myself, had someone do this and I gave them very straight forward feedback. Not everyone will do this but if you get the right person they may tell you where you fell short.
Sam560
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2018 08:31 pm
@Linkat,
Really? I have thought about that. The last interview I went to was at a grocery store, and the position was for stocking the shelves and the dairy and cheese areas where they have a fancy cheese set up.

No previous work history or experience was required, and training was automatically given when hired.

I went in for an interview with the store manager who was a very nice older woman, and she asked all the standard questions, and said I was the first person she was interviewing for the position.

I answered all the questions as best I could and she said she'd call me the next day, but she never did.

I had experience that qualified me even though it wasn't required. And she was very nice and we shared a lot of laughs and she complimented me a lot on my looks, but she apparently decided to give someone else the job.

Is it really a good idea to go back and ask her why she never called? Or what I did wrong?

I initially thought she just forgot. It was a simple position that a school kid could work part time for extra money. It wasn't complicated at all. I don't think there were a bunch of sophisticated elements to analyze.


Linkat
 
  3  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 06:10 am
@Sam560,
Quote:
I answered all the questions as best I could and she said she'd call me the next day, but she never did.


She said she would call the next day? Why didn't you call the following day? If someone says they are going to call and they do not you should follow up. Even it they do not say they are going to call - you can always call back to ask if they made a decision. Simply call and say Hello I am following up on the interview from the other day. I am very interested in the position. Have you made a decision.

And yes, you can always ask for feedback if you do not get the job. Some people may not give you anything or feel comfortable about it, but many will. I wouldn't walk in and confront them - I would call them. If they are not there - leave a message for them. Like I said, someone did this for me once, I set up a time to speak with them over the phone and gladly gave them feedback. Not everyone will be helpful like that - but you might get lucky and have someone that will give you the time.
neptuneblue
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 06:17 am
@Sam560,
Sam560 wrote:
I went in for an interview with the store manager who was a very nice older woman, and she asked all the standard questions, and said I was the first person she was interviewing for the position.

I answered all the questions as best I could and she said she'd call me the next day, but she never did.


Let's just say, for example, that this manager had 20 interviewees come in one week. Since you were the first (on Monday), how would a manger remember you come Friday? By showing genuine interest, writing a thank you note and calling to check your status. I'm not saying make a pest of yourself but you have to show some sort of initiate to want the position more than another candidate.

Treat getting a job LIKE a job. Research the company, know basic facts like who owns it, when it opened and who the managers are. Go to Monster.com and read how to help yourself land a position you want. Other sites like Indeed.com, Snagajob, and local job boards on Facebook can be extremely helpful. Join LinkedIn and ask people you know to use them as contacts.

Brush up on basic math skills with online quizzes. Take timed typing tests and increase your typing speed. Use online tutorials for Microsoft Word, Excel & Powerpoint to use on applications under Special Skills. 10 key adding machine (data entry) skills are valuable especially if your keystrokes are in the 6000's.





Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 06:41 am
@neptuneblue,
Good points - and one big thing that many people do not do - simple - ask for the job. At the end of the interview - make it clear you are interested and want the job. Say something like - thank you very much for your time. I appreciate you explaining the position so thoroughly and I really like what you have to say. I am very interested in this position and would love working here.

Sometimes the small things count.

Even something as much as practicing your handshake and initial introduction - practice going up to someone smiling, looking them in the eye (not glaring) and a give a firm (not crushing handshake), saying nice to meet you Mr/Ms ___.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 07:17 am
To add, I know Linkat (don't know about neptuneblue, sorry) has interviewed and hired people. She is giving you advice from the other end and God, that's extremely valuable.

If you are looking in tech, to add to the sites neptune suggested, there's also Dice.com.

If you want to get some work experience you can also try freelancing with Upwork but note they are getting pickier.
0 Replies
 
Sam560
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 10:38 am
@Linkat,
I'm just shy that's all. I seriously considered calling back but ultimately I felt there was no point in doing it. I know you'll say I should've, and you're right.

I just don't like talking to people, that's all. Especially when it's something like a job interview or even just asking to apply. It's awkward when I do and always feel like I don't belong, and even if I "fake it" and act normal I still feel pretty shy inside.

I know I shouldn't interject my personal issues into this, I'm just saying that shaking hands/being friendly to try and get the job, presenting a resume and other qualifications are all things that feel extremely awkward and difficult for me. I tend to avoid social situations and don't like competing for something like a job. It's personally very stressful and intimidating.

I know I'm not the only one to feel this way, but I worry about the future sometimes since I sometimes feel I don't have what it takes, or that I can't do what's expected.



Linkat
 
  3  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 03:03 pm
@Sam560,
Practice, practice, practice. That is part of the reason I said as weird as it may sound - practice walking in, walking over to an imagery person and shaking their hand. Practice this movement in front of a mirror. I am serious.

When I was fresh out of college, I felt this way. I am more of an introvert so it is uncomfortable for me to get up in front of person and basically brag about myself. So after I did get my first real job, and worked a few years - I wanted to go in search of another position (due to the work environment where I was). I took out a book about preparing to get another job from the resume, cover letter and especially the interview. I prepared. I had answers to a variety of interview questions, I practiced how I would get there, how I would shake someone's hand, etc. I had a list of prepared questions. I brought this all in a professional looking portfolio with paper and the questions listed on it - along with some additional copies of my resume.

I prepared to the point I knew how I would sit in the reception area (some places will ask the receptionist about how you presented. I would also interview them (thus the list of questions). I built myself up so I was confident - I knew I had a certain set of skills - I was valuable same of the company. I looked at it this way - this is the one type of thing you get to actually brag about your accomplishments and those things that you do well in. Everyone has areas that they are strong in - you can BRAG about yourself and it is actually a positive thing to do in this situation. The more you practice, the better you get at it. Go with the attitude that you have skills they want - do you want them? Not over the top of course, but enough so you realize that you should be interviewing them to see if you want to work there as well.

Since then the only jobs I have been turned down for was only 2 - one it was obvious I was not the person they wanted due to the specific experience and the other was one that they were very close to offering me the position - to the point we were discussing compensation. I think I was too expensive for them.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  3  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 03:09 pm
@Sam560,
And I meant to add - don't beat yourself up for not calling back - but use it to learn from. And one thing that helped me get over my self-doubt - I just figured out what do I have to lose? If I don't get the job and they didn't like me - well I am not going to see them again so who cares?

Either that or picture the interviewer sitting on the toilet - it puts them in a vulnerable position rather than you. - kidding but not - if you realize that this person is just like anyone else with strengths and weaknesses and yes the need to use the toilet like anyone else, they seem a bit less intimidating.
Sam560
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 04:27 pm
@Linkat,
Thanks Linkat, your advice really helps! I feel a whole lot better. I never thought of it the way you put it.

I'll get an appropriate list together of answers to all of the standard questions and practice my response for when I'm asked.

I'll also think of it this way: I'm interviewing THEM to see if this is a good position I'd like to work in. Just like you said. And I'm sure it'll make it seem like I'm confident and have a passion to do to, and in turn it will make me look like someone they'd want to hire.

And as far as my shyness issues, I'll work around them one way or another. It's difficult to keep a conversation going and everything feels extremely awkward, but I'll try to work past it.


I guess there's nothing wrong with bragging about my achievements. It's just really awkward when they ask something like, "why do you want to work here?"

I could give the standard answer where I say it's because I'd like to contribute to the community and the company, but that's really awkward, but like I said I will find a way to work around the awkwardness.

Thanks again Linkat, your advice really helped me regain my confidence Smile

PS: and what should my attire be when I go for an interview? The obvious answer is don't wear casual clothing, but I don't really have any fancy dress shirts and ties. And I wouldn't look good in them either because I'm a girl, and I'm sort of a tomboy so I have no dresses or anything, but I do wear really nice flannel shirts, nice leather boots, and jeans(nice and new looking ones) so my attire isn't casual really but it's not super-fancy either. I could send you a picture if you'd like.

I was just curious as to if attire makes a big difference, and what kind of attire they like to see.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jun, 2018 04:58 pm
@Sam560,
Attire always, always, always makes a difference. It's a part of that first five seconds impression.

This is an awesome article by HuffPo about interviewing clothes for women:
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/diane-gottsman/job-interview-dress-tips_b_3569050.html
0 Replies
 
Ploxicle
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 28 Jun, 2018 12:05 am
@Sam560,
I havnt read the other replies so they might have already said this. What I try to do is go to public events and places where you can meet a lot of new people. Try to make friendly and eventually (faster than not) get one of them to reference you to the place they work at.
0 Replies
 
Sam560
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2018 02:21 pm
@Linkat,
Just an update if you all are interested: my latest application initially went in, but it doesn't look like I'm going to hear back from them. It was a grocery clerk position, no experience needed.

I applied again to a similar job yesterday so I'll see where that goes.

Thanks again for the support everybody ^^
0 Replies
 
 

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