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Life Expectancy Calculators

 
 
Seizan
 
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 10:05 pm
When I retired from the USAF in 1992 (age 38) I took several surveys from various life insurance companies (maybe 7 or 8 surveys). With my lifestyle as it was, they ALL indicated that I would most likely pass away between ages 60 to 65.

The positive thing that probably kept me going after retirement was that I taught karate classes 2 or 3 times a day, 5 or 6 times a week. But after the last class that day, I just wasted myself...

Without going into detail, I can say that my lifestyle consisted of drinking parties, poor sleeping habits, high stress, eating convenient fast-foods like fried chicken, pizza, burgers, etc., overindulgence in sweets, etc. I was single living overseas, so I had no family responsibilities or obligations.

Fortunately, I neither indulged in drug use nor smoked since my late teens (trying to look older and wiser by smoking a pipe for a couple of years).

In 1998 (age 45) I took up a new lifestyle philosophy and personal training routine, and underwent drastic changes in my living habits. No, I did not join a cult or any group of fanatics, I just made a choice to control things that previously controlled me. I stopped drinking alcohol “cold-turkey” but never felt a desire to drink since (I feared that since my father and grandfather were alcoholics, I would experience withdrawal, but it didn’t happen). I ate healthier foods, and ate out less often. I withdrew from the large group of “friends” who conditional friendship involved all my previous carousing indulgences.

In 1999 my lifestyle had changed so much that I married.

In 2002 (age 49) I took up steady employment teaching English at a local Okinawan middle school. Good recommendations each year have kept me going since then.

In 2005 I became a vegetarian. I eat mostly local produce (foods from the environment in which I live and am a part, like the local Okinawan centenarians).

In 2009 I reduced my sugar intake by about 75%.

In 2014 I reduced wheat gluten intake by about 90%.

Early this year (2018, age 64) I retook the insurance surveys (now on the Internet, and mostly the same companies), and was told I would likely reach age 91 (varied between 88 and 93).

For the new Japanese school year which began in April 2018, I had a complete medical exam (first complete exam since 1992). This is now mandatory because my employment status just changed from “local hire” to full government of Japan Employee Status. Med exam is required every year I am employed now (almost free). The doctor expressed surprise as he relayed the information he got from the tests and the x-ray -- everything normal, I had the test results he would expect to see from a man below age 30. He asked me what I did for work -- I told him I was an English teacher...

When I came home, I retook the insurance surveys, adding up-to-date info like blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. that I didn’t have at the beginning of the year. Barring accidents and such, my life expectancy is now calculated at 99 years. My wife's surveys indicated over 110...

Curiosity got to me, and I retook one of the more detailed surveys (not connected with an insurance company) and entered the old parameters from my carousing days. Using my old discarded lifestyle of stress, drinking, fast-food, etc. and my present age of 64, it gave me 15 more years of steadily declining health.

Statistics... Can't trust 'em, eh?
 
roger
 
  3  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 10:13 pm
@Seizan,
Well, of course. Once you reach age 64, you've a much better chance of reaching 65 than you did when you were 38.

Like George Burns once said, if you want to live to be a hundred, the first thing to do is make it to 99. I don't know if he made either, but that's what he said.
Seizan
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 10:19 pm
@roger,
I'm paraphrasing here, but on a talk show at age 90 George once told that when he was in his 50's his doctor told him he had to give up smoking cigars and drinking alcohol, or he wouldn't reach 80. The talk show host asked him "So what does your doctor say now?" George responded "I don't know. He's dead."
0 Replies
 
Seizan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 10:21 pm
@roger,
By the way, George lived to just over 100...

Born January 20, 1896.
Died March 9, 1996.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 11:29 pm
@Seizan,
He was never at a loss for words, was he?

Actually, he once said his job was to stand on stage and just repeat whatever Gracie said.
0 Replies
 
ekename
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 11:49 pm
@Seizan,
Quote:
When I came home, I retook the insurance surveys, adding up-to-date info like blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. that I didn’t have at the beginning of the year. Barring accidents and such, my life expectancy is now calculated at 99 years. My wife's surveys indicated over 110...


"Barring accidents and such", I'd expect you to live long and prosper.

If an actuarial table expects a 64 year old to live to 99 then they want you to buy their annuity. If an actuarial table expects a 64 year old to die tomorrow then they want you to buy their life insurance.

There are currently 95 supercentarians aged 111 or older so at least your wife would be expected to have some contemporaries amongst the 8 billion others.

roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2018 12:11 am
@ekename,
No, if an insurance company expects a 64 year old to die tomorrow, they surely do not want to sell him life insurance.
ekename
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2018 12:28 am
@roger,
Lol, true. They don't expect him to die for at least a year and a month. The tables are turned.
0 Replies
 
Seizan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2018 01:19 am
Actually, the survey that gave me a 99-y/o life expectancy was not related to an insurance company (the others were, and gave me a slightly lower age prediction). It was generated by the Boston University Medical Campus New England Centenarian Study:

http://www.bumc.bu.edu/centenarian/

You can take the calculator if you want, it's free. It is located in the menu on the right side of the front page of the site.

So far, it is the most detailed survey I've used, and ask the most questions. The more factors you can input, the more accurate the results will (may) be...
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2018 01:57 am
Being married extends the life expectancy of men.
And lowers it for women.

(I’m sure there’s a ton of jokes in that statistic.)

That probably factored in to your first dismal numbers.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2018 01:59 am
@PUNKEY,
Like, married men have nothing to live for?
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2018 10:32 pm
Some of longevity is due to size. The shorter you are, the longer you live. Applies to animals too.
0 Replies
 
ekename
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2018 11:40 pm
If there is no doubt that married men would live longer then surely, as a corollary, one must ask would they want to?
0 Replies
 
1800autopsy
 
  -4  
Reply Fri 31 May, 2019 11:34 pm
@Seizan,
Some of longevity is due to size. The shorter you are, the longer you live. Applies to animals too.
0 Replies
 
1800autopsy
 
  -3  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2019 02:03 am
@Seizan,
You can take the calculator if you want, it's free. It is located in the menu on the right side of the front page of the site.
0 Replies
 
 

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