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Wooden Spoons - death traps?

 
 
smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 01:17 pm
Loislane, that was...tres amusing... Very Happy
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 01:27 pm
I worked as a buthcher for a while years ago and we cut meat on these great big chopping tables , all wooden. At the end of the cutting day wed wash them with clorox and then water and then wed salt them down and leave them overnight.

We still use a great big chopping block at home. We use the same trick. The Clorox dissipates and is gone within an hour and the salt is just wiped with a clean paper towel , moist.

We should never fear our food.
We have a collection of wooden spoons on the wall in our pantry. The only reason we dont use them is that theyare worth more as antiques and we dont want them to get all splintery
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smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 01:36 pm
Wooden spoons just feel more user friendly, don't you think...more natural in the hand. Mixing a cake wouldn't feel 'right' without a wooden spoon. You can beat things really well...

I can't believe I'm going into raptures about wooden spoons Shocked
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mac11
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 03:42 pm
Smorgs, I know what you mean. My perfect wooden spoon is developing a crack (from being cleaned in the dishwasher hundreds of times) and it makes me very anxious! I'm going to have to break in a new one soon. Sad
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smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 04:01 pm
It will 'feel' new for ages :wink:
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 04:53 pm
If you have hand shaped wooden spoons and ladles and other wooden serving tools of years gone by, its a shame to use them since they are examples of craftsmanship that we dont see today. (The antiques collectors go nutsy over them also) Here in Lancaster County a recent auction featured wooden kitchen utensils and butter and springerle molds, and many of the chip carved spoons went for over 2 thousand dollars each, and the springerle molds could go as high as 5 or 6 K. AN ENGLISHMAN NEVER SELLS WHAT HE CAN USE < BUT A DUTCHMAN NEVER USES WHAT HE CAN SELL
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 07:17 pm
wooden implements should NEVER be put in the dishwasher ! as farmerman has pointed out, just wash them by hand, you don't even have to use chlorine. salt is an excellent cleaning material also, because bacteria cannot survive on salt. i read a little while ago that tests have shown that wooden implements are much safer to use than plastic utensils, because bacteria is more likely to survive on plastic than wood. apparently the wood draws away any moisture from bacteria - no moisture, no bacteria. hbg
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 07:21 pm
J_B wrote:
smorgs wrote:

Like I said to her:

"When did you last come down with the Ebola Virus?"


My sentiments exactly.

I also agree with Ossobuco:

Quote:
I don't understand so much fright about bacteria in general. Bacteria are all around us, and only a relative few are pathogenic. It's true that drippings from uncooked chicken, and some raw eggs could contain pathogens, but generally one cooks the chickens and the eggs, and washes the utensils that may have touched them fairly swiftly.


As a society we have become so paranoid about natural bacterias that we're sanitizing ourselves into huge increases in the number of asthma cases as well as the number of allergies. The fewer natural germs we expose ourselves to the easier it is to become sick.

*end of rant*

I use my 20 year old wooden spoons all the time.



I'm catching up on threads after I've come home from work, and am interjecting here before I've finished all the posts to say, yes, yes, I agree.
I have a degree in bacteriology from an ok place (UCLA) a long time ago. but I try to keep up, somewhat, re med issues. I think germ fear is out of hand, quite the moneymaking deal, and perhaps not wise re ecosystem and one's health. (I nod agreement with care for those who are immunedeficient via chemotherapy, etc.)
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 07:23 pm
WOODEN SPOONS
here is the article i was looking for (you have to scroll down a bit) : WOODEN CUTTING BOARDS
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 07:25 pm
WOODEN SPOONS
here is the article i was looking for (you have to scroll down a bit) : WOODEN CUTTING BOARDS
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 07:27 pm
wooden spoons
but this article claims that UNSCARRED PLASTIC implements are safer ! ?
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 07:30 pm
Pah! Grumble!

Escherichia coli and Staphyloccus aureus are long time body inhabitants. One particular E. coli is pathogenic and some staph are. If you or housemates are immune deficient, then be careful, but otherwise I see all this stuff as b.s., the fellow from Davis notwithstanding.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 07:32 pm
Oh, and do a swab of your skin and plate it...
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 07:50 pm
Why live a plastic life, good grief.

Ok, go ahead if you want to.

I'll send you some plastic strawberries..
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CowDoc
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2005 08:32 pm
As a veterinarian and a member of the local Board of Health, I can tell you all a couple of important things. It is true that sanitation is vital to public health, and I advocate all reasonable efforts to attain the standards of sanitations that have been established over the past four hundred years. I can also assure you that such ideas have been taken to extremes during the past century, and that overkill has become the rule. I personally have drunk from nearly every creek and irrigation ditch in central Idaho at some time or another, and have developed the Ironclad Rule of Water-Borne Disease: If you think the water (or the food) will make you sick, it ALWAYS will!!!
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2005 01:01 pm
cowdoc wrote : " If you think the water (or the food) will make you sick, it ALWAYS will!!! " . ... that's good advice. i think we all have at one time or other overridden our own advice (so freely given to others) and suffered the consequences. hbg
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smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2005 02:17 pm
I've decided to stick with the wooden spoons...and show the daughter this thread. :wink:
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2005 02:27 pm
One of the wooden spoons I use was given to me by mrs. hamburger when I left for university over 25 years ago. The spoon has acquired a lovely patina, carries memories of some great meals, and doesn't seem to have poisoned anyone yet. It will NEVER go in the dishwasher. Water, a bit of soap, sometimes a little salt. That's it.
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smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2005 02:46 pm
I know what you mean...I've got three, but there's only me that knows what they are used for:

The large dark one...curries, bolognese, chillie you know 'meaty,red things'

The small light 'new' 'bout five years old one: scrambled eggs, light sauces, custard, creme englais, bechemel etc

The heavy medium one with the more rounded shape: cakes, beating etc...

Do you know what I mean? You just naturally reach for the right spoon for the job. :wink:
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