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Global Warming...New Report...and it ain't happy news

 
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2022 07:09 am

Climate change is increasing the risk of a California megaflood
https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abq0995
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2022 08:26 am
Do you remember the people who found Greta Thunberg "hysterical"?

But despite the changed situation: many people still imagine themselves in a world that has long since ceased to exist. A stable world, with spring, summer, autumn and winter. Predictable, plannable.
Among them, unfortunately, are large parts of the political leadership.

‘The new normal’: how Europe is being hit by a climate-driven drought crisis

Europe drought: Images show extremely low water levels along Rhine River as officials warn transport of goods could be affected
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2022 02:32 am
Climate change is not only causing meadows to fade and gardens to wither.
The colourfulness of birds is also fading as a result of increasing global warming. Biologists from the University of the Basque Country and the French Centre for Evolutionary Research (CEFE) came to this conclusion in a long-term study with blue tits in southern France.

The American Naturalist (Volume 200, Number 1): Long-Term Decrease in Coloration: A Consequence of Climate Change?
Quote:
Abstract

Climate change has been shown to affect fitness-related traits in a wide range of taxa; for instance, warming leads to phenological advancements in many plant and animal species. The influence of climate change on social and secondary sexual traits, which are associated with fitness because of their role as quality signals, is, however, unknown. Here, we use more than 5,800 observations collected on two Mediterranean blue tit subspecies (Cyanistes caeruleus caeruleus and Cyanistes caeruleus ogliastrae) to explore whether blue crown and yellow breast patch colorations have changed over the past 15 years. Our data suggest that coloration has become duller and less chromatic in both sexes. In addition, in the Corsican C.c. ogliastrae, but not in the mainland C.c. caeruleus, the decrease is associated with an increase in temperature at molt. Quantitative genetic analyses do not reveal any microevolutionary change in the color traits over the study period, strongly suggesting that the observed change over time was caused by a plastic response to the environmental conditions. Overall, this study suggests that ornamental colorations could become less conspicuous because of warming, revealing climate change effects on sexual and social ornaments and calling for further research on the proximate mechanisms behind these effects.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2022 11:43 pm
The century of climate migration: why we need to plan for the great upheaval
Quote:
Agreat upheaval is coming. Climate-driven movement of people is adding to a massive migration already under way to the world’s cities. The number of migrants has doubled globally over the past decade, and the issue of what to do about rapidly increasing populations of displaced people will only become greater and more urgent. To survive climate breakdown will require a planned and deliberate migration of a kind humanity has never before undertaken.

The world already sees twice as many days where temperatures exceed 50C than 30 years ago – this level of heat is deadly for humans, and also hugely problematic for buildings, roads and power stations. It makes an area unliveable. This explosive planetary drama demands a dynamic human response. We need to help people to move from danger and poverty to safety and comfort – to build a more resilient global society for everyone’s benefit.

Large populations will need to migrate, and not simply to the nearest city, but also across continents. Those living in regions with more tolerable conditions, especially nations in northern latitudes, will need to accommodate millions of migrants while themselves adapting to the demands of the climate crisis. We will need to create entirely new cities near the planet’s cooler poles, in land that is rapidly becoming ice-free. Parts of Siberia, for example, are already experiencing temperatures of 30C for months at a time.

... ... ...
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2022 01:41 am
A couple rode thousands of miles to plot GPS image to raise awareness about climate crisis and encourage bike use.

Quote:
https://i.imgur.com/tErV6Ntl.jpg

Daniel Rayneau-Kirkhope and Arianna Casiraghi, accompanied by their dog, Zola, have just finished 4,500-mile (7,250km) bike ride across Europe to draw a giant GPS-plotted bicycle across seven countries to raise awareness of how cycling can help tackle the climate emergency. It is believed to be the world’s largest GPS drawing. You can see photos of their trip on their Instagram account.
Full report @ The Guardian
bulmabriefs144
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2022 07:25 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Omg, you have saved the world, by drawing a bicycle on a map!

Surely while you bike around, you aren't eating lots of grab and go irems and tossing plastic waste everywhere.
bulmabriefs144
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2022 07:31 am
@Walter Hinteler,
And there it is, the reason climate change is being pushed.

To justify people in the Middle East, Africa, and South America moving to Western countries. Along with justifying taxes for oue own air. Because surely they aren't moving to get away from increasingly despotic countries, it's because it's too hot!

Right... So Venezuela being a crappy place to live or Yemen or Saudi Arabia, that's not the reason, no it's too hot.

https://www.foxnews.com/media/elites-using-climate-emotional-excuse-control-everyone-newt-gingrich
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  5  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2022 08:43 am
@bulmabriefs144,
bulmabriefs144 wrote:
Omg, you have saved the world, by drawing a bicycle on a map!
Just for the record:
I copied and pasted from a linked report. I didn't draw a bicycle on a map (nor did I save the world, but I try to contribute my bite).
bulmabriefs144
 
  -4  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2022 08:51 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I see, so you couldn't even manage to draw a bicycle on a map. For shame.

MontereyJack
 
  3  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2022 09:43 pm
@bulmabriefs144,
dumb
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2022 02:09 am
@bulmabriefs144,
bulmabriefs144 wrote:
I see, so you couldn't even manage to draw a bicycle on a map.
Actually I never tried it.
But for my defence: I could not only draw/change seamarks on charts but even draw complete charts.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 03:40 am
Heatwave in China is the most severe ever recorded in the world

A long spell of extreme hot and dry weather is affecting energy, water supplies and food production across China

https://images.newscientist.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/23145221/SEI_120628506.jpg?width=778
The bed of the Jialing river is exposed in Chongqing, China

Quote:
Low rainfall and record-breaking heat across much of China are having widespread impacts on people, industry and farming. River and reservoir levels have fallen, factories have shut because of electricity shortages and huge areas of crops have been damaged. The situation could have worldwide repercussions, causing further disruption to supply chains and exacerbating the global food crisis.

People in large parts of China have been experiencing two months of extreme heat. Hundreds of places have reported temperatures of more than 40°C (104°F), and many records have been broken. Subway stations have set up rest areas where people can recover from the heat.

On 18 August, the temperature in Chongqing in Sichuan province reached 45°C (113°F), the highest ever recorded in China outside the desert-dominated region of Xinjiang. On 20 August, the temperature in the city didn’t fall below 34.9°C (94.8°F), the highest minimum temperature ever recorded in China in August. The maximum temperature was 43.7°C (110.7°F).

It is the longest and hottest heatwave in China since national records began in 1961. According to weather historian Maximiliano Herrera, who monitors extreme temperatures around the world, it is the most severe heatwave recorded anywhere.

“This combines the most extreme intensity with the most extreme length with an incredibly huge area all at the same time,” he says. “There is nothing in world climatic history which is even minimally comparable to what is happening in China.”

Together with the extreme heat, low rainfall in parts of China has led to rivers falling to low levels, with 66 drying up completely. In parts of the Yangtze, water levels are the lowest since records began in 1865. In a few places, local water supplies have run out and drinking water has had to be trucked in. On 19 August, China announced a national drought alert for the first time in nine years.

Hydroelectricity generation has fallen because of the low water levels. Sichuan has been especially affected because it normally gets 80 per cent of its electricity from hydropower. Thousands of factories in the province have had to cease operations because of electricity shortages amid high demand for air conditioning. Offices and shopping malls were also told to reduce lighting and air conditioning to save power.

In Sichuan alone, 47,000 hectares of crops are reported to have been lost and another 433,000 hectares damaged. The agriculture ministry has said it will try to increase rainfall by seeding clouds. It remains scientifically unclear whether cloud seeding makes a significant difference.

China is far from the only place affected by drought. Europe is having what may be its worst drought in 500 years. There is also a drought in the Horn of Africa, and across much of the US and Mexico.

Lower crop yields in these regions could worsen the global food crisis. Global food prices hit record levels even before Russia invaded Ukraine, and though they have fallen since March, they remain higher than in previous years. However, China has built up large grain reserves in recent years, so it can make up for some shortfall.

According to a 2021 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, droughts have been increasing as a result of global warming and will become more frequent and severe as the planet continues to warm.

newscientist
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 03:50 am
@hightor,
Hightor...

...what are the chances we have already reached the tipping point? Are there estimates given for that?
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 03:54 am

Dinosaur tracks from 113 million years ago uncovered due to severe drought in Texas
(cnn)

https://iili.io/rWkbQp.jpg
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 05:28 am
@Frank Apisa,
It's probably going to be more like multiple tipping points, some of them exacerbating the effects of others. We've probably crossed some lines already. There's such a long delay between any ameliorative actions we might take and their effect that it's difficult to see how we could turn it around.

bulmabriefs144
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 07:22 am
@hightor,
This talk of disruption in the water cycle. You need to get out of your little burroughs and see the world. In Arizona, the land is increasingly dry as a gulch. Meanwhile, people in LA water their lawns like crazy.

Guess what, it isn't that Arizona has a lack of water. They used to have plenty, as both Egypt and Arizona had a drought/flood cycle. Whenever it flooded, the land would become super-fertile. Both places built extensive dams, but we can see the effects of what was done afterwards with the water. Arizona conserved its water (even though I had a freaking dam filled with it nearby), having all sorts of rules for use. Meanwhile, California steals water from Arizona (and Utah) while playing the environmentalist virtue card.

On the other end of the spectrum, Egypt hoards water. The land nearby has become the Sahara desert.

There is a problem with your thinking. You have a poverty mindset. But actually, there is plenty of water to go around. And we can't "lose" water, we can only hoard it or steal it. All throughout the east coast, no such hoarding goes on. The east coast is fertile and green.

Evrn if the crap about water table was true, uhhhh we have the ability to desalinize water from the ocean. Not only that, we have the ability to seed clouds, and make rain come to areas that need it.

There isno excuse to hoard water. This is what has created shortages, water cut off from circulation.
0 Replies
 
bulmabriefs144
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 07:28 am
@Region Philbis,
Dinosaurs aren't Real
Quote:
The first thing you do when you go to someone's house is ask for the wifi network and password. For me, it's always amusing to watch the look on people's faces when they see that my family's wifi is called "Dinosaurs Aren't Real 5Gz."

Most kids have security blankets to cozy up with at night. Well, my little brother used to carry this giant plastic T. Rex around. At the age of 4, he was convinced that he would grow up to be one; that was his dream job. Abe, the T. rex. From daily games of Excavation (a spin-off of the game Operation) to the pterodactyl costume my brother wore every Halloween, I was constantly dealing with dinosaurs.

The only difference between the movies I watched as a kid about dragons or the ones about dinosaurs was the suspension of disbelief. Mockumentary about mermaids? Definitely not real, yet hilarious. But, dinosaurs wandering planet earth and befriending humans? That totally could have happened. Dinosaurs warranted credible documentaries, research, and an entire scientific field. The fictional stories were backed up by facts, and therefore people didn't see them as quite so fictional, after all.

Where was all of this information coming from? When I was in fourth grade, I did a research project on a subject of my choice. I got the opportunity to look into any subject that interested me. I decided to study paleontology. What I mean by this is that I literally read books about the study of paleontology. I didn't look for fossils or analyze their carbon levels, rather I looked up how scientists got their information.

What I learned was this: scientists don't actually dig up bones and suddenly remember that the particular specimen came from a lizard-looking creature that ate mammals. The way they learned about these creatures (millions of years dead) was by comparing their body structure to that of animals who live today. If a fossil resembled bones of a chicken, that must have been an ancestor of a bird, which meant it ate worms and bugs. My interpretation: scientists know nothing about fossils except for how old they are.

The more I looked into it, the less I understood, and the less I believed.

Let me ask you this: can you actually imagine an animal larger than an elephant wandering around? I'll admit it, I cannot fathom the concept of a world filled with creatures as large as the ones we see at the Natural History Museum. The AMNH in New York gets five million visitors per year. I think they're being lied to.

Half of what I saw of dinosaurs was in museums or scholarly books. The other half was in films, board games, and toys. Dinosaurs are a multi-billion dollar industry.

As a kid, I watched every Land Before Time movie, episode, and I even owned the PS1 game. Jurassic Park grossed $900 million in the box office, and every follow-up movie thereafter made record profit.

Consider this: every image of a dinosaur you have ever seen has been animated. When you go to a museum and see the fossils or the bones all laid out, they're not the real deal. They're plastic molds of casts from rocks.

When dinosaurs died out, how come the ones with wings didn't fly away from the infamous asteroid? Why didn't mosasaurus swim deeper into the ocean or a little further east and away from the dangers of climate change or whatever people are claiming killed off these powerful monsters? How could prehistoric mammals survive volcanic eruptions but the giant lizards couldn't fend for themselves? If there were dinosaurs in the Americas, but also in Africa, how did one flaming sky rock kill them all?

So many questions, so much money, so few answers. Poke fun at me all you want, but I'm just not buying it.

I think it's all just a conspiracy.

https://www.theodysseyonline.com/dinosaurs-arent-real
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 09:25 am
Another side effect of climate change:

Germany's hop farmers are reaping a poor harvest this year. Due to the heat and drought this summer, the harvest volume of just under 37,700 tonnes is 21 per cent lower than in the good previous year, the Association of German Hop Growers announced on Wednesday in Wolnzach, Upper Bavaria. Production costs had risen by more than 25 per cent, but the sales prices for most of the harvests for this year and until 2024 had already been contractually fixed. It is therefore very difficult to absorb the additional costs, said association president Adolf Schapfl.

However, the supply of the global brewing industry seems secure despite the low harvest because stocks from the good 2021 harvest are still available, the association stressed. "So nobody has to be afraid that their beer cannot be brewed".
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 10:09 am
somebody wrote:
...we have the ability to desalinize water from the ocean.

Yeah...but we don't have to means to distribute it from the coasts to the Southwest and mountain states. And desalination is expensive. It's done in some places quite successfully but not on the level that would be required to supply drinking water and irrigation to a vast area of the country.
somebody also wrote:
we have the ability to seed clouds, and make rain come to areas that need it.

Cloud seeding hasn't been proven to be all that effective, only hastening rainfall that would have happened anyway. It can even rob some areas of needed rainfall as weather patterns shift. The chemicals used may harm animal and plant life. It's very expensive. It will be instructive to see how effective it is in China.


izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 10:30 am
@hightor,
We had a desalinator when I was at sea. We couldn't use it within 12 miles of a coastline because of pollution.

That means coastal plants will be a lot more involved.
 

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