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Global Warming...New Report...and it ain't happy news

 
 
SSLTomK
 
  -4  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 10:31 pm
@woiyo,
Of course industrialization has affected the climate but imperceptibly. It has done FAR more good than bad. We were on the very edge of CO2 death of this planet and the burning of fossil fuels actually saved the Earth. The rain forests are now growing almost as fast as they can cut them down. We are feeding a world population 5 times larger than the 50's and better than ever before. Real hunger is now rare. The entire planet is recovering. Blue whales were essentially extinct and now there are more of them in just the Pacific Pod than were thought to exist in the entire world in 1960. Wild animals are walking around in cities because there is now so much competition that they must find new space. Grow up. If you think that Man isn't part of the ecology but is an enemy of it you are entirely uneducated.
0 Replies
 
SSLTomK
 
  -4  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 10:34 pm
@glitterbag,
The same people are saying the same stupid things now. Have you ever actually listened to Greta Thunberg? She is repeating the beliefs of her FATHER!
glitterbag
 
  4  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 10:45 pm
@SSLTomK,
Sorry Bub, I've put you on ignore. I don't know who you used to be, but I'm not interested in futzing around with you again....as W.C. Fields would say "Go away boy, you bother me"
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roger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 11:03 pm
@glitterbag,
Oh, well. . . .
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Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2021 02:59 am
As the carbon dioxide content of the air increases, plants also absorb more of the greenhouse gas. Carbon dioxide (CO₂) has a fertilising effect on plants, but this is now becoming smaller, a team of researchers reports in the journal Science. Over the past four decades, this fertilising effect has decreased by about 30 per cent.

Recent global decline of CO2 fertilization effects on vegetation photosynthesis
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hightor
 
  2  
Reply Sat 24 Apr, 2021 10:35 am
Mexico's drought reaches critical levels as lakes dry up

Drought conditions now cover 85% of Mexico
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Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Mon 26 Apr, 2021 02:08 am
Citizen assembly takes on Germany's climate pledges
Quote:
One hundred and sixty Germans, four major issues, one goal: for lawmakers to live up to their climate pledges. The Citizen Assembly is set to debate Germany's environmental ambitions and make sure its voices are heard.

A group of 160 German citizens chosen at random from across the country will launch an experiment in participatory democracy this week, aiming to inspire public debate and get the government to follow through with its pledge to reach net-zero CO2 emissions by 2050.

The Bürgerrat Klima, or Citizen Assembly, will follow the example set in the last few years by countries like Ireland, the United Kingdom and France. The concept, intended to directly involve citizens in the climate decisions that will shape their lives in the coming decades, is seen as a way for people to push for stronger climate policies and political action — though the previous experiments abroad have met with varying degrees of success.

Inspired by a 99-person Citizens' Assembly, the Irish government adopted a series of reforms in its 2019 climate bill aimed at reducing carbon dioxide emissions by 51% before the end of this decade. These included recommendations "to ensure climate change is at the centre of policy-making," and covered everything from clean tech and power generation to electric vehicles and plans to retrofit older buildings.
... ... ...
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hightor
 
  3  
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2021 05:05 am
Climate tipping points may have been reached already, experts say
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hightor
 
  3  
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2021 05:08 am
Wells dry up, crops imperiled, farm workers in limbo as California drought grips San Joaquin Valley
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Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Wed 28 Apr, 2021 12:14 pm
Speed at which world’s glaciers are melting has doubled in 20 years
Quote:
Glacier melt contributing more to sea-level rise than loss of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, say experts

The melting of the world’s glaciers has nearly doubled in speed over the past 20 years and contributes more to sea-level rise than either the Greenland or Antarctic ice sheets, according to the most comprehensive global study of ice rivers ever undertaken.

Scientists say human-driven global heating is behind the accelerating loss of high-altitude and high-latitude glaciers, which will affect coastal regions across the planet and create boom-and-bust flows of meltwater for the hundreds of millions of people who live downstream of these “natural water towers”.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 29 Apr, 2021 12:50 am
@Walter Hinteler,
An interactive database that reveals how the climate crisis is reshaping glaciers around the world
Visualised: glaciers then and now
Quote:
The visualisations were generated from a database of glaciers called Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (Glims). Scientists around the globe are continually adding new records to Glims, building a comprehensive inventory of glaciers and how they are changing over time.

Researchers have reconstructed these glacier outlines from satellite images, aerial photography and ground surveys. Some shapes resemble withering plants; some once monumental glaciers have broken up into small fragments.

In some cases, an apparent change in a glacier’s extent can be caused by different teams of researchers measuring it differently. But the vast majority of glaciers are losing more ice than they accumulate because global temperatures are much higher today than they were in pre-industrial times.

Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 29 Apr, 2021 04:45 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Germany's Federal Constitutional Court ruled today that the country's 2019 climate protection act is in part unconstitutional.
The judges gave the legislature until the end of next year to draw up clearer reduction targets for greenhouse gas emissions for the period after 2030.

The complaint was filed by a group of nine mostly young people. They are supported by several environmental associations, such as Friends of the Earth Germany (BUND) and Fridays for Future.
They had criticised the current law, saying it does not go far enough to sufficiently reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit climate change.
They argued that because the law will not limit climate change, it violates their fundamental right to a humane future.

"The challenged provisions do violate the freedoms of the complainants, some of whom are still very young," the court said in a statement.
"Virtually every freedom is potentially affected by these future emission reduction obligations because almost all areas of human life are still associated with the emission of greenhouse gases and are thus threatened by drastic restrictions after 2030," the statement said.

(German) Federal Constitutional Court - Press Release: Constitutional complaints against the Federal Climate Change Act partially successful
Quote:
In an order published today, the First Senate of the Federal Constitutional Court held that the provisions of the Federal Climate Change Act of 12 December 2019 (Bundes-Klimaschutzgesetz – KSG) governing national climate targets and the annual emission amounts allowed until 2030 are incompatible with fundamental rights insofar as they lack sufficient specifications for further emission reductions from 2031 onwards. In all other respects, the constitutional complaints were rejected.
... ... ...

Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 29 Apr, 2021 01:08 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
On the same day when the German Federal Constitutional Court handed youth (many of those even aren't allowed to vote) a great victory in their climate change fight, on this Thursday the Bavarian government present the second Bavarian Glacier Report.

Germany's glaciers can no longer be saved: in just ten years, even the last "eternal" ice could have melted. (Until now, experts had assumed that the death of the five remaining glaciers could last until 2050.)

The German glaciers are all located in Bavaria. They are the northern and southern Schneeferner and the Höllentalferner on the Zugspitz massif, as well as the Blaueis and Watzmann glaciers in the Berchtesgaden Alps. "Since 1850, the end of the Little Ice Age, we have lost about 88 per cent of the area of the glaciers and well over 90 per cent of the volume," explained glaciologist Christoph Mayer of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The ice surface has shrunk from more than four square kilometres to less than half a square kilometre now, he said.

"The remaining volume we now have on the glaciers in Bavaria is only about 50 per cent of what has melted in the last ten years," Mayer classified. The southern Schneeferner, of which only pitiful remnants exist today, was hit particularly hard. According to forecasts, it will have disappeared completely in a few years. The Blaueis and Watzmann glaciers are also unlikely to hold out much longer; even the still comparatively robust northern Schneeferner is losing around 250 litres of melt water every 30 seconds.

"The causes and interactions clearly lie in climate development," Mayer emphasised. It is not only the temperatures in the Alpine region, which have risen more than the average in Germany, that are causing problems for the glaciers. For example, humidity and the proportion of dark areas on and around the glacier also play a major role. "The Bavarian glaciers could still live well with the climate of 30 years ago. Unfortunately, they can no longer live with the radiation and temperature conditions of today," Mayer explained.

The melting of the glaciers has far-reaching consequences everywhere in the Alps, for example for the drinking water supply of the population. In addition, about 60 percent of all animal and plant species in Germany live in the Alpine region, as Glauber explained. Many of them are endangered by climate change. Warming also affects the permafrost: without this "glue" of the high mountains, rockfalls and mudslides increase.


(Source: see above link, additional material from dpa via Die Zeit[own translation for all])
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 29 Apr, 2021 01:27 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
On the same day when the German Federal Constitutional Court handed youth (many of those even aren't allowed to vote) a great victory in their climate change fight,
When reading the multiple comments and reaction:
Not even the plaintiffs themselves expected that the Federal Constitutional Court would agree with them and make such a far-reaching decision.

But this decision will fundamentally change the political debate here:
- if it goes well, it will become the starting point for a reorientation of the party landscape in which the reality of the climate crisis is accepted as a basis for action,
- if it goes badly, it will contribute to climate protection finally becoming a culture war issue.

In the decisive passages of the court's decision, the Federal Constitutional Court recognises an extremely unpleasant but undeniable fact: freedom becomes a scarce commodity under the conditions of the climate crisis.

If one takes the liberty now to decide against rapid climate protection and in favour of the fossil way of life, the consequences will be so dramatic, so existential, that there will hardly be any room for manoeuvre in the future. Not only because nothing can be done against the climate crisis, but also because the consequences of the climate crisis will foreseeably mean a permanent state of emergency characterised by compulsion instead of freedom.

A liberalism that does not recognise this destroys freedom instead of increasing it.



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Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2021 08:31 am
In 2020, the worst fires in decades raged in the Brazilian Pantanal. Nevertheless, Brazil's government still wants to pass a law to legalise land grabbing by farmers after the fact. It is not only environmentalists who fear further deforestation: Dozens of large European retail chains have now joined forces to prevent the plans from being passed.
British supermarkets had already threatened similar steps in May 2020, now the legislative plans are topical again - and more and more companies are taking part.

An open letter on the protection of the Amazon
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hightor
 
  2  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2021 03:18 am
Taiwan Drought Highlights Water Stress as Growing Environmental Risk

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hightor
 
  2  
Reply Sun 9 May, 2021 11:10 am
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2021 10:56 pm
@hightor,
The EPA says for the first time that climate change is being driven (in part) by humans.
The new data show how climate change is making life harder for Americans in myriad ways that threaten their health, safety and homes.

Climate Change Indicators in the United States
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