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Global Warming...New Report...and it ain't happy news

 
 
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 07:02 am
@livinglava,
Quote:
Clarification happens when people cooperate in communication instead of filling up posts/threads with fighting and insults.

In other words what youre saying is,"This guy insults me , the asshole"
snood
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 07:05 am
@farmerman,
🤪😂🤩👌🏾👍🏾
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 12:02 pm
@livinglava,
Quote:
We are still viewing geology as separate from climate science,
. hen you stick your head up yourass you "go for the mantle" dont you/ Most all climate science programs in major universities are associated with the geosciences schools . Look at Penn State, most of th research being done on ice CORES and sediment CORE analyses to determine past climate . Richard Alley is a geomorphologist whose entire career has been associated with climate past and climate future.

Theres very little difference between what killed the dinosaurs and what caused the recent four ice ages.

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 12:20 pm
@farmerman,
Here in Germany, climate science is studied at universities as a cross-sectional discipline.
Geologists work on time scales ranging from years and decades to several hundred million years if they want to understand the climate and trace the origins of the Earth's climate. However, not only the past plays a role for geologists but also the future. For example, they are researching suitable layers of earth when it comes to storing renewable energies or carbon dioxide emissions.

Palaeontology is also a science of climate research (palaeoontology is concerned with the quantitative, semi-quantitative and qualitative reconstruction of long past climate parameters, as well as their temporal and spatial dynamics).

Historical climatology is the study of historical changes in climate and their effect on human history and development. (Historical Climatology of Central Europe is unfortunately only online in German)
0 Replies
 
livinglava
 
  0  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 05:39 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Snood demonstrated that he understood perfectly what I had said. You're the one who consistently restates what others say, who gets it wrong, and then gets snide and insulting when this is pointed out. Irwin Corey? It's an insult to his memory to compare him to you.

Why won't anyone restate it in different words to prove what it means. Triangulation of wording results in greater accuracy of meaning; at least when the triangulation results in convergence and not divergence.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 05:45 pm
@livinglava,
Quote:
Triangulation of wording results in greater accuracy of meaning; at least when the triangulation results in convergence and not divergence.
and you have the gall to complain about others communication skills.
You seem to write to be vague by choice( not to mention that many of the words and phrases you use are total crap).
The old rule was ,"if I had more time I could have said it simply".
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 08:44 pm
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:
Look up Milankovitch cycles for the trigger for ice ages. Wikipedia is a good place to start.


There are two areas of sedimentology which have looked closely at ice-rafting and iceberg "calving" events over somewhat shorter time periods in the the case of Heinrich events, and very much shorter events in the case of Bond events.

You can read about Bond events by clicking here.
=https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/heinrich-event]You can read about Heinrich events by clicking here.[/url]

I first became aware of these events while reading about several "kiloyear" events. These are always cooling events which resulted in aridification, and having profound impacts on human civilization.

The 8.2 kiloyear event seems to have resulted in societal regularization of agriculture, and the linked rises of temple societies and irrigation control, in temperate zone civilization. In subtropical and tropical regions, it appears that such events lead to greater rainfall--for which, do a search for the African Humid Period.

The 5.9 kiloyear and 4.2 kiloyear events are also associated with drastic aridification events. The former probably gave rise to the Sumerian city states, which were quickly (a few centuries) taken over by the Akkadians, the first known Semitic people to come to prominence in the middle East. This is also the period of the rise of the Yellow River civilization in China, with the use of irrigation, and the foundation of "cities" (which we would probably consider to be just large towns. This was the period in which farming settlements appeared in the Indus River Valley.

The 4.2 kiloyear evvent more or less corresponds to the collapse of the Akkadian Empire, after the death of Sargon the Great. That civilization was eventually succeeded by Assyrians, who were, in fact, Akkadians. This is the period when the Xia "dynasty" was founded in China (both the Xia and Shang dynasties are considered not have been politically controlling dynasties in the manner of later dynasties). The Indus River civilization seems not to have been subject to aridification, and had gone through urbanization and perhaps the rise of temple societies.

Although I do not agree entirely with Mr. May's narrative, my disagreement are quibbles--I consider this a good online look at climate and civilization, although not very detailed. I recommend it to those who are not specialists (which I do not claim to be) but who want to get an idea of how climate and civilization have interacted since the end of the last ice age.
Glennn
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 08:59 pm
@Setanta,
Do you agree with Mr. May's conclusions?
snood
 
  2  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 09:51 pm
@Glennn,
Glennn wrote:

Do you agree with Mr. May's conclusions?


It’s almost like you guys don’t read the posts, then ask questions about what you didn’t read.
Setanta wrote:
Quote:
Although I do not agree entirely with Mr. May's narrative, my disagreement are quibbles--I consider this a good online look at climate and civilization, although not very detailed. I recommend it to those who are not specialists (which I do not claim to be) but who want to get an idea of how climate and civil


farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2020 06:05 am
@Setanta,
do you have any information about what triggered the "ky" events?? Since they were more locallized I was wondering whether the Akkadian civilization and the initiation of the AFAR vulcanism had anything in common?
Qe sorta know what triggers the Dansgaard/Oeschgers, Milankovitch, the Chandler wobble, Planetary Precession etc. Climate changes associated
Glennn
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2020 08:29 am
@snood,
Quote:
Although I do not agree entirely with Mr. May's narrative, my disagreement are quibbles . . .

He didn't mention his assessment of Mr. May's conclusion. It's almost like you didn't read my question, but you have an opinion of it anyway. But in all likelihood, you probably didn't even read Mr. May's conclusion.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2020 03:07 pm
You guys are still quoting entire articles and getting all worked up about them, without ever checking who wrote them, huh? Rolling Eyes

Mr Andy May, "petrophysicist", listed his qualifications and credentials on his own blog, none of which indicate he has any expertise in climate science.

His CV lists as his education: BS Geology, Kansas University, 1970-74.

He shares a background not uncommon to some other climate science deniers, particularly his association with the fossil fuel sector:

Quote:
Andy May has been a petrophysicist since 1974. He has worked on oil, gas and CO2 fields in the USA, Argentina, Brazil, Indonesia, Thailand, China, UK North Sea, Canada, Mexico, Venezuela and Russia. He specializes in fractured reservoirs, wireline and core image interpretation and capillary pressure analysis, besides conventional log analysis. He is proficient in Terrastation, Geolog and Powerlog software. 

https://andymaypetrophysicist.com/about/

When will you ever learn?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2020 06:44 pm
@farmerman,
For the Heinrich events, the melting of the Laurentide ice sheet is thought to be the culprit. For the Bond events, Mr. Bond speculated that the ice rafting was caused by the melting of the Greenland and Iceland glaciers. I don't know that either Mr. Bond or Mr. Heinrich proposed a mechanism for the melting. One popular hypothesis is variations in the planet's orbital path and axial tilt. The axial tilt right now, and for as long as humans have been aware of and studied the axial tilt is 23 1/2 degrees. But this can vary from 22.1 to 24.5 degrees. The eccentricities of the axial tilt and the degree of the elliptical nature of the planet's orbit determine how much solar radiation reaches the surface. We are fortunate (perhaps) in that in northern hemisphere winter, we are closest to the sun (more sunlight reaches the surface in the temperate zone) and farthest from the sun in northern hemisphere summer. The additional effect, which some may not immediately intuit is that in northern hemisphere winter we are moving faster, because we are closer to the sun, meaning winter does not last as long as summer, when we are moving more slowly in relation to our star--and therefore summer lasts longer.

The same is true of Mars, by the way, and it is more dramatic. Mars' orbit is more elliptical than ours, and that has been increasing over time. Relative to its entire orbit, it is closer to the sun in northern hemisphere winter, as compared to the Earth in relations to its entire orbit (in absolute terms, we get closer in northern hemisphere winter); in Martian northern hemisphere summer, Mars is much farther away from our star in both relative and absolute terms. The axial tilt of Mars is also a little more dramatic, ranging fr0m 20 to 25 degrees (relative to the plane of the ecliptic). The prevailing "wisdom" on this is that this is caused by the gigantic magma dome under the Tharsis plateau. Tharsis is home to three of the four largest volcanoes in our star system (as far as we know). Asria Mons, Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons run from south-southwest to north-north east across the Tharsis plateau, with the southern rim of the Pavonis Mons caldera sitting right on the Martian equator. Just to the northwest of the Tharsis plateau is Olympus Mons, believed to be (with good reason for the belief) the largest volcano in our star system. It is a massive shield volcano, rising more than three times above the plain on which it sits than Mt. Everest does above sea level. It is over 500 kilometers across the base from southwest to northeast. (If the northeastern edge of the volcano rested on the southern suburbs of Paris, the southwestern edge would cover Bordeaux, more than 300 miles away--that's a pretty impressive hunk of rock.)

Understanding the effect of axial tilt and the varying elliptical nature of the orbital path of both planets will provide a wealth of information which can be useful in the study of climate change. One caveat, though--the magma dome beneath Tharsis and Olympus Mons many not have caused the change in the axial tilt and elliptical orbit of Mars. There is growing conviction that the hypothesis of the "Big Hit" may have been responsible (that a planetesimal hit Mars), just as a planetesimal hitting the Earth probably created our moon, and gave us our extreme axial tilt.

There is so much to understand in order to get a handle on what effects our climate.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2020 06:45 pm
Oh look, two trolls whose entire contribution to the site (as well as this particular subject) is to go around attempting to start arguments. Lucky us!
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Feb, 2020 12:59 am
@Setanta,
Just debunking your fake science post. Anyone here should know better than swallow CC deniers' propaganda hook line and sinker... There are many professional liars out there, so check your sources. It isn't hard to do.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 26 Feb, 2020 01:13 am
Are you eager to demonstrate your ignorance?
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Wed 26 Feb, 2020 01:56 am
@Setanta,
Evidently you are, because you go on angry denial mode anytime I try to explain anything to you.

It is actually important not to help spread disinformation and lies about global warming. This is not about your obsession with "picking fights"; it is about avoiding evil. Seriously, you should know better.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Feb, 2020 03:03 pm
Death of the Nile

The world's longest river is sick - and getting sicker

Booming populations have dirtied and drained it, while climate change threatens to cut its flow.

And some fear that competition over its dwindling waters could trigger a regional conflict.
RABEL222
 
  0  
Reply Wed 26 Feb, 2020 08:09 pm
@hightor,
Im sure the feds will solve the Colorado river problem before Mexico and the u s go to war.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Wed 26 Feb, 2020 08:12 pm
@hightor,
That's a chilling piece. I worry about Bangladesh, with a population of more than 150 millions, and Indonesia, with almost 250 millions--sea level rise will flood their farmland. What will they eat, where will they go?
 

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