20
   

Should the US adopt the Celsius unit of temperature?

 
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2018 05:08 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Two centuries after going metric, we still use la livre in France, equivalent to the pound. It's a convenient retail quantity for flour, butter or meat, pegged at half a kg.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2018 05:20 pm
@Olivier5,
Butter still comes in one pound blocks here. Pretty much everything else in the grocery store has made the shift.

edit:

just learned something

https://www.dairygoodness.ca/butter/butter-tips-tricks/how-to-measure-butter

Quote:
How to Measure Butter

In Canadian recipes, butter is often measured by volume, not by weight. In the United States, it’s often measured in sticks, and in European and British recipes, by weight.

Here are the equivalents of some common weights and volumes: ....
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2018 09:02 pm
Rome got rid of their kings, and the Roman foot was not based on the length of any king's foot. Whether or not the "kings" of Rome were actually kings, or just satraps appointed by the southern Etruscan league, lead by the city state of Tarquinia, is a subject of lively debate among those who actually read and understand history, in the historiographic sense. The quote you provided does not support your bullshit claim that a foot was based on the length of any king's foot--you constant bullshit artist.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2018 09:05 pm
@Setanta,
Could someone tell Setanta that he can state his opinion, even disagree with another poster on the facts, without being such an ass about it.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2018 11:04 pm
@Olivier5,
Of course, I buy a pound of butter, and get a two pound loaf of bread in bakery ... but that's all in grams: since 1858 one pound (Pfund) is exactly 500 gram.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 02:00 am
@Walter Hinteler,
one problem with the changeover is when manufacturers change from imperial to metric without changing anything else.


https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51eIfN7k02L._SY445_.jpg

This used to take 3/4 of a pint of water to reconstitute. It still does, but instead of 3/4 of a pint which is nice and easy it's 425mls which is well fiddly when measuring jugs are denoted in 50ml marks.

It would be better on the consumer to add a bit more or take a bit off so it's 400 or 450 mls. It doesn't affect me, I'm just thinking of the children and future generations.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 02:18 am
@izzythepush,
We got and still gethere the same with labels on English marmelade and jam
https://i.imgur.com/xQ1yqFE.jpg
which actually isn't really a problem, since you have notices for the kilo/100 g price in the shop to compare.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 02:23 am
@Walter Hinteler,
You don't have to reconstitute marmalade but I can see how it would be a problem if you're using it as an ingredient for something else.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 06:21 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Yes, old units can perfectly survive within the metric system, as long as they are pegged to a standard unit like the gram or the meter. The point of the metric system (or any other legal system of weights and measures) is that scientific and commercial data and labels should be unambiguous within a certain polity, not that people cannot order a "pint" or a "demi" at the bar*.

* Un demi correspond a vingt-cinq centilitres de bierre, soit une demi-chopine (une mesure utilisée en France avant la Révolution et le systeme métrique).

Napoleon wrote against the idea of the metric system, with arguments that mirror some of the ones we read here ("good for scientist, but too complicated for the people"). Interestingly, one of the argument he raised was that the attempt by French revolutionaries to design a universal system -- not based on the traditional units of any country or on anthropomorphic measures like the foot or the coudée but based on the properties of the natural world e.g. water fusion and boiling points or density -- was foolish because whatever the French do, the "national spirit of the English and German will prevent the universal adoption of the new system"... Two hundred years later, the Système international d'unités (SI), inspired from the metric system, is used all over the world with very few exceptions.

So Napoleon was wrong: it DID pay off to design a purposefully universal system. Even the Brits have progressively warmed up to it and anglophone countries retaining the foot or the pound have come to define them in relation to the meter and the gram.

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 06:38 am
@Olivier5,
During my time in the navy, we stayed several weeks in France: I laway had to explain my Bavarian comrade that demi actually means a half, but not like in Bavaria (and other German states) "half a liter beer" (Halbe) but half of a chope - thus it was for them a "halbe Halbe".

In Belgium, btw, a demi is a pilsner of 25 cl or 50 cl, depending if you order in in the French or Flemish resp. German community.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 06:48 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Yes, the demi (chopine) is in fact a quarter (liter)... Nobody really cares though. It's just another pre-metric measure surviving in common language.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  0  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 06:56 am
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

Could someone tell Setanta that he can state his opinion, even disagree with another poster on the facts, without being such an ass about it.

What would be the fun of that? I'd rather watch him blow a gasket each and every time I press his button...
BillW
 
  0  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 07:50 am
@Olivier5,
Olivier5 wrote:

maxdancona wrote:

Could someone tell Setanta that he can state his opinion, even disagree with another poster on the facts, without being such an ass about it.

What would be the fun of that? I'd rather watch him blow a gasket each and every time I press his button...

or, just ignore pompous a's altogether!
Olivier5
 
  0  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 08:22 am
@BillW,
Yes, "don't feed the troll" is always good advice, but it's quite entertaining to see how Pedanta can totally lose his mind as soon as he addresses little me, or any one of the regulars he's decided to abhor. It provides a lesson in the corrosive effects of hatred on the human mind.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 08:58 am
Right, and there you have the sum of Olive Tree's "contribution" at this site. The attempt to get some one to "blow his gasket." He just comes here to argue, and he doesn't care how much bullshit he spreads to do so. As far as "hate," and blowing gaskets go--Olive Tree is a legend in his own mind. He wishes he had that effect.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2018 10:01 am
@Setanta,
I spread far less hatred, and far less BS than you do.

- For instance, your idea that change in sea level potentially affected the definition of the gram is ludicrous. Sea level rose by 25 cm (10 inches? or about the higth of one stair in a staircase) since the invention of the metric system. Given that gravity is a function of the square of the distance between the center of mass of two objects (in this case, the earth radius), the difference you mentioned would be of the following order of magnitude: (0.25/6371000)^2, that is about 10^-15 = a difference of a millionth of a billionth...

That's about how much lighter you feel when you step up one stair: about a millionth of a billionth of your total weight has been taken off, by virtue of you getting 25 cm away from the center of the earth... I leave to you to decide how significant a difference that makes.

- You said that the Romans didn't have kings, yet they did...

- Finally, be informed that in France, the "pied de roi" was the unit equivalent to the foot prior to the metric system, and that it was said to originate from the actual feet size of Charlemagne.

Here are a few of my contributions to this discussion. Now let see yours... Smile
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2018 10:10 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:


it's easy

40C you're melting
30C it's hot
20C it's warm
10C it's cool
0C its cold'

-30C **** off I'm not going out there, the dog can poop in the house


In Mexico City it works differently

35C you're melting (actually we've arrived there only once in a century)
30 C it's hot
25C it's nice and warm
20C it's nice and cool
15C it's cool
10C it's cold
5C it's freezing
0C **** off I'm not going out there, the dog can poop in the house

We're delicate people.
(And we don't have heating or air conditioning)

--

In Sinaloa, where I lived for couple years, it works this way:

50C you're melting
40C it's hot
30C it's nice
25C it's cold
20C it's freezing
15C This is not Sinaloa, it's freaking Mexico City!

In Sinaloa, they call the air conditioning "the climate".
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2018 10:41 pm
@fbaezer,
sounds like Mexico City has an almost perfect climate

in Toronto we hit -30C and 40C+ pretty much every year

that is just too big a range

ekename
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2018 10:48 pm
On sticks and stones of butter sans feathers or sealing wax:

Quote:
This quantity is sufficient for twenty-four sheep. In Perthshire in the north of Scotland, according to Dr. Robins on the composition now in use is likewise tar and butter. Some take two Scotch pints of tar to a stone of butter ; others only five stone of tar to that weight; and others in varicus preportions between these extremes.




If ifs an' ans were pots an' pans there'd be no work for tinkers 'ands.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2018 11:23 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

sounds like Mexico City has an almost perfect climate

in Toronto we hit -30C and 40C+ pretty much every year

that is just too big a range




Yes, almost perfect. That's why God sent us earthquakes, to compensate.

I was wrong about the historical maximum.
It is 33.9C (93 F)
Historical minimum: -4.4C (24.1F)

Average low in January 7C. Be envious.
Average high in the warmest month (May): 27C
Daily mean: 17.5C (63F)
0 Replies
 
 

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