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Excessive Cruelty In Movies Ought to Be Banned

 
 
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2017 01:41 pm
Seeking entertainment is one of the human priorities. To be relieved from the burden of the life and the tension in work, people tend to invent a lot of practices and activities that are able to transcend them into a better state mentally and emotionally. Watching movies, in my opinion is on the top of these activities. Despite the great role movies can play to enlighten and please us, penetrating them with a high level of unneeded and aimless cruelty is a dangerous threat.
Filming industry is one of the most artistic innovations humanity had achieved. However, Its effectiveness and ability to pass ideas and thoughts in an amazing manner have made it a two edged phenomenon. Through it concepts can me transferred within the society in a viral way. This fact, in my opinion, should move us to realize that regulating and keeping this industry under a strict surveillance is a priority.
The most dangerous films are those in which you would say a horrible cruelty, insane practices, and overwhelming levels of bloodiness. To be more clear I will take the movie of "The Human Centipede" as an example. I have peeked this movie by chance, I fell curious to watch it. It leaved me wondering, Why is that, What is the aim beyond this vicious work. How such a movie is accepted to be published.
My point is that the main aim of the movies was and it should always be to benefit and entertain us, and to develop our understanding of the world and its cutlers. And that we always should avoid what may steer them from this aim and turn them into an enemy rather than a great allay.
I am looking forward to hearing from you, since I feel it is a serious problem!
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 2,001 • Replies: 34
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chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2017 06:46 pm
@iamtooconfused,
So you want to quelch artistic expression in movies?

Why don't you include books, poetry, photography, dance, paintings, sculptures you don't like.

No one is forcing you to watch a movie that you find objectionable.



Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2017 07:37 pm
Also, NO HORSES FALLING DOWN IN MOVIES EVER , nor officious British men hurrying about in the street.

I'm just not having it.

0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2017 07:58 pm
I find myself disappointed in lots of movies, for their cruel violence and immoral trajectories, so I don't watch them. But I have never believed movies should be censored. Some of the most popular movies ever offend my sensibilities, but most persons will never know to which ones I refer. I just ignore them, mostly.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 01:13 am
@iamtooconfused,
Is this a genuine debate issue or an ESL exercise ?
As a 'debate' it is about Junior High School level.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 01:31 am
@chai2,
It's not like people didn't know what The Human Centipede was about. Why go and see a film like that and then complain about it? It all seems very pathetic.

Btw, I've not seen it, nor wanted to, the South Park episode was enough.

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 05:02 am
@izzythepush,
I had no idea that a movie about surgical conjoining was even on someones drawing board. Im more concerned with how CGI and other special effects (like extreme speed recording, or colorization ) has taken the place of good story lines. NOT EVERY GOOD MOVIE can be an epic, so why do the producers try to make it so.
Recently our cable company has opened a new channel (for us) that features a healthy dose of Film Noire flicks. Many of these were really great plot driven or character driven movies, well worth the watching on a couch ride. Yeh there were some noire duds but not as many as our present POS action adventure flicks.

Even Dunkirk, coullda been a much better pic had the producer really thought it out more. I was actually dissapointed at what would have been this summer's ONLY anticipated offering.

We streamed Kong f Kong Island, whata POS that was.

Here is the farmerman movie rule :
"The quality of a movie is inversely proportional to the number of CGI artists on the film credits times the body count therein"
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 05:11 am
@farmerman,
I don't think anyone has claimed that The Human Centipede is a good movie.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 05:38 am
@izzythepush,
Biologically , a portmanteau would be almost and impossibility for viability. So you think it was a bad movie.
How insightful
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 05:44 am
@farmerman,
No, I've been told it's a bad movie by someone who saw it. My response was why would anyone want to see it, because it doesn't interest me in the slightest.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 08:50 am
Cruelty to animals during the filming is another matter. It ought to be prosecuted.

1. Ben-Hur (1925)
The chariot race in the silent classic Ben-Hur remains surprisingly thrilling today — but the intensity of the scene came at a significant price. At least 100 horses were killed during the filming of the scene.

2. The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936)
Without anti-animal abuse laws in place, filmmakers were free to do whatever they deemed necessary to get their action sequences. But 1936's The Charge of the Light Brigade took things too far with its extensive use of the "running W" — a type of trip wire used to make horses fall during the filming of its climatic scene. In response to the film's rampant abuses, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals successfully petitioned to have the "running W" banned from further use.

3. Jesse James (1939)
Perhaps the key turning point against animal abuses on film came in the wake of Jesse James, a movie about the notorious outlaw. Two horses, outfitted with blinders, were tricked into running off a 75-foot cliff during production. The ruse was disguised, temporarily, by painting eyes on the horses' blinders. When word got out, the public outcry was so widespread that the Hays Office, which governed appropriate film content at the time, partnered with the American Humane Association to ban animal cruelty on film — eventually leading to the famous, reassuring phrase "No animals were harmed in the making of this film."
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 08:59 am
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
"No animals were harmed in the making of this film."
Except for the few Bluefin tuna and Pheasants served during lunch
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 09:23 am
@edgarblythe,
I was kidding with my comment, but I wrote it soon after watching the remake of Ben Hur, which I really liked. I squirmed through the chariot scenes, but was happy to notice CG effects with the worst horse scenes.

My non-sarcastic opinion about movies: I would tell parents to pay attention to what their kids are watching, and I'd support the prosecution of production houses down to their panties if people or animals are injured during filming.

The night after I watched Ben Hur, I had a lovely dream about an almost surreally-brightly colored bay--looked a bit like Half Moon Bay; glittery, vivid blue water, brightly colored sailboats and surfboards--and in an instant, everyone pulled a seal up onto their boat/board and began beating them in the head. An elderly woman in a kayak started scream-crying.

Thanks, Ben Hur.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 01:51 pm
@Lash,
The remake of Ben Hur is a fine movie, in my opinion. I don't always like Charleton Heston's films, but this one is great.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2017 07:01 pm
@edgarblythe,
I agree.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Sep, 2017 01:57 pm
When Rickie discovered the shenanigans that Lucy had been up to, and she was confronted by Rickie, and then burst out crying, I did not like Lucy's being upset.

When Alice was presnt when Ralph admitted his newest effort at success was a bust, and Ralph looked sheepishly contrite, I did not like that.

Sitcoms can be very cruel, and the laugh track makes me think that the producers think I am too stupid to know when to laugh.
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 26 Sep, 2017 05:41 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Even Dunkirk, coullda been a much better pic had the producer really thought it out more. I was actually dissapointed at what would have been this summer's ONLY anticipated offering.

Did you see it presented in 70MM IMAX?

Only anticipated offering? What about Valerian?
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Sep, 2017 06:13 pm
@Foofie,
When I was a kid, I really hated Lucy and her hairbrained schemes, and I was upset that Ricky didn't divorce her.

He was so hot.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Sep, 2017 06:38 pm
@Lash,
What gets me, that show never quit airing. It's on a channel, somewhere, every day.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Sep, 2017 01:21 pm
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

When I was a kid, I really hated Lucy and her hairbrained schemes, and I was upset that Ricky didn't divorce her.

He was so hot.


In real life, they did get divorced. However, in the early '50's when I was a child, there was a Lucy craze, where five and tens sold Lucy mugs, Lucy lunch pails for kids, many things with a Lucy theme.

There was an early color film, I think called The Long Trailer; very funny, even for a young kid. Plus, the movie theatre had air conditioning.
 

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