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Possible evidence of climate change, related discussion

 
 
Lash
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Jul, 2019 12:52 pm
A pathetic young midwestern farmer tries to explain the phenomena that is bewildering him without saying ‘climate change’ because he can’t bring himself to admit the fact.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/climate-reckoning-in-the-heartland-cbsn-originals/
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Jul, 2019 12:57 pm
Just a link you may not have for climate-related news.
https://grist.org
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Olivier5
 
  3  
Reply Sat 24 Aug, 2019 11:42 pm
Interesting take on the emotional intelligence of climate change:

Quote:
Let Yourself Feel How Bad This Is
By Bridget Read, The Cut

[...] It was fall; their lawn had been bleached to straw by drought. I hiked the Santa Ynez Mountains with my dad, who ran his hands along rocks stained with the memory of creeks and falls, marveling, “The sound of rushing water used to be so loud here.” He was 13 the last time it snowed in Los Angeles — measly flakes that barely covered the street, but still.

Looking out from the trail at the Pacific, I imagined it rising up along the coastline and changing its whole shape. We didn’t know that in three years, fires would make the mountains and the foothills even more bone dry. And that a year after that, rain, when it finally came, would roll down with the force of a tidal wave, washing a body up on the beach.

[...] For those of us who haven’t yet seen climate change fill our lungs with toxic air, fill our pipes with poisonous water, carry away our homes, kill our crops, or drown our families, grief is an aperture. It’s an opening in the soul where the pain of those faraway people can rest with yours. And where you can start to be willing to consider a future different from the one you imagined, to redress an epically uneven distribution of suffering.

In my weaker moments, I tend toward ironic detachment when confronting massive-scale horrors like the burning of the Amazon, posting something cooly depressed. Or I look away entirely, which I tell myself is an act of self care. The brain simply can’t take it all in. I don’t think that’s true — we just don’t have the language for it yet. Or we’re not used to applying the language we reserve for talking about our private tragedies to collective pain. [...]


https://www.thecut.com/amp/2019/08/amazon-fires-the-case-for-climate-grief.html
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Aug, 2019 03:01 am
Thank you for that excerpt.

I rapid-cycle from fury to guilt to avoidance. You can’t really take it in properly, I don’t think.
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Aug, 2019 03:52 am
@Lash,
For most people of our generation, it's still something abstract. It hasn't really sunk in yet. It's something that will happen after we die. Kids, however, tend to be quite nervous about it. Their future is at stake and they know it.
Lash
 
  3  
Reply Sun 25 Aug, 2019 04:05 am
@Olivier5,
When I see footage of dying polar bears, see the ungodly amount of plastics in the ocean, dying marine life, coral reefs bleached white, acres of farmland under floodwaters and we watch this weather change... I feel it.

It’s becoming too hot for me and my extended family to enjoy days outside—for example, the grandbairn loves the zoo, but we’ve waited purposefully on an overcast day to go. We don’t have afternoons outside unless we’re in a pool.

Climate change is affecting us now. These are just a few ways. Some people I know are considering a move north and inland.

A loveliness is gone. It’s a different world now.
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Aug, 2019 06:03 am
@Lash,
Quote:
A loveliness is gone.

Well put. When I see the songbirds I'm fortunate enough to host going through their daily routines, meshed perfectly into their environment using skills and making melodies that have been honed for hundreds of thousands of years, I wish I could see them as I used to, without this sense of a dark curtain slowly being drawn over their world — and ours. It didn't have to be this way.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Sun 25 Aug, 2019 06:31 am
Around here, I used to marvel at the birds overhead as seasons changed. No more. Aso, I often recall a conversation with a man who used to work cleaning up toxic waste dumps. He concluded it with the caustic comment: "It's too late to do anything about it." A few years ago, when hurricane whatever flooded Houston for weeks, certain of the waste dumps leached into the floodwater, along with whatever from all the industrial plants - You can see it can't be good, no matter how they gild it. And that's just a tiny fraction of what the planet is experiencing.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Aug, 2019 11:12 am
@Lash,
When I was a kid, I remember one summer in Reims, northern France, when the temperature reached 32 Celsius (89 fahrenheit). Adults were talking about it like it was amazing.

This summer, France has been hit by three heat waves so far, with record temperatures all over. In Reims, the record was set on 25 July 2019, at 41 degree Celsius (105.8°F). In the south of the country, 46 Celsius were recorded (114.8°F).

It's only going to get worse. By 2050 our summer will be one long heatwave.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Aug, 2019 08:05 pm
@Olivier5,
I took note of a European heatwave weeks ago (Italy? France?); considering most older dwellings aren’t equipped with central air, I don’t know how you guys withstood the heat. People were in the fountains. Was so sad for older people and younger children. I wonder when we’ll start building underground.
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2019 02:22 am
@Lash,
Some probably did not withstood the heat this year. The numbers are not out yet but a previous heatwave in 2003 killed 15,ooo (generally older) French people. The nation is better prepared now, eg in the number of air conditioning systems, or in terms of awareness of the risks, but still.

It kills.

Letty comes to mind.

Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Fri 30 Aug, 2019 11:53 am
Hundreds of teens join Greta Thunberg in climate protest outside UN
Miranda Bryant in New York, Fri 30 Aug 2019 12.38 EDT, The Guardian

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg was joined by hundreds of American teenagers protesting outside the UN headquarters in New York on Friday calling for adults to act on the crisis of global heating. [?]

The young protesters – many who said they had been inspired by the 16-year-old to take action and for some of whom it marked their first ever climate demonstration – gathered outside the iconic Manhattan building at 11am.

Carrying hand-drawn placards with messages such as “united behind the science” and “act now or we will”, children and young people of all ages from New York and nearby states such as Pennsylvania and New Jersey, met at a park in front of the flags of the world outside the UN.

Holding her trademark “skolstrejk för klimatet” (Swedish for “school strike for climate”) sign, Thunberg sat in the middle of the rally where young activists gave speeches about calling for action on the climate crisis amid chants including “System change, not climate change” and “Don’t just watch us, join us”. [...]

On Friday morning, American teenager Alexandria Villaseñor, 14, who has been protesting every Friday outside the UN since December, was in her usual spot and said she had been inspired by Thunberg’s school strike campaign.

“Greta being here in the United States and in America will really galvanise students just because of how much of an inspiration she is. Everyone who’s been striking on Friday was really empowered by Greta and the action she was taking.”

After just one full day to recover from her crossing on the Malizia II racing yacht in rough seas, life on which she has described as “camping on a rollercoaster”, Thunberg was already back to protesting.

Villaseñor, who is thought to be America’s first school striker to join the movement and has been exchanging tips with Thunberg online, had been among the group of American climate activists who welcomed her to the US when her yacht docked at North Cove Marina.

Villaseñor said: “What’s really important about Greta being here today is it’s the start of something new because with the United Nations climate summit coming up it is the way for all the youth to unite here and send a message to world leaders at that climate summit. So even though Greta’s voyage on Malizia ended a couple of days ago, the climate action we will take on this continent has really just begun.”

Other US youth have been spurred into action and gathered also on Friday.

Catherine Tsarouhtsis, 16, a high school student from Long Island, east of New York City, has been striking since the first organised global strike in March.

She said: “I’ve been having climate anxiety for a long time and then I heard about Greta and how she was striking in front of her parliament and I was confused why Europe was starting to ‘catch the fire’ but why it wasn’t crossing the ocean.”

She added: “And then Alexandria started in this city, that was very shocking to me, actually, and it inspired me, kind of fueled my fire and just went from there. Her coming to another continent on a boat, that proved a pretty big point, coming to America [where] we have not called the climate emergency.”

On Wednesday, Thunberg said that her generation has been put in a position of having to “clean up” the climate crisis that the generations above her have caused.

For Dana Henao, 16, from Brentwood, Long Island, Friday marked her first climate protest.

“The government isn’t taking enough action to protect the environment and all they care about is the money they make with corporations polluting the planet and I think we should put a stop to it,” she said. “The young people are the only ones taking action and we want to call attention to this.”

She added: “She [Greta] is really popular and she’s like, the face of the movement.”



https://amp.theguardian.com/environment/2019/aug/30/greta-thunberg-un-climate-protest-new-york
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Aug, 2019 02:18 pm
@Olivier5,
Must show my students this! Kidpower! This is such an interesting kid.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Aug, 2019 02:25 pm
@Olivier5,
I completely missed this.


Quote:
Letty comes to mind.


Did something happen to her?
roger
 
  3  
Reply Fri 30 Aug, 2019 03:41 pm
@Lash,
She died several years ago. We had enough correspondence that I had an email from her son.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Aug, 2019 03:53 pm
@roger,
I’m so sorry to hear this. She’s left quite a legacy here. Thanks for telling me.
0 Replies
 
cherrie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Aug, 2019 10:23 pm
@roger,
I wasn't aware that she had died either. That's really sad.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Fri 30 Aug, 2019 11:03 pm
@roger,
I did not know that. Was it posted somewhere here at the time? I may have been off a few days and missed it.
roger
 
  3  
Reply Fri 30 Aug, 2019 11:24 pm
@Sturgis,
It was mentioned in the WA2K thread. I'm fairly sure her son posted there under her username.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Aug, 2019 01:13 am
@roger,
Thanks. I think it’s fair to say several people missed it. I’m sure they appreciate the information. I do, too.
0 Replies
 
 

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