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Christianty & Climate Change

 
 
Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 08:38 am
I am curious what the church's view is on climate change or if they even have one. The reason i ask is because i got the impression as gods people we are supposed to be looking after the planet?
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Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 1,605 • Replies: 10
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tycoon
 
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Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 10:19 am
Christians are all over the map on this one, unsurprisingly. I think it's a matter of personal belief, with an admixture of political leanings thrown in.

One of the most nonsensical positions I've heard comes from Rush Limbaugh, whose outspoken criticism of climate change has religious underpinnings. He claims God would not allow his creation to be spoiled by man-made pollution. My jaw drops noticeably every time he espouses this view.
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Green Witch
 
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Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 10:27 am
@Jason Dare,
There are many Christian environmentalist groups. If you Google "christian environmentalism" you will see what I'm talking about.
Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 10:33 am
@Green Witch,
The Evangelical Church of Germany (some 20 Evangelical, Protestant, Lutheran and Reformed churches = about 1/3 of the German population) has programs regarding Climate Change since the early 1990's ...

The Catholic Church in Germany (= another 1/3 of the German population) has similar programs starting around the same time ...
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rosborne979
 
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Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 11:14 am
@Jason Dare,
Jason Dare wrote:
I am curious what the church's view is on climate change or if they even have one. The reason i ask is because i got the impression as gods people we are supposed to be looking after the planet?

Some people believe in this "Rapture" thing, so I don't think they worry about environmental damage because they don't plan on being around. I don't know what the Church's official view on it is. I guess it depends on which Church.
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Merry Andrew
 
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Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 11:17 am
I never realized that climate change had much -- if anything -- to do with religion.
Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 11:19 am
@Merry Andrew,
We think differently here, totally different (God's creatures, nature and all that; Christian responsibility etc ...).
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Green Witch
 
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Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 11:30 am
@Merry Andrew,
The Pope has been making very strong pro-environmental statements in the last few years. There are even fundamental groups that believe you have to preserve the earth so Jesus will have a place to return to- when he's good and ready.
saab
 
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Reply Wed 30 Dec, 2009 11:48 am
I think I read that the Danish priest will hold their sermons aboat the climate change at New Year. I can only agree with Walter that the church just like every other institution has do something regarding the enviroment.
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rosborne979
 
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Reply Fri 1 Jan, 2010 09:30 am
@Green Witch,
Green Witch wrote:
There are even fundamental groups that believe you have to preserve the earth so Jesus will have a place to return to- when he's good and ready.

Yeh, wouldn't want to have to redo that 7 day creation thing all over again, that was a lot of work.
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revel
 
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Reply Sat 2 Jan, 2010 07:59 am
I think this pretty well answers the question as Christians do we have a responsibility towards the earth.

Quote:
To think that God gave man carte blanche to plunder and destroy the earth is simply ludicrous. He is its Creator! Why would He immediately command Adam to ruin it? Would any woodworker, upon just finishing a beautifully stained piece of furniture, tell his son to break it up for firewood? No! Just as God desires for His creation, the woodworker would put his handiwork to use and also care for it by keeping it waxed and dusted to prolong its life.

This is exactly what God told Adam. Genesis 2 contains a parallel account of creation, adding detail to certain parts of the narrative of the first chapter. Notice God's expanded instruction: "Then the LORD God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to tend [dress, KJV] and keep it" (verse 15). This greatly modifies the force of "have dominion" and "subdue it" from Genesis 1:26, 28!

Tend (Hebrew 'abad) means "to work or serve," and thus referring to the ground or a garden, it can be defined as "to till or cultivate." It possesses the nuance seen in the KJV's choice in its translation: "dress," implying adornment, embellishment, and improvement.

Keep (Hebrew shamar) means "to exercise great care over." In the context of Genesis 2:15, it expresses God's wish that mankind, in the person of Adam, "take care of," "guard," or "watch over" the garden. A caretaker maintains and protects his charge so that he can return it to its owner in as good or better condition than when he received it.


source

As for the question as to whether we think we ourselves are capable of our own destruction, I am not sure really. I know that someday (in my belief) (btw--not every christian believes in the rapture)the earth will end and Jesus will come to take the saved to heaven and the lost will be in a fervent heat. Perhaps that heat will be man made, perhaps not. I know it won't be a flood.

2 Peter 3
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