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You need more than a finger in the dike now to save the Netherlands

 
 
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 02:57 pm
Quote:
03-09-2008
A committee charged with investigating the future effect of rising sea levels on the Netherlands delivered its findings today. The 'Delta Committee' headed by former minister Cees Veerman says large-scale work is needed to extend and strengthen dykes in the Netherlands.
[...]
The Delta committee concludes that the level of protection against flooding needs to be ten times greater than it is at present. It recommends that the process of pumping extra sand to reinforce the North Sea coast needs to continue. Where necessary, shipping channels will have to be relocated.

A quarter of all the current sea defences fail to meet legal safety standards, and the committee also concludes that the present standards are, in fact, by no means strict enough. It points out that 65 percent of the country's assets - valued at some 1800 billion euros, according to a conservative estimate - are in areas that are liable to flooding.[...]


Quote:

Two-thirds of the Netherlands' 16 million people live below sea level, mostly on land reclaimed from the sea over the centuries and protected by high banks of sand.“We're not trying to scare people, because there's still time to act,” commission chairman Cees Veerman said in handing the report to Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende in a nationally televised news conference.

Mr. Balkenende promised to begin drafting its recommendations into Rising sea levels:Dutch dykes in need of massive overhaulimmediately.
Dutch policy-makers have, until now, prepared for a rise in sea level of around 80 centimetres by 2100. The commission said the country must plan for a rise in the North Sea by as much as 1.3 metres by 2100, and by up to four metres by 2200.

The commission was created in September, 2007, after the world witnessed the damage caused by hurricane Katrina in Louisiana. Among other things, the Dutch began drawing up plans for worst-case scenarios that included evacuations " unthinkable politically just a few years ago.

Specific recommendations include improving dikes' strength “by a factor of 10,” using offshore sand supplementation to broaden dunes that guard much of the country's central coast and strengthening sea dikes.

The country's worst flood in living memory was a 1953 disaster in which a storm surge drove water along the Dutch coast more than four metres above normal levels, breaching defences and killing more than 1,800 people.

“Throughout history, we have made water plans after a disaster,” Sybe Schaap, the country's chief water official, told NOS news. “What is unique about this plan is that it has been drawn up before a disaster.”



Sources:
Radio Nederland: Dutch dykes in need of massive overhaul

Globe and Mail: Keeping the North Sea at bay
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 03:02 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Implementing a plan before a disaster - How unique. I hope it works.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 03:09 pm
@edgarblythe,
Yeah, I think they will work out a timely and orderly response.
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  3  
Reply Sun 7 Sep, 2008 06:28 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Sometimes I wonder if the global warming alarmists are using scare tactics to get their point across without doing the proper science. For instance, the Himalayan glaciers were mentioned as disappearing which at first blush alarmed me. I started to analyse that even if they all melt, the rivers Brahmaputra, Mekong, Ganges, etc that flow from the ranges will not dry up. The glaciers are not the source of water. The source of water are the monsoon rains. Some of the moisture end up being frozen or turned to snow in the higher elevation. As the glaciers are a reservoir of frozen monsoon rain it is a temporary storage.

Same thing goes with the sea level. All the ice will not melt as there is still winter in one of the poles. The sun oscillates between the tropics of Cancer and Capricon so by the time the sun comes back to the Equator after visiting say the North Pole, the ice will start forming again in the north. The ice that melts will be spread over all the area of existing oceans and land threatened by the ice melt. As the Earth is a globe the extra height adds to the area and volume so the actual sea level rise would not be more than 2 meters as a guess.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Sep, 2008 10:34 pm
@talk72000,
Well, if you'd lived below sea level as man people in the Netherlands do, if you had a history of really disastrous floods - I wonder what you would do.

0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 02:16 am
@talk72000,

Even two metres is global disaster- for instance, bye bye Bangladesh and many islands.
talk72000
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 09:08 pm
@McTag,
McTag:
Much of the land is silt washed down by the river or a delta. In time it will build up again.

Walter:
I have seen pictures of the huge dikes of the Netherlands on either National Geographic or some other magazine, maybe Popular Science. They have a highway along the periphery of the dikes.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 11:06 pm
@talk72000,
I really don't think that the Dutch dikes are (a lot) higher then ours.

We've roads behind the dikes as well - you're perhaps referring to the dike road from Enkhuizen to Lelystad, across the Zuiderzee/IJsselmmeer.
0 Replies
 
 

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