cjhsa
 
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 05:42 pm
Many of you will attempt to pair wine with your turkey this year. It's not as easy as it would seem. This is because turkey has flavor components that offen conflict with the wine, and vice versa. Ever notice how eating a turkey dinner makes you sleepy? That's because turkey contains tryptophan, a chemical that can also conflict with wine flavors.

If you like white wine, I'd recommend against chardonnay unless you have a light and fruity one. What I do recommend is Sauvignon Blanc, particularly from the Marlborough region of New Zealand. These SB's are world class and pair perfectly wity turkey.

If you must drink red, then I'd recommend Pinot Noir, perhaps one from Oregon, or the Carneros region of California.

For blush wine drinkers, please, no white zinfandel. Go with a dry vin gris, such as that made by Bonny Doon.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 3,451 • Replies: 31
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NickFun
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 05:55 pm
I'm a beer drinker. I'm all set.
0 Replies
 
Wy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 10:03 pm
Me too. I've heard Spanish roses suggested -- crisp and clean. Sounds OK but I'll stick with beer probly.

There's a cruise company advertising that sleepiness caused by trip-to-phan is easily counteracted with trip-to-caribbean...
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princesspupule
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:47 pm
Hm, I prefer Louis Jadot Puilly Fuisse with my turkey...

A glass of champagne before dinner is also nice...
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:49 pm
Bah, frog wine.
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:53 pm
Your suggestions are sound, cjhsa. Unoaked Chardonnay could also do the trick for white.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:54 pm
Or even a nice Gamay, for red.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:00 pm
I have some Araujo Altagracia Cabernet Sauvignon set aside for the occasion, as well as some Miller Lite.

Would those be appropriate choices?
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:01 pm
I just really like the NZ Sauvignon Blancs.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:04 pm
gustavratzenhofer wrote:
I have some Araujo Altagracia Cabernet Sauvignon set aside for the occasion, as well as some Miller Lite.

Would those be appropriate choices?


I have never heard of that winery before Gus, but a Google search indicates that you have a great bottle(s) of wine. I'd save it for a prime rib roast though.

I like Miller Lite.
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:04 pm
So you think the Cab. is not a good idea, eh? Well, I haven't bought any yet... but we are red wine drinkers.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:05 pm
I will accept your advice, cjhsa.
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:08 pm
cjhsa, I get a free trade pass to the NZ wine festival annually. The only thing that has bothered me recently is the move to tone the wines down for the international market. Nah, give me gooseberry, cat piss and acidity. It's all come down to the house these days. I've always been a fan of St. Clair. http://www.saintclair.co.nz/
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:18 pm
I'll give them a try Cav.

Merlot is another red wine choice that can match up well with turkey. But you need a really good one, most of them are just so flat on the palate that I rarely buy them and thus cannot recommend any that are widely available.

The best merlot I ever had was produced by the Page Mill Winery Dick and Dane Stark's basement operation in Los Altos Hills.

http://www.pagemillwinery.com/
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:21 pm
Hm, I've never had an NZ wine,
but love wines from South Africa and Argentinia.

Pinot Noir sounds good. Just had a glass last night -
Mondavi 2001.
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:27 pm
Pinot Noir is probably my favourite and least favourite red wine. Favourite because when it's good, it's sublime, least favourite because it is a tough grape to cultivate, and even Pinots from the top houses in Burgundy can often suck major ass. Calera has been pretty consistent with Pinot Noir, as has Amity, and in Canada, Inniskillin.
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:31 pm
When in doubt regarding Pinot, go for the Gamay. Gamay is the grape used for Beaujolais, a region just south of Burgundy, sunnier and less stuck up, and the wines reflect that. Gobs of fruit, the best ones are even complex, but overall, they are crowd pleasers, and a fine, less pricey companion to a turkey dinner, for the red wine fans.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:46 pm
I wondered if a red zinfandel would go good with turkey. Any thoughts?
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:47 pm
What zin would that be Linkat?
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:55 pm
I wasn't thinking of a particular brand or region - I tend to buy California Zins - not too sweet. I have just heard that red Zinfandels go with lots of different foods - more casual like Chinese and Pizza. I love a not sweet Red Zinfandel. Any suggestions for these? Never tried it with turkey though - I usually get a Sauvignon Blanc, but usually like to provide a red also for a choice.
0 Replies
 
 

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