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Death and Exercise

 
 
Miller
 
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 03:41 pm
Why do Doctors, today, encourage their patients to exercise, when many of these patients ( especially) those over 65+ years of age frequently drop dead while working out?

A recent example was the sudden death of a very famous 65(?) year old male scientist on the West coast, while riding his mountain bike up a fairly steep incline. Since this man had a history of heart problems should he have undertaken any type of nonpassive exercise , much less one that involved riding a mountain bike up a steep trail?

How can patients judge their limits when it comes to the health of their hearts and the limits to which their hearts should be stressed by exercise?

Why are some Doctors so pushy when it comes to heart health and exercise?

 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 03:47 pm
@Miller,
Interesting question. I wonder if the scientist made his or her own judgement re the mountain biking and the slopes he rode. I've never been a mountain biker, but I figure there are various types of trails. I wonder if he was always an exercising person, or did it only sporadically.

I also figure there are variations in mds' knowledge about exercise; I don't know, but I suspect that many docs may have people they reference, such as physiotherapists, who they connect the patient to, while describing the patient's state of health.

Got a link?
Miller
 
  0  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 03:59 pm
@ossobucotemp,
This man had recently won a Nobel prize, so I'm of the opinion that he liked to push himself to the limits of whatever he was doing.

One other thing, exercise is supposed to strengthen the heart muscle. But again, what are the limits?
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 04:08 pm
@Miller,
I dunno, seems to me there should be some watching involved re this or that rise in heartbeat, etc., what with all the new tools around.

You may be right about the fellow's forward going nature.

Years ago when I belonged to what I remember was a great YMCA, there was a lot of instruction on this kind of thing; somewhere in my files I think I still have the results of their testing me and their recommendations. This person would likely "know better". Or, maybe he wasn't that way, maybe the opposite, and trying to obey the exercise agenda.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 04:13 pm
@ossobucotemp,
I meant to add, some of our posters have been through varieties of heart stuff, and know more, at the least re how they were instructed. The ones I'm thinking of are not dummies.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 04:33 pm
On the recent deaths thread, I noted that a 79 yr old former actor died of an aortic rupture, while ice skating with his 19 yr old son.

How does one test for lesions in the aortic wall? Visualization or measurements?
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 04:42 pm
@Miller,
I don't know. My father in law died of an aortic aneurysm, as they called it then. No clue before it happened. At this point I don't remember how often they saw doctors, though his wife had been a nurse. I wonder too about testing for it at routine screenings of elders. I don't know if they happen slowly or fast.

We could look some of this up.
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 05:18 pm
@ossobucotemp,
They also use what's called a stress test...I wonder about folks who drop dead during this test...
0 Replies
 
perennialloner
 
  2  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 05:26 pm
Did his doctor advise him to go mountain biking? In my experience, when doctors speak about exercise they simply mean physical activity which could be taking a walk every day. I hardly think that can be considered bad for people, even if old. It's not like doctors are encouraging patients to take on extreme sports. They simply want their patients to be active, as that is very important for people's health regardless of their age.
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 05:33 pm
@perennialloner,
I don't know what his Doctors told him to do. Because of his standing in science, I'd bet that his physician handled him with kid gloves.

0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  4  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 06:08 pm
Interesting question. I've worked our regularly and hard for my whole adult life; long distance running & bike riding, 10 years on a West Coast Rugby team, weight lifting etc. I'm in my 70s now and still at it, though I gave up deep squats & running when I had a knee replacement a few years ago. I've cut back a bit on the max weights (bench press at 185lbs now vs 245 a decade ago - but substitute with more reps. Giving ground slowly is the plan now). My doc has suggested "finding more age appropriate exercises" (whatever that is) but I'm staying with my routine. While your'e living - live, and use it or lose it are my rules.

I learned decades ago that working out didn't solve any of my problems, but for about six hours after a good workout I didn't give a damn. Much later I learned it was the seratonin rush .... I'll take it !
maxdancona
 
  3  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 06:51 pm
@Miller,
Don't they cover statistics in Medical School?

Sure there are stories of exercise causing death. There are also stories of seat belts causing death. That doesn't mean that exercising or wearing a seat belt lowers your life expectancy. There are even people who have choked to death eating a salad....

Data is not the plural of anecdote.
George
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 07:04 pm
@georgeob1,
Yeah!
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 07:10 pm
So how many more people drop dead because they weren't doing any exercise?

That's like people who smoke saying "Well, everyone's got to die of something"

Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 09:03 pm
@georgeob1,
Quote:
seratonin rush

I believe that rush is atrributable to endorphins not seratonin. Written from Nitpickers Anonymous.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 11:05 pm
@chai2,
Quote:
That's like people who smoke saying "Well, everyone's got to die of something"


Brings to mind a friend from years back, who, upon the death of her father blamed the manufacturers of Lucky Strike cigarettes for having caused his death. The fact that he was 95 didn't factor for into her thinking.

She also considered suing the Federal government because (according to her), the army had encouraged him to smoke and so he perished far far too young.
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 11:09 pm
@georgeob1,
Sounds like an excellent routine. How's your blood pressure?
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 11:13 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

Sure there are stories of exercise causing death.



Should people with some form of heart disease exercise? Sure...some exercise is good for the heart, even if you don't have heart disease, but what if you have heart disease?

How do you know how far to go with exercise, so that you don't kill yourself during the process of trying to be healthy?

0 Replies
 
roger
 
  3  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 11:14 pm
@Sturgis,
I could fault the federal government. At reception center, a sort of pre basic training, tobacco representatives were handing out samples as fast as their little hands could move. Still, it was a choice, and in 1962 we were already calling them coffin nails and cancer sticks.

Personally, I'm not that worried about being dead, but how it happens is a concern. COPD is a long, slow death while you're on a very short leash connected to your oxygen bottle.

We are all going to die, but hopefully, we can minimize the less attractive ways to go.

Oh yeah, we were talking about exercise, weren't we?
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 03:17 pm
@Miller,
What about that actor that was in a sitcom decades ago, and now was doing other work. He was originally Canadian. His name skips me now. But he was playing hockey with his son when he got a heart attack, just a week ago or so, I thought.

Why wouldn't some doctors advocate for exercise, when a senior citizen that collapses during exercise is big bucks for the medical establishment? If you know any woman who lived into their 90's back in the 20th century, their exercise was shopping and dusting and cooking. They often outlived their husbands by a lifetime.

But, now that women are competitive, and might get as angry as males, they might be shortening their lives? Stupid is as stupid does (taken from the movie, Forest Gump).

 

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