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Particles in Japanese language

 
 
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2016 08:26 am
I'm learning Japanese.

If I'm trying to say something with an adverb, such as "watashi ga ji wo kirei ni kakimashita," as in, "i wrote a word neatly/beautifully," where kirei serves as an adverb instead of adjective, is the word acting as an adverb always followed by "ni"?

Is this correct?

kanojo wa nihongo wo jouzu ni hanashimasu

If a word is a natural adverb, do I need the ni particle?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,652 • Replies: 13
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dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2016 11:07 am
@perennialloner,
Goog God Loner, and I had spent six years there. Hope for your sake I'm not alone; but I'd guess yes you need it

Help...
TheSubliminalKid
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2016 12:04 pm
@dalehileman,
Was that **** racism?
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2016 01:15 pm
@TheSubliminalKid,
Quote:
racism?
No way so intended, Kid. But tell us, what made you think so
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2016 08:31 pm
@perennialloner,
They're both correct.
However, my Japanese lessons were over 65 years ago.
I can still read and write some kanji. It really helped when my wife and I went to Japan in 1982.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2016 08:32 pm
@TheSubliminalKid,
I known dale for several years, and I know he's not racist.
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 11:03 am
@cicerone imposter,
Thank you Cis
0 Replies
 
FuLinen
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 May, 2017 08:27 am
@perennialloner,
Your analysis is good, but it's still not exactly right.

We know that there are two types of Japanese adjectives:
1. i-adjective.
2. na-adjective.

For i-adjectives, if we want to use it as adverb. First remove the trailing "i" then add "ku".
An example of this would be the English sentence "They eat loudly."
Since "loud" is "urusai" and "eat" is "tabemasu". "Eat loudly" will
become "urusaku tabemasu".

For na-adjectives, if we want to use it as adverb. Just add "ni" behind the
na-adjective.
An example of this would be the English sentence "They speak quietly."
Since "quiet" is "shizuka" and "speak" is "hanashimasu". "Speak quietly" will become "shizukani hanashimasu".

As for natural adverb. We usually use it in isolation in a sentence.
An example of this would be the English sentence "Pretty hot."
Since "pretty" is "kanari" and "hot" is "atsui". "Pretty hot" will become "kanari atsui".

Good luck on your language journey!
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 May, 2017 09:56 am
@FuLinen,
Wow, thanks so much! This was super helpful. Ive taken a break in my learning but now that it's summer hopefully I'll spend more time studying.

To clarify - I want to be sure I'm understanding you fully - i adjectives end in i and na adjectives don't end in i?

Also, given what you have said, the first example I used is constructed improperly. Kirei should not be followed by ni, correct? It should instead change form to kireku when combined with a verb; so, kireku kakimashita.

Have Iunderstood you?
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 May, 2017 12:15 pm
@perennialloner,
Yes. Or, Nihongo wa jozu desu.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 24 May, 2017 07:32 pm
@cicerone imposter,
http://japaneselevelup.com/7-reactions-nihongo-jouzu-desu-ne/
https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090214191925AAKT6sV

Cis I love ya
0 Replies
 
FuLinen
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 May, 2017 09:12 pm
@perennialloner,
Wow, this is really a good question. Actually "kerei" is a na- adjective.

All i-adjectives always end in "i". However, you may have noticed that some na-adjectives also end in "i" such as "kerei". Almost all the na-adjective that ends in "i" are usually written in Kanji so that you can easily tell that it's not an i-adjective.

For example, "kerei" written in Kanji looks like 「綺麗」or「奇麗」. Since the "i" is a part of 「麗」, you konw that it can't be an i-adjective. That's because the "i" in i-adjectives is to allow conjugation without changing the Kanji.

So I suggest you should study Kana and Kanji instead of Romaji.

cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 May, 2017 03:43 pm
@FuLinen,
Asking to study kanji is not realistic. There are 47,000 kanji in the Japanese language.
I studied Japanese as a young teen up to the third grade, and learned some kanji, but have forgotten most of them. I can remember simple words like entrance, exit, woman, man, and gossip. Gossip was written with three women grouped together when I studied Japanese, but that doesn't seem to exist now. Wink


River is written: 川 (kawa, "river") It looks like a river flowing.
FuLinen
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 May, 2017 07:36 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Just as you have said, kanji is a form of ideogram which to represent the idea of a thing, rather than the sounds of a word.

May it's hard for English-speakers to learn, since success is the sum of small efforts repeated day in and day out. Ganbarou!
0 Replies
 
 

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