3
   

Simple question

 
 
Reply Sat 30 Jul, 2016 08:05 am
Which one of them is good If I want to say that I know nobody :
I don't know nobody/no one here.
I don't know everybody here
I do know nobody/ no one here.

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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 982 • Replies: 6
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fresco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 30 Jul, 2016 09:07 am
@58podejscie,
None of them!
Either
I don't know anybody here.
or
I don't know any of you.
are two possible alternatives.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  0  
Reply Sat 30 Jul, 2016 09:38 am
@58podejscie,
I know nobody/no one here
I don't know anybody/anyone here

"I don't know everybody here" means "I know one or more of the people here, but not everbody".
0 Replies
 
58podejscie
 
  0  
Reply Sat 30 Jul, 2016 12:57 pm
Well , then what is the difference between anyone and no one and anybody ?
That's all. Thanks for help.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Jul, 2016 02:57 pm
@58podejscie,
58podejscie wrote:
Well , then what is the difference between anyone and no one and anybody ?

"Anyone" and "anybody" mean "any person". "No one" and "nobody" mean "no person". If you want to talk about an complete absence or lack of something you can either:

1. Negate a word or phrase using "any" : I don't want any cars in my garden; I don't hear anyone speaking; I did not have any money (or I had not any money). I don't see anywhere to hang my coat.

OR:

2. Use a word or phrase starting starting with "no" e.g. no one, nobody, nowhere etc. In standard formal English (to do so would produce a double negative, which, confusingly, is often found in regional or colloquial speech). I want no cars in my garden; I hear no one speaking; I had no money; I see nowhere to hang my coat.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Jul, 2016 12:54 am
@contrex,
I missed out some words:

58podejscie wrote:
Well , then what is the difference between anyone and no one and anybody ?

"Anyone" and "anybody" mean "any person". "No one" and "nobody" mean "no person". If you want to talk about an complete absence or lack of something you can either:

1. Negate a word or phrase using "any" : I don't want any cars in my garden; I don't hear anyone speaking; I did not have any money (or I had not any money). I don't see anywhere to hang my coat.

OR:

2. Use a word or phrase starting starting with "no" e.g. no one, nobody, nowhere etc. In standard formal English it is not negated (to do so would produce a double negative, which, confusingly, is often found in regional or colloquial speech). I want no cars in my garden; I hear no one speaking; I had no money; I see nowhere to hang my coat.

0 Replies
 
selectmytutor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Aug, 2016 11:41 pm
@58podejscie,
I don't know anybody here.
0 Replies
 
 

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