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What are we talking about?

 
 
KaJe
 
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 05:02 am
In my mother language, it’s sometimes said, literally, “(Then) what are we talking about, still/even now?” “Still” or something else is intended to express that this talk now is already over the point till it is worth to last. So I rather should say “(Then) why are we talking about it even now?” Or “Why are we keeping talking about it?” Because things have become alredy too evident to keep talking about them. So, suppose somebody ask you if you should left his job, and after he told you everything, you tell him: “So you say you hate your work, you hate everybody there, but you have a job offer elsewhere. It would be a much better job, with many kind people, it’s much more easier work and you would earn much more… So then what are we talking about (…)?” So I don't know how is it said exactly in English.
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Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 05:20 am
@KaJe,
Let's take first things first:

KaJe wrote:
In my mother language [commonly, in English, one says mother tongue, or native language], it’s sometimes said, literally, “(Then) what are we talking about, still/even now?” “Still” or something else is intended to express that this talk now is already past the point of discussion. [That last clause is difficult, i'm not sure what you meant to say,] So should I say ["rather" has no place in that clause] “(Then) why are we talking about it even now?” Or “Why do we keep talking about it?” Because things have become already too evident to keep talking about them. So, suppose somebody asks you if he should leave his job, and after he told you everything, you tell him: “So you say you hate your work, you hate everybody there, but you have a job offer elsewhere. It would be a much better job, with many kind people, it’s much (easier already means more easy, so more easier is redunant) easier work and you would earn much more… So then what are we talking about (…)?” So I don't know how is it said exactly in English.


There are a few ways to express that idea. I'd say "Why are we still talking about it?" or "Why are we still discussing it?"--might be the most common ways.

I know that many English speakers start sentences with "So," and it grates on my nerves. It's not necessarily wrong, but it's also not necessary. Ironically, it could best be used in your sentence: "So why are we still talking about it?"
KaJe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 05:40 am
@Setanta,
Sorry for the careless writing, and thanks very much!
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 05:41 am
@KaJe,
There is no need to apologize, and you're welcome.
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