Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 05:58 pm
I sure hope so. I've got one waiting to go into the oven.

And it had better be good because on this hot day it was very labor intensive. Salt it. Let it sit. Make the marinade. Marinate it. Let it sit. Make the sauce. Shred the cheese (okay, I cheated on this part). Broil it. Flip it. Broil it. Layer it. Bake it.

I should have checked the recipe before I bought the darn eggplant.

Tomorrow, we're going out.

I'm curious about your "not worth it" cooking experiences.

I'll let you know how mine turns out after dinner.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,981 • Replies: 18
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BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 06:06 pm
Boomerang
Making Indian Pudding, famous in New England, but vastly overrated. When I was a young bride, I spent hours making Indian Pudding for my Boston-Bred husband. When we tasted it, he thought it was wonderful. I said it tasted like baked squash. Bah!

---BBB

Two methods for making Indian Pudding:

Indian Pudding

The original American/Puritan Thanksgiving feast there was Indian pudding, made of corn meal and molasses boiled in a bag. Here is a modern version.

DIRECTIONS

Boil the milk in the top of a double boiler. Stir in the corn meal and cook for about twenty minutes over boiling water. Then add the molasses and cook for another five minutes. Remove from the fire and add the butter, salt, spices, the egg beaten, and the raisins if used.

Pour into a greased baking dish and bake at 300° F. for two hours. If you would have a soft center, pour the milk over the top. Serve with Hard Sauce (see recipe) or cream, though it is a New England custom to serve the pudding with vanilla ice cream.

Recipe Source: Feast Day Cookbook by Katherine Burton and Helmut Ripperger, David McKay Company, Inc., New York, 1951

Wouldn't it be nice if the recipe included the ingredient amounts?
---BBB

--------------------------------------

Courtesy of Publick House Historic Resort
Sturbridge, Massachusetts

Indian Pudding

1 quart milk
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup cornmeal
3 eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablesppon cinnamon
1-1/2 teaspoons ginger
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup molasses

Bring milk and butter to a boil. Add cornmeal and stir constantly until smooth, well blended, and slightly thickened. Remove from stove, add eggs, sugar, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and molasses. Mix well together and put into a baking dish about 2" deep. Cover with wax paper.

Bake approximately one hour at 400 degrees in a pan of water or until wax paper can be lifted without pudding sticking to it. Serve hot with vanilla ice cream on top.

Yield: 6. Cooking time: 45 minutes.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 06:13 pm
Hi BBB.

I remember loving eggplant parmesean so I'm hoping that my expectations aren't too high.

As to overrated food - Kobe beef is something I've tried and didn't really think worth it.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 06:29 pm
mmmmmmm, I love almost all things eggplant.
I had a question at Cooks Talk looking for eggplant recipes. Got some great responses.

link
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 06:32 pm
eggplants suck, look like sumthin Gus would eat.


BBB-Indian Pudding. we just had some tonight. Its a fall food that is best enjoyed when the weather changes to cold. You heat it and slop on some really sweet whipped cream (not creme freshe-that stuff is like eating shaving cream)

I remember from my drinking days that a sweet sauterne (If they still make Chateau Yqem-) That is a wonderful accompaniment to Indian Pudding. I can still taste the wine. It brang out the wonderfulness of the molasses taste in the pudding..
Never make Indian Pudding, the best in the world is made by Looks Canning in Cutler Maine. Ill check if they have a web site. I know theyve been sold to some European outfit, who, I hope, will not screw with the recipe.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 06:34 pm
You're allergic to shellfish!?

How do you live?

I'm trying that recipe next.

Thank you for the link eBeth! There are a LOT of good recipies and ideas there.

Here is one of my favorites, very easy:

Slice, marinate and grill the eggplant.
Spread with hummus.
Toss on some feta.
Roll it into a burrito type thing.
Enjoy!
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 06:39 pm
mmmmmm hummous
i can't survive without some hummous in the fridge - for dipping veggies, on cheese sarnies ...
one of the managers at work makes some killer hummous that he brings for lunch. killer killer killer. i told him i'd buy him a vat to make more in.

actually the whole world of middle eastern dips and spreads makes me happy. There is a poster at Cooks Talk who lives in Greece now - she tests Mediterranean recipes for cookbook authors - man, does she have some amazing recipes!
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 07:21 pm
Grilled eggplant...mmm simple and delicious. Just smear slices with olive oil and garlic, S & P and toss em on the grill with any other veggies you can find. Some sliced tomatoes, rice and a crisp white wine. That's good eats.
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 07:22 pm
That is good eats, swimp!

How in the heck have you been?
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 07:47 pm
Spread a little thin, but otherwise doing fine, boomer. Thanks for asking. It's good to see you around more.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 09:41 pm
Its good to see you Swimpy. I've been spread a bit thin lately too but things are calming down so I've got time to hang out a bit more.

The eggplant parmesean turned out to be worth it - it was really good. Still, I think it will be a cold weather, nothing to do today treat next time.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 10:20 pm
I have read you don't have to salt the young fresh eggplant...
not sure though.
I never salt it, but the only recipe I use is one from an old Craig Claiborne cookbook, which I may or may not have typed out and added to a2k some time ago, who knows. I'll go a hunting, because I am not sure where I put the cookbook and I sort of wing it now.

Back later.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2004 10:26 pm
Here it is, it has its own wee little a2k thread -
http://www.able2know.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=17425&highlight=eggplant+rice
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 06:19 pm
That does sound great, osso! Thanks!

I love a quick, easy recipe with ingredients you don't use every day - like eggplant - it adds kind of a neat twist to a meal.

I've been cooking a lot of kolbari (spelling?) lately since I can get it fresh and beautiful from the farmer's market. I thnk that your recipe would be good using kolbari too.
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 07:16 pm
Do you mean kohlrabi? I like it raw too.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 07:20 pm
That's it! Kohlrabi! I haven't tried it raw - how dumb am I? Do you use a dip or anything?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 08:18 pm
Hmmm, yeh. I bet that recipe works for a lot of veggies...
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 10:21 pm
Yep cut 'em up and dip 'em in whatever kind of dip you like.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 04:18 pm
@Swimpy,
I was looking up my old eggplant and rice recipe and found this thread -

six years passed, and I still haven't tried kohlrabi....
0 Replies
 
 

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