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Boiling vegetables/Nutrients

 
 
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2004 12:06 am
I read today on wholehealthmd.com, that boiling broccoli "results in a loss of vitamin C and allows about half of the indole content to escape".

I made broccoli chicken soup with carrots today and, just out of curiosity, I decided to research further and find out whether all the nutrients that are released when boiling the vegetables are retained in the water, and therefore still absorbed by the body when drank.

But then again, on a second thought, it's late, I'm tired and I want the easy way out of this one (a.k.a. A2K).

Anybody care to share some knowledge?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 2,020 • Replies: 6
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2004 12:22 am
I think some are destroyed with boiling and perhaps even with simmering, and that may be useful in deciding to eat only 'al dente' broccoli as opposed to either raw or waycooked.

I don't know the answer. The end point of never cooking anything is rather gruesome to me, but perhaps attractive to raw food purists.

For many of us, the advantage of eating vegies both extremely fresh and raw can be accomodated with great salads and some appetizers, and we give in to some vitamin loss with the cooked vegies... but then, there is more to life than vitamins.. cooked vegies have a long and delicious history, with and without meat by their side.
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superjuly
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2004 12:38 am
ossobuco wrote:

For many of us, the advantage of eating vegies both extremely fresh and raw can be accomodated with great salads and some appetizers, and we give in to some vitamin loss with the cooked vegies... but then, there is more to life than vitamins...



Here's another quote from that same web site: "some of the nutrients in carrots are more easily absorbed when the vegetable has been cooked, even briefly." Which makes me think that it's not such a bad thing to cook them.

Thank you for the post, though the question remains.
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2004 07:11 am
Part of the problem is that water soluble vitamins -- the B vitamins, vit C, folic acid -- are leached out during the boiling. I don't know if steaming alleviates this or not. Carrots have a lot of vit D, which is not water soluble -- so it may be that cooking breaks up the structure of the vegetable to make the nutrients more accessible.

B1 and folic acid (and probably others) are also damaged by heat.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2004 07:33 am
Water soluble is as water soluble does. In a broth, you will still get the nutrients. If not, that's what they make supplements for. Personally, I consider it a minor concern, aside from a backdoor attempt to sell supplements.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2004 07:36 am
Do some research, balance your foods, and if your doctor suggests supplements for a specific problem beyond a daily multivitamin with minerals, don't worry about it.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2004 09:22 am
peekng in - I'll be back.
0 Replies
 
 

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