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What if we capture Sadaam?

 
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2003 06:37 am
Any court that allows a verdict to be the prerequisite for its existence is a kangaroo court.

Which I fully hope and expect it to be.

I'm wondering how the Administration will take that having fought so hard against the court's conception.
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mamajuana
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2003 02:04 pm
And what if the Saudis or someone convinces him to leave the country before any hostilities? What do we do then?

Or, what if he decides on a scorched earth policy, then disappears in a Hitler bunker or spirited away?

Many possibilities - he has not survived so long without being cunning, devious, and sly. We never got binLaden, did we?
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Lash Goth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2003 02:12 pm
I am completely confident that even if the court is Miss Smith's sixth grade Government Class, the parade of Iraqis who would recount Saddam's crimes will convince of his guilt.

Where is irrelevant. Who assumes control of the proceedings, to me, is irrelevant. What to do with Saddam, in the absence of dictatorial power and nuke holding....irrelevant.
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Equus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Jan, 2003 11:43 am
Craven, responding to comment on page 1; Oops. I must have been sleepy. I read Hussein, but I 'saw' bin Laden. In the words of Emily Litella, "Nevermind."

And I'm really kidding. I'm actually not in favor of capital punishment.
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2003 05:45 pm
The guy collects 25 million bucks. c.i.
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Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Feb, 2003 12:28 pm
perhaps he might become the president of the united states of america
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Feb, 2003 12:45 pm
"And lead us not into temptation. But deliver us from evil. "
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Feb, 2003 01:55 pm
Steve, That's a frightening thought; but if our citizenry is ready to vote for and support GWBush, that idea is not that far fetched. c.i.
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Jboak
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Dec, 2003 11:36 am
sadaam captured
this subject might be too old to reply to, but i'll try anyway,
so he's captured, wow,,,,all those people's lives,,,,due to his ruling,
Iraq now must take one giant step forward,,,,
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Dec, 2003 11:43 am
I'm sure many new threads regarding the future of Iraq and the USA in light of Saddam's capture will be posted shortly there Jboak. Welcome to A2K!
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Dec, 2003 01:08 pm
Jboak, WELCOME to A2K. Another interesting aspect of his capture is the expected uptick in the market tomorrow - not only in the US, but around the world. Wonder how long this 'optimism' will carry the market?
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Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2003 11:08 pm
cicerone imposter wrote:
Another interesting aspect of his capture is the expected uptick in the market tomorrow - not only in the US, but around the world. Wonder how long this 'optimism' will carry the market?


Our markets responded 'favourably'. I suppose if they let him go and capture him on a regular basis then the all-ordinaries should go through the roof.

Am I the only one that thinks that this stock-market stuff is the biggest bunch of crap since Rollo the Elephant accidently ate some laxatives??
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Wildflower63
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2004 05:45 pm
Mr Stillwater wrote:
cicerone imposter wrote:
Am I the only one that thinks that this stock-market stuff is the biggest bunch of crap since Rollo the Elephant accidently ate some laxatives??


Not sure exactly what you mean, but I also see some problem with our stock market. One president ignored many things, even the brewing of the problem with Iraq until it could not be ignored. I do not see any president as responsible for stock market gain or loss.

We have something called free enterprise, which government is completely separate from, which greatly differs from Communism. Under this sort of government, they do have the ultimate control over business practice. I don't think we are Communist just yet and should stop equating presidents with credit or discredit over economy that they have no control over, just the private sector.
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2004 05:50 pm
Wildflower, I did not write what you gave me credit for. Not my "style" of writing.
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2004 05:53 pm
BTW, Wildflower, I usually don't give credit for our economic performance to any president, but this president likes to claim that his tax cuts would increase jobs by 2.6 million this year. He renegged on this during the past couple of days, but I don't credit him with telling the truth on most subjects.
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Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2004 06:04 pm
I will take full responsibility for the comment, with the qualifier that struck me when I re-read it "I wrote that? It's quite Shakespearian, isn't it?".
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Wildflower63
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2004 06:08 pm
Stillwater, I understood this quote to be of insight. I am very happy to hear that people don't buy credit that politicans will claim, but do not deserve. Obviously others have the same thought about politics. It's a game!
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Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2004 06:37 pm
Wil'fleur - so is the stock market! It's really nothing more than a big boys' version of 3 card monte. Keep watching the figures moving around and around while the real action takes place hidden right in front of your eyes!

It's all based on confidence. There are no 'real goods' to be bought and sold, just the perception that a purchase now will ensure a profit later (or offset an earlier loss). To keep this all going everyone lies through their teeth about what the real financial state of play is. If we lost confidence in the proceedings then the entire market would go the way of the dinosaur.


And by the way, Rollo's 'offerings' are actually handy for creating something lasting!
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2004 06:57 pm
Mr Still, I'm not as pessimistic about the stock market as you are. Private capital are owned by the people, and not by the government. The government owes money through their bond sales, but it's still essentially funded by the people. We require capital investment to create businesses that in turn hire people to earn money. It's all part of the necessary evil of capitalism. Prices of stocks are usually based on potential future earnings more than it does on current earnings. Many pay dividends to its share holders. Many stocks have performed well even during the past three years. Essentially, stocks have provided the greatest return on investment, and money (in savings or certificates of deposits) have earned the least during the past almost 100 years. There's a manner to this madness if you understand the long term performance of stocks, bonds, and money. Our investments have done reasonably well during the past twenty-five years, so we're in a position to retire quite comfortably.
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Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2004 07:55 pm
C.I. my view on that is that the brokerage of stocks, bonds, cash and forex has yielded the best return over the last 100 years. If the people who buy and sell on the market were deprived of this 'occupation' they would be out robbing the dead of their gold teeth (or in politics).
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