19
   

Those Dark Spots on Pluto

 
 
mesquite
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 10:35 am
@edgarblythe,
More info on that pic here.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 10:50 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

A 2nd totally different mountain range discovered on Pluto, scientists baffled (PHOTOS)
https://www.rt.com/news/310563-pluto-mountain-range-found/
http://cdn.rt.com/files/2015.07/original/55b0cadbc46188bd1c8b4603.jpg
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 10:51 am
@mesquite,
Thank you.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 11:49 am
@Setanta,
Setanta, you are picking a fight with no one.

No one is disagreeing with anything you have said. There are differences between the Pluto/Charon system and the Earth/Moon system. And there are similarities between the two systems. You can have discussions about both without people attacking each other.

We objected to the fact that you had to jump all over Frank, for no reason, and then start name calling. You are correct in what you are saying... except for the part of about how "stupid" everyone else here is.

Can we have a discussion without the name calling? (If you can write a post without using the words "stupid" and "asshole" it would be a good start).
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 01:40 pm
Still trying to pick a fight, i see.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 01:47 pm
From PBS, http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/nasas-kepler-telescope-locates-closest-copy-earth/][b]Earth-like planets found by the Kepler telescope[/b] (well, sorta, kinda, no-not-really.

http://newshour-tc.pbs.org/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/pia19830-main-earthlikeexoplanets_0722-1024x576.jpg

That's our home on the right.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 02:17 pm
I knew the one on the right is ours, because I could see Tomball through the clouds.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 02:19 pm
It's amazing to me how eager people are to say that this or that exoplanet is like earth. Today's candidate has five times the mass as does the earth, and twice the gravity. I think it's future as a resort planet for Earthlings is very limited.
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 02:25 pm
@Setanta,
What I had seen on it was (I'm going to get the term wrong, I bet) that the system was - possibly - in the midst of superheating and it was probably not so nice there anymore.

Here it is - http://gizmodo.com/this-is-the-most-earth-like-planet-ever-discovered-1719724534 - the star is aging and brightening so the planet (if it had water in the first place) is in the midst of losing it.

/hunts around for new place for science fiction story to take place in/ <-- I like Kepler 438-b
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/01/16/exoplanet-earth-astronomy-kepler/21891137/
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 02:40 pm
Mostly, the 'like Earth' stories seem like wishful thinking, to me.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 05:52 pm
@jespah,
Cool stuff, Jessalonika, thanks . . .
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 06:27 pm
@Setanta,
1400 light yeaars. That kepler gizmo must be some damn good piece of tubing. Bet it has a Canon refractor

At 90% {c} itd take 1550 years to reach it.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2015 06:34 pm
Now for a musical interlude . . .

0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jul, 2015 12:26 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
From PBS, Earth-like planets found by the Kepler telescope (well, sorta, kinda, no-not-really.

http://newshour-tc.pbs.org/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/pia19830-main-earthlikeexoplanets_0722-1024x576.jpg

That's our home on the right.

Apparently a planet with double the Earth's mass is considered the most desirable size for terrestrial life (at least with the current degree of knowledge possessed by our scientists).

http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1401/1401.2392.pdf

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/superhabitable-planets
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jul, 2015 12:34 am

Screensaver Images Have Arrived:

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/01_Stern_01.jpg
1920 x 1080:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/01_Stern_01.jpg

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/01_Stern_02a_Pluto_Nat_Color.jpg
1920 x 1080:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/01_Stern_02a_Pluto_Nat_Color.jpg

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/01_Stern_02b_Pluto_Nat_Color.jpg
1920 x 1080:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/01_Stern_02b_Pluto_Nat_Color.jpg

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/01_Stern_02c_Pluto_Nat_Color.jpg
1920 x 1080:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/01_Stern_02c_Pluto_Nat_Color.jpg
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jul, 2015 12:36 am
Quote:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/02_Summers_01b_HazeImage.jpg

Just seven hours after closest approach, New Horizons aimed its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) back at Pluto, capturing sunlight streaming through the atmosphere and revealing hazes as high as 80 miles (130 kilometers) above Pluto's surface. A preliminary analysis of the image shows two distinct layers of haze -- one about 50 miles (80 kilometers) above the surface and the other at an altitude of about 30 miles (50 kilometers).

"The hazes detected in this image are a key element in creating the complex hydrocarbon compounds that give Pluto's surface its reddish hue," said Michael Summers, New Horizons co-investigator at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

Models suggest the hazes form when ultraviolet sunlight breaks up methane gas particles -- a simple hydrocarbon in Pluto's atmosphere. The breakdown of methane triggers the buildup of more complex hydrocarbon gases, such as ethylene and acetylene, which also were discovered in Pluto's atmosphere by New Horizons. As these hydrocarbons fall to the lower, colder parts of the atmosphere, they condense into ice particles that create the hazes. Ultraviolent sunlight chemically converts hazes into tholins, the dark hydrocarbons that color Pluto's surface.

Scientists previously had calculated temperatures would be too warm for hazes to form at altitudes higher than 20 miles (30 kilometers) above Pluto's surface.

"We're going to need some new ideas to figure out what's going on," said Summers.

Quote:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/04_McKinnon_02a.jpg
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/04_McKinnon_02c.jpg

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/04_McKinnon_03a.jpg
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-Conferences/2015-07-24/resources/highRes_1920x1080/04_McKinnon_03c.jpg

The New Horizons mission also found in LORRI images evidence of exotic ices flowing across Pluto's surface and revealing signs of recent geologic activity, something scientists hoped to find but didn't expect.

The new images show fascinating details within the Texas-sized plain, informally named Sputnik Planum, which lies within the western half of Pluto's heart-shaped feature, known as Tombaugh Regio. There, a sheet of ice clearly appears to have flowed -- and may still be flowing -- in a manner similar to glaciers on Earth.

"We've only seen surfaces like this on active worlds like Earth and Mars," said mission co-investigator John Spencer of SwRI. "I'm really smiling."

Additionally, new compositional data from New Horizons' Ralph instrument indicate the center of Sputnik Planum is rich in nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane ices.

"At Pluto's temperatures of minus-390 degrees Fahrenheit, these ices can flow like a glacier," said Bill McKinnon, deputy leader of the New Horizons Geology, Geophysics and Imaging team at Washington University in St. Louis. "In the southernmost region of the heart, adjacent to the dark equatorial region, it appears that ancient, heavily-cratered terrain has been invaded by much newer icy deposits."

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php?page=20150724
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Sat 25 Jul, 2015 03:42 am
Jimi Hendrix song - Pluto Haze.
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Sat 25 Jul, 2015 05:09 am
Marvelous pictures, Everyone. My thanks to everyone who has taken the time to find and post any pictures here.

An incredible achievement.

I never thought I'd see anything like this in my lifetime.

I am in awe!
0 Replies
 
mesquite
 
  3  
Reply Wed 29 Jul, 2015 10:56 am
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/nh-pluto-in-false-color.jpg
Quote:
New Horizons scientists use enhanced color images to detect differences in the composition and texture of Pluto’s surface. When close-up images are combined with color data from the Ralph instrument, it paints a new and surprising portrait of the dwarf planet. The “heart of the heart,” Sputnik Planum, is suggestive of a source region of ices. The two bluish-white “lobes” that extend to the southwest and northeast of the “heart” may represent exotic ices being transported away from Sputnik Planum.

Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with color data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced color global view. The images, taken when the spacecraft was 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers) away, show features as small as 1.4 miles (2.2 kilometers).

Image Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/pluto-dazzles-in-false-color
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Saturn as seen by Cassini - Discussion by littlek
New Comet May Be Observers' Dream Come True - Discussion by Zarathustra
Are you ready for the solar eclipse Sunday? - Question by Lustig Andrei
Red dwarf stars and their planets - Discussion by gungasnake
Geology and astronomy combined - Question by Lapetus
Total Solar eclipse of August 21, 2017 - Discussion by rosborne979
physics - Discussion by usmankhalid665
A Series of Humbling Pictures - Discussion by edgarblythe
The Early Universe - Question by piratejack5150
Universal Census of the Universe - Discussion by tsarstepan
More new planets in from ESO - Discussion by littlek
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 05/23/2022 at 11:11:07