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Red dwarf stars and their planets

 
 
Reply Sat 17 Aug, 2013 08:18 am
http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/science-habitable-planets-red-dwarfs-milky-way-01188.html

Quote:
According to a new study reported in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, there may be as many as 60 billion planets in the so-called habitable zone around red dwarf stars in our galaxy Milky Way alone – double what was previously thought.......
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Sat 17 Aug, 2013 09:01 pm

That's good news. Red dwarfs are stable and VERY long lived.

The lifespan of a single red dwarf will see dozens of generations pass for any other star type.

Once this solar system is kaput, assuming we aren't already extinct, we could do worse than to move to an unassuming red dwarf star for our new home. It might even last us until the vacuum metastability disaster comes.

Plus, the fact that red dwarfs are so numerous and unassuming means that any hostile alien species might not even bother to notice us.
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sat 17 Aug, 2013 10:02 pm

I don't believe that there is much chance
that we r alone in the galaxy,
but we 'll be safer if there is no alien life.
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Aug, 2013 10:24 pm
@oralloy,
Evidence indicates that modern humans already have a historyof living on bodies in orbit around dwarf stars...

http://able2know.org/topic/220170-1
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Aug, 2013 10:26 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
It appears to be a safe bet that the kinds of creatures which have lived on this planet, both recently and in the past, are the only kinds of creatures you'd ever see no matter how far out you went.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 04:47 am
@gungasnake,
HA! What passes for evidence at Gunga's house is truly entertaining.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 05:20 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:
Evidence indicates that modern humans already have a history of living on bodies in orbit around dwarf stars...

Putting aside for the moment the fact that the evidence shows no such thing, how do you propose that the people (and other animals) showed up on those other planets in the first place?
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 05:25 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:

http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/science-habitable-planets-red-dwarfs-milky-way-01188.html

Quote:
According to a new study reported in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, there may be as many as 60 billion planets in the so-called habitable zone around red dwarf stars in our galaxy Milky Way alone – double what was previously thought.......


Given what we know about stellar evolution and solar system formation, that doesn't surprise me at all.

Virtually every star is likely to have planets around it and virtually every large gas giant (brown dwarf) is likely to have lots of moons (some the size of planets) around them. And every flavor of "star" in between the dwarfs and giants are likely to have them. All because of standard stellar evolutionary mechanisms. None of this should be surprising and I doubt scientists are much surprised by it. It's just now that we're starting to get actual evidence in support of the standard theories.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  4  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 05:27 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:
It appears to be a safe bet that the kinds of creatures which have lived on this planet, both recently and in the past, are the only kinds of creatures you'd ever see no matter how far out you went.

What makes you say that? By what mechanism do you propose that the same basic biology has spread or arisen on all those other places?
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 07:48 am
Standard theories of stellar evolution are dying like flies.

The universe turns out to be upwards of 99% plasma and about the only thing which in real life forms plasma into more solid objects (galaxies, stars, planets, moons...) are cosmic Birkeland currents and the pinch effect which occurs in Birkeland currents.
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 10:28 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:
Standard theories of stellar evolution are dying like flies.

That is incorrect.

The Big Bang standard model is still the most accurate and the best fit with the evidence, including when it is compared to Plasma Cosmology (which has serious flaw when it comes to compatibility with evidence).

When you find something that fits the evidence better than the Big Bang then I'll be happy to listen, but so far you haven't. I've read the material on Plasma Cosmology, it fails.
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 12:33 pm
@rosborne979,
Quote:
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:
Standard theories of stellar evolution are dying like flies.

That is incorrect.

The Big Bang standard model is still the most accurate and the best fit with the evidence


That is incorrect. Big Bang is basically bad theology and bad physics rolled into a package and should have been rejected on day one on purely philosophical grounds. Having all of the mas of the universe collapsed to a point would be the mother of all black holes; nothing would ever "bang(TM)" its way out of that.

That's before you even get to Halton Arp and he demise of the idea of interpreting cosmic redshift as distance and/or velocity, and the idea of an expanding univere which had no other basis than that misinterpretation of redshift, and the "Big Bang(TM)" which had no other basis than the flawed expanding universe idea.

http://bigbangneverhappened.org

http://www.haltonarp.com

http://electric-cosmos.org/arp.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mf5y6PJR5lE

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/esp_ciencia_haltonarp.htm

http://www.bueso.de/files/images/2012/NGC-7603-fix-resize_0.jpg

Example of very high and very low redshift objects which are clearly part and parcel of the same things, i.e. an absolute counter-example disproof of interpreting redshift as distance, expanding universe, and big bang.


0 Replies
 
 

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