Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2010 10:34 pm
i want to know that after the big bang occurs , where our glaxy going? what is velocity of of our glaxy?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 3,738 • Replies: 16
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Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2010 10:52 pm
@usmankhalid665,
Just remember that you're standing on a planet that's evolving
And revolving at nine hundred miles an hour,
That's orbiting at nineteen miles a second, so it's reckoned,
A sun that is the source of all our power.
The sun and you and me and all the stars that we can see
Are moving at a million miles a day
In an outer spiral arm, at forty thousand miles an hour,
Of the galaxy we call the 'Milky Way'.
Our galaxy itself contains a hundred billion stars.
It's a hundred thousand light years side to side.
It bulges in the middle, sixteen thousand light years thick,
But out by us, it's just three thousand light years wide.
We're thirty thousand light years from galactic central point.
We go 'round every two hundred million years,
And our galaxy is only one of millions of billions
In this amazing and expanding universe.

The universe itself keeps on expanding and expanding
In all of the directions it can whizz
As fast as it can go, at the speed of light, you know,
Twelve million miles a minute, and that's the fastest speed there is.
So remember, when you're feeling very small and insecure,
How amazingly unlikely is your birth,
And pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space,
'Cause there's bugger all down here on Earth.

0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2010 02:13 am
@usmankhalid665,
After the last big bang, I had a little doze then wandered off to the kitchen for a bowl of cornflakes.

I would somehow like to think that glaxy did much the same thing.
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2010 02:26 am
@usmankhalid665,
We measure the speed of other galaxies by assuming we are stationary. The furthermost galaxies are going very fast, and the further out we investigate the faster they are. We will no longer know the speed of them when they approach the speed of light. We will no longer recieve info about them.
If we measure our speed relative to our neighbouring galaxies, we are doing 600km/sec.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 08:59 pm
@usmankhalid665,
usmankhalid665 wrote:

i want to know that after the big bang occurs , where our glaxy going? what is velocity of of our glaxy?

The galaxy went out to the 24 hour grocery store nearby to get a couple of pints of peppermint bark Haagen Daaz ice cream but since the entire universe is moving relative to itself the universe still hasn't arrived there making the velocity moot.
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High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 11:43 am
@Ionus,
The very distant galaxies are very dim to us but that's not because they're approaching the speed of light, it's just that they've been moving away for a very long time. We can still measure their red shift; and since we know the intervening space has been expanding at an accelerating rate the day will come when we won't be able to see them at all. As far as the speed of our own galaxy relative to the neighbors, Setanta's answer was correct - 600km/sec.
Ionus
 
  0  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 07:28 pm
@High Seas,
Quote:
Setanta's answer was correct - 600km/sec.
Ahhhh....HS ??? I cant find that post in this thread. Do you mean my answer was correct ?
Quote:
The very distant galaxies are very dim to us but that's not because they're approaching the speed of light
They are dim because of distance. I was referring to the universes very own event horizon, where if galaxies, relative to us, are travelling faster than the speed of light they will no longer be a part of our universe. They will cease to exist. When we eventually discover the galaxies close to that horizon, they will be going close to the speed of light.
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 08:42 pm
@Ionus,
I'm sorry - was going through threads quickly and confused your post with another one from another thread. Yes, your answer about our own galaxy's speed was correct. As to the distant galaxies: they' re moving away but not at anything close to the speed of light; the space between them and us is expanding, that's why their light will no longer reach us after some point - five or ten billion years in the future of our universe - nobody seems sure.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2010 08:52 pm
Re: original question

away from the point of origin of "Big Bang"


me, I'm sitting in front of my computer.
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Dec, 2010 12:54 am
@IRFRANK,
Actually I dont think there was an origin. More like a sudden condensation of cloud.
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Dec, 2010 10:08 pm
@Ionus,
Quote:
Actually I dont think there was an origin. More like a sudden condensation of cloud.


Hmm...

I've not really read much about the theory of the Big Bang. I just thought it was Leonard finally getting in to Penny's pants!

But really, I guess I assumed it was an explosion from some infinite mass.

It's all very hard for me to comprehend. Almost as hard as believing some all powerful being did it.

I did hear the other day that in a couple million years our galaxy and Andromeda are going to collide. That could cause us some problems.

Like I said. Hard to comprehend, but there are pictures of such things happening far far away.
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Dec, 2010 12:30 am
@IRFRANK,
Quote:
I just thought it was Leonard finally getting in to Penny's pants!
Very Happy Excellent show.

Quote:
I did hear the other day that in a couple million years our galaxy and Andromeda are going to collide.
That should be billion, I think.

Quote:
But really, I guess I assumed it was an explosion from some infinite mass.
It is usually explained as there was no space and time before it. I think this is incorrect. I think the 3 constructs of seperation, area and volume existed and matter/energy suddenly came into solution within the three constructs. This would be equally distributed and then came together as volume tried to crush matter back to where it came from (another dimension). This was the big bang. When the universes flyapart far enough the expansion of space will over expand and tear and it will all happen again. Big Bang, expansion, tear, big bang......in the meantime another dimension, life, gets a look in.

Some matter/energy exists in different levels of the constructs. Light is in seperation, the first one, and when it has an influence in the third, volume, it has a particle effect. There is a "three" feature to sub-atomic matter....this could be because the third construct is not always there so matter exists at this level in the second construct, area. It takes a minimum of three points to describe an area, therefore the preponderance of three.

We successfully live in the third construct, volume, made out of the solute dimension matter/energy into which another solute exists : life.

And there we are, many dimensions interacting and intersecting like so many waves in an ocean.

Or not. There are other possibilities with their own descriptions ..... Very Happy
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Dec, 2010 05:36 pm
@Ionus,
Quote:
And there we are, many dimensions interacting and intersecting like so many waves in an ocean.

Or not. There are other possibilities with their own descriptions ..... Very Happy



Well, everybody knows that.

duh

Razz
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Dec, 2010 05:53 pm
I just saw a video "The elegant universe" by Brian Greene. It goes into the history of gravity and string theory. It is very interesting.

The problem with string theory is that a young physicist accidently found that the Gamma Function by mathematician Euler that fit the description of the Strong force in the Standard Model. From this Gamma Function Michael Green and Swarzman worked on the string theory and got a consistent answer. Unlike Newton and Einstein who worked on physical models and developed the mathematics these string theorists found a short cut. From the mathematical equations they are trying to work out a physical model. There are problems with it as it doesn't explain the big bang theory very well. It solves a lot of other problems very nicely though.

Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Dec, 2010 06:12 pm
@talk72000,
Quote:
There are problems with it as it doesn't explain the big bang theory very well.
I would like to see what would happen if they had volume and area and seperation in existance and then they introduced matter/energy. It is always presumed space came into being with matter/energy. What if it was a collision of dimensions and the big bang was more like a huge puff , like condensation suddenly occurring everywhere.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Dec, 2010 06:36 pm
@Ionus,
accordign to the M-brane theory the big bang was the result of two branes colliding at a point. the branes are considered flexible. This creates problems as there could be many big bangs but there not been more than one big bang historically.
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Dec, 2010 07:15 pm
@talk72000,
They had to come up with branes to cover what I have been calling constructs for years before. The problem is calling something a dimension, whilst it explains it to lay folk, is very inaccurate.

Quote:
there could be many big bangs but there not been more than one big bang historically.
For a big bang to occur, there has to be an abscence of matter. That abscence eliminates any knowledge of prior times.
0 Replies
 
 

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