10
   

Three cheers for the FBI.

 
 
McTag
 
  4  
Reply Sun 7 Jun, 2015 01:18 pm

So we didn't have to suffer all those vuvuzelas?

Blatter's got to suffer for this.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Sun 7 Jun, 2015 01:41 pm
I sincerely hope that they give Andrew Jennings a ringside seat when these bastards appear in Court, so he can give them a little wave as they are escorted in.

He has obviously been a bit of a nuisance to Mr Warner over the years. Here are two such instances...



0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 7 Jun, 2015 04:56 pm
Gotta wonder if Putin would be thrilled if the World Cup was taken away, as it would show his people more evidence that making the pivot to China was the right call. The Russian people are going to conclude that paying bribes was the right thing to do, that this is how the system worked. Putin is not going to get jammed for playing along that much is sure. Anything that makes the West look petty, punitive and hypocritical makes Putins judgment look good. The West saying "I am Shocked. SHOCKED I TELL YOU that bribery was taking place in FIFA, and two out of the dozens of those who paid them must be punished" is going to go down poorly in much of the world.

If Russia and Qatar are able to seek redress in the courts so much the better.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Jun, 2015 05:17 pm
@hawkeye10,
You really are on the side of evil, the one thing that's constant. Redress in the courts isn't such a great option when there's evidence of bribery. They won't lose their bids unless the evidence is damning.

Looks like Morocco won the 2010 vote after all but the numbers were rigged. Give one of the cups to them.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 7 Jun, 2015 05:31 pm
Quote:
Such elites have enough self-awareness, Mr. Portnikov says, that “they understand that in the contemporary world, they are not masters but petty thieves… and if in politics they can show their weight with the help of death, then in ordinary life they have nothing to oppose criminal prosecution in the West, except perhaps for war.”



Mr. Putin has particular reason to understand this equation, the Ukrainian commentator says, as he rose to power because he, unlike others in Boris Yeltsin’s circle, showed himself able to prevent the first Russian president from having to face the criminal charges that he himself feared most.

“Now a similar danger threatens Putin himself or those closest to him,” and that is why he and his regime are reacting so sharply to the FIFA arrests, Mr. Portnikov says, adding that the whole case shows something else as well: “In the West, they understand where his button is” and how to push it.


http://www.ukrweekly.com/uwwp/fifa-corruption-trials-could-threaten-putins-hold-on-power-portnikov-says/

Of course we need to keep in mind that for years the Ukrainians have shown very little competence in anything, especially poltices, and that Putin has been the master for decades. I am not sure what Putin is up to re his public statements on FIFA and the World Cup, but I would not bet against him walking away with a win no matter what FIFA does. FOr sure I cant imagine Western courts condemning Russians working against Putin, as it would reinforce the logic of the pivot to China which has already taken place, and is increasingly is locked in with long term energy contracts, as well as other contracts.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Jun, 2015 05:36 pm
My strong impression is that the odor of payoffs and bribery had surrounded FIFA and Mr Blatter for a fairly long time. Perhaps we should ask ourselves just what is the likelihood that the intelligence and/or law enforcement agencies of multiple European, South Amrican and other countries has sufficient information on which to base some charges or at least a formal investigation. Similar things have happened before involving this and other activities in both national and multinational arenas. My bet is the odds are very high in the case of multiple nations involved. In short there are likely many individuals involved in activitiers ranging from active participation to passive but knowing toleration - all for a long time.

Just why the U.S. govertnment got involved now is something I don't profess to know. Moreover what may have influenced its motivation to investigate and press charges (or even the lack of inhibition from doing so) is something I don't know either. It is obvious that the public importance attached to the matter is a good deal less here than in most European nations or Brasil or Argentina for example, and that may well have made it easy for our government to make an issue out of it all, perhaps for unrelated reasons.

Anyway I suspect Mr Sepp Blatter will get (most of) what he deserves for all this, but that many others peripherally, but knowingly involved, will emerge unscathed.
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 7 Jun, 2015 05:39 pm
@georgeob1,
The West is going to pass up this opportunity to demand that Russia get whacked? So far the Brits and the Germans are onboard that plan, I dont know who else.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 01:36 am
@hawkeye10,
Unless there is evidence of bribery there's not much that can be done. Garcia was hampered by Russia "losing" a load of emails, and it's not down to the West or America but the footballing nations, the same ones who voted Blatter back in.

Admittedly there needs a shedload of reform, but we're not there yet and 2018 isn't very far away.
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 01:39 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
Unless there is evidence of bribery there's not much that can be done.
I am pretty sure these guys were dealing with wire transfers, not bags of diamonds. If so they will be brought to light if the investigators want to go to the work to do so.
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 01:43 am
@hawkeye10,
Garcia was hampered by missing emails, and there has been cases of money in brown envelopes changing hands. It's not all down to a lack of will, there are lots of decent hard working people in Fifa sick of the corruption.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 02:21 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

Garcia was hampered by missing emails, and there has been cases of money in brown envelopes changing hands. It's not all down to a lack of will, there are lots of decent hard working people in Fifa sick of the corruption.

Fifa making the beloved play in Qatar in Summer because Qatar was willing to pass around a lot of money has to be high on the list of why. That act by FIFA was the dictionary definition of hubris.

izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 02:44 am
@hawkeye10,
Your post seems completely disconnected to my own. You seem to be under the impression Fifa is one big monolithic entity. It's not, there's a world of difference between the elite on the executive and the ranks of middle management doing a good job who've never been offered a bribe because they're just not important enough. From Lordy's post.

Quote:
If Blatter’s downfall can be traced to a single moment, it is probably the one that came next. When the FIFA president finished his speech, Jennings grabbed the microphone and blurted out a deliberately outrageous question.

“I’m surrounded by all these terribly posh reporters in suits and silk ties and buttoned up shirts for God’s sake,” he remembered. “And here’s me in me hiking gear. I get the mike and I said, ‘Herr Blatter, have you ever taken a bribe?'”

“Talk about crashing the party,” Jennings recalled Tuesday. “Reporters are moving away from me as if I’ve just let out the biggest smell since bad food. Well, that’s what I wanted? Thank you, idiot reporters. The radar dish on top of my head is spinning around to all these blazers against the wall, saying, ‘Here I am. I’m your boy. I’m not impressed by these tossers. I know what they are. I’ve done it to the IOC, and I’ll do it to them.'”

The outcome was doubly golden. Blatter denied ever taking a bribe, which gave Jennings a great headline. But he also got the goods. “Six weeks later I’m in the dark at about midnight down where the river in Zurich widens out into the lake, standing by a very impressive looking 19th-century office block, wondering why I’ve been asked to go there by somebody I don’t know when the door opens and I’m dragged in,” Jennings recalls. “I’m taken into a very posh set of offices … and within half an hour a senior FIFA official arrived carrying a wonderful armful of documents. And it ran from there. And it still does.”


It has been announced that the FBI's investigation will include the Russian and Qatari bids which is to be welcomed, but until such evidence is uncovered they will go ahead. Even if it is uncovered without the will in an unreconstructed Fifa it still could go ahead.

As for Fifa's hubris, the FA and the British press has been pointing that out for years, long before you were aware of it.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 12:15 pm
Critics pan FIFA film 'United Passions' as 'unwatchable' and 'cinematic excrement'
Quote:
The New York Times calls it "one of the most unwatchable films in recent memory, a dishonest bit of corporate-suite sanitizing that's not good even for laughs."

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/06/08/football/fifa-film-united-passions/
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 12:20 pm
@panzade,
I feel sorry for Tim Roth. What made him do it?
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 12:22 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

I feel sorry for Tim Roth. What made him do it?

A boatload of money?

Your sympathy is probably miss placed.
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 12:56 pm
@hawkeye10,
Who is she?
Lordyaswas
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 01:12 pm
In the meantime, the Jack Warner saga continues.....
Full Story, plus video...... http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-33056234

Jack Warner investigated over Haiti earthquake money

"The BBC can reveal that the former FIFA Vice President Jack Warner has been investigated by US prosecutors over the disappearance of money meant for victims of the Haiti earthquake.
He visited the country in 2010 and raised $750,000 from FIFA and the Korean Football Association to help rebuild the country after the disaster.
Mr Warner is facing extradition from Trinidad and Tobago to stand trial in the US on allegations of corruption and bribery. He denies all the charges.
Ed Thomas reports from Trinidad and Tobago."
Ragman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 01:16 pm
@Lordyaswas,
I hear also that he killed Jimmy Hoffa.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 01:19 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Quote:
"The BBC can reveal that the former FIFA Vice President Jack Warner has been investigated by US prosecutors over the disappearance of money meant for victims of the Haiti earthquake.

Miss spent or down right stolen Haitian charity funds is the rule, not the exception. Our courts dont have room to prosecute all of the offenders, and justice does not allow selective prosecution.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jun, 2015 01:23 pm
@hawkeye10,
Oh, well because it's the norm...then it's OK...they don't deserve any better.
So, 'cause Haiti forever has had corrupt incompetent thieves that have been running their nation, it's OK if an outside crook steals their disaster relief funds?

There's a rumor tennis great, Serena Williams, is really a Haitian.
0 Replies
 
 

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