10
   

Three cheers for the FBI.

 
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 05:04 am
@Lordyaswas,
That reminded me of one of Homer Simpson's lines. When Marge said she did something because of Christian Charity, Homer asked what a porn star had to do with it.
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 05:10 am
@izzythepush,
Have you seen the various headlines today? Good old journos.

"Head on a Blatter"

"Game, Sepp and Match"


Love it.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 08:38 am
@Lordyaswas,
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03327/portal-MATT_3327269b.jpg
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 09:02 am
THE WASHINGTON POST:

How a curmudgeonly old reporter exposed the FIFA scandal that toppled Sepp Blatter


The biggest news story of the year was breaking, but the journalist responsible was fast asleep.

It was just after dawn on May 27 when Andrew Jennings’s phone began ringing. Swiss police had just launched a startling raid on a luxury hotel in Zurich, arresting seven top FIFA officials and charging them and others with running a $150 million racket. The world was stunned.

The waking world, that is. If Jennings had bothered to climb out of bed, he wouldn’t have been surprised at the news. After all, he was the man who set the investigation in motion, with a book in 2006, “FOUL! The Secret World of FIFA: Bribes, Vote Rigging and Ticket Scandals,” followed by an exposé aired on the BBC’s “Panorama” program that same year, and then another book in 2014, called “Omerta: Sepp Blatter’s FIFA Organised Crime Family.”

“My phone started ringing at six in the morning,” Jennings said Tuesday from his farm in the hilly north of England. “I turned it off actually to get some more sleep, because whatever is happening at six in the morning is still going to be there at lunch time, isn’t it?”

If you can’t tell already, Jennings is an advocate of slow, methodical journalism. For half a century, the 71-year-old investigative reporter has been digging into complex, time-consuming stories about organized crime. In the 1980s, it was bad cops, the Thai heroin trade and the Italian mob. In the ’90s, he turned to sports, exposing corruption with the International Olympic Committee.

For the past 15 years, Jennings has focused on the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), international soccer’s governing body. As other journalists were ball watching — reporting scorelines or writing player profiles — Jennings was digging into the dirty deals underpinning the world’s most popular game.

“Credit in this saga should go to the dogged obsession of a single reporter, Andrew Jennings,” the Guardian’s Simon Jenkins wrote last week, citing in particular Jennings’s BBC “Panorama” film called “The Beautiful Bung: Corruption and the World Cup.”

Now, after decades of threats, suspicions about tapped phones and intermittent paychecks, Jennings is being vindicated with every twist and turn in the FIFA scandal.

[Interpol issues ‘red notices’ for 6 people tied to the scandal: Who they are and what that means]

During a phone interview with The Washington Post on Tuesday morning, he called FIFA President Sepp Blatter “a dead man walking.” Two hours later, Blatter announced he was stepping down, just days after being re-elected.

“I know that they are criminal scum, and I’ve known it for years,” he said. “And that is a thoughtful summation. That is not an insult. That is not throwing about wild words.”

“These scum have stolen the people’s sport. They’ve stolen it, the cynical thieving bastards,” he said. “So, yes, it’s nice to see the fear on their faces.”

A ‘document hound’

The best way for Americans to imagine Andrew Jennings is to roll Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein together, then add a touch of a Scottish burr and plenty of flannel. Jennings was born in Scotland but moved to London as a child. His grandfather played for a prominent London soccer team, Clapton Orient (now called Leyton Orient), but Jennings had little interest in the sport. He did, however, have a nose for journalism.

After finishing school, Jennings joined the Sunday Times in London, where he got a taste of investigative journalism. He went to work for the BBC, but when the network wouldn’t air his documentary on corruption within Scotland Yard, he quit and joined a rival program called “World in Action.” He turned his police investigation into his first book, “Scotland Yard’s Cocaine Connection,” and a documentary.

“I’m a document hound. If I’ve got your documents, I know all about you,” he said. “This journalism business is easy, you know. You just find some disgraceful, disgustingly corrupt people and you work on it! You have to. That’s what we do. The rest of the media gets far too cozy with them. It’s wrong. Your mother told you what was wrong. You know what’s wrong. Our job is to investigate, acquire evidence.”

That is, essentially, Jennings’s mantra: Take time, dig up dirt and don’t trust those in power. He applied the same logic to international drug smuggling rings and Italian mafiosi.

Then sports. After the Scotland Yard exposé, a colleague at “World In Action” named Paul Greengrass — who later became a Hollywood filmmaker, directing several Jason Bourne films as well as the recent blockbuster “Captain Phillips” — suggested investigating the IOC.

“I said, ‘What’s that?'” Jennings remembers. Soon, however, the clueless sports fan would become steeped in the inner workers of the Olympic committee. “When I looked into the IOC, I discovered the president, Juan Antonio Samaranch, who was universally sucked up to by the sports press, was a Franco fascist. He thought the wrong side won World War II.” (Samaranch admitted to serving as Spanish dictator Francisco Franco’s sports minister but claimed he was not a fascist at heart.)

Jennings wrote a trilogy of books about a series of alleged boondoggles, bribes and drug controversies that culminated in the scandal surrounding the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, where dozens of IOC members were expelled or sanctioned for wrongdoing. He said that most sports reporters wouldn’t touch these subjects for fear of losing access to top officials and athletes, or because it simply took too much time and effort. When Samaranch stepped down in 2001, Jennings decided to shift his focus. “By then I was aware that there was something very, very stinky at FIFA,” he said.

Looking for a fight with FIFA

From prior investigations and studying organized crime, Jennings knew he would need sources to crack open the secretive soccer association. “You know that everywhere, any organization, if there is any sign at all of how corrupt the people at the top are, there’s decent people down in the middle management, because they’ve got mortgages, they’ve got children to put through school,” Jennings said. “They are just employees and they will have a sense of proper morality. So you’ve got to get them to slip you the stuff out the back door. It used to be from the filing cabinet, now it’s from the server.”
So the Scotsman decided to ambush one of Blatter’s first news conferences after being re-elected in 2002. “I went to the press conference there in their Zurich headquarters,” he said. “Sloping all up the walls on either side was the employees, the robots all in their FIFA blazers with robotic faces, nothing to say, just lining the walls. So I said, ‘Right, they’re the ones I want. I’ve got to get the message to them that I’m here. I’ll cross the road for a fight. I want it. I’m looking for it.'”

If Blatter’s downfall can be traced to a single moment, it is probably the one that came next. When the FIFA president finished his speech, Jennings grabbed the microphone and blurted out a deliberately outrageous question.

“I’m surrounded by all these terribly posh reporters in suits and silk ties and buttoned up shirts for God’s sake,” he remembered. “And here’s me in me hiking gear. I get the mike and I said, ‘Herr Blatter, have you ever taken a bribe?'”

“Talk about crashing the party,” Jennings recalled Tuesday. “Reporters are moving away from me as if I’ve just let out the biggest smell since bad food. Well, that’s what I wanted? Thank you, idiot reporters. The radar dish on top of my head is spinning around to all these blazers against the wall, saying, ‘Here I am. I’m your boy. I’m not impressed by these tossers. I know what they are. I’ve done it to the IOC, and I’ll do it to them.'”

The outcome was doubly golden. Blatter denied ever taking a bribe, which gave Jennings a great headline. But he also got the goods. “Six weeks later I’m in the dark at about midnight down where the river in Zurich widens out into the lake, standing by a very impressive looking 19th-century office block, wondering why I’ve been asked to go there by somebody I don’t know when the door opens and I’m dragged in,” Jennings recalls. “I’m taken into a very posh set of offices … and within half an hour a senior FIFA official arrived carrying a wonderful armful of documents. And it ran from there. And it still does.”




Much more........
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/06/03/how-a-curmudgeonly-old-reporter-exposed-the-fifa-scandal-that-toppled-sepp-blatter/?tid=sm_fb
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 12:03 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Great post. Interesting reading.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 12:14 pm
@panzade,
Yep, he's a good old fashioned journo, who doesn't care who he upsets.

The only thing that the Washington Post got wrong, as far as I can see, is that they mentioned several times that he is Scottish and that he has a Scottish accent.
I think he moved down to London when he was six or so, and sounds about as Norf Lundun as one can get.

They probably thought the Scottish angle added a bit of romance, or it made him a bit more curmudgeonly or something.

Apart from that, it is a good article.


Here is Andrew speaking about various FIFA stuff.....a very interesting set of vids.

https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_JtaT4G0srYx-IS1dBOHstrtXoba0Vdm
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 02:10 pm
Blazer states that bribes were involved in the awarding of the 1998 World Cup to FRANCE.



From a Telegraph live feed article.......


"One of the biggest revelations thrown up by the transcript of Blazer's guilty plea, which has been made public, is that bribes were involved in the awarding of the 1998 World Cup to France.
That key quote from Blazer, then:
Quote During my association with FIFA and C0NCACAF, among other things, I and others agreed that I or a co-conspirator would commit at least two acts of racketeering activity. Among other things, I agreed with other persons in or around 1992 to faciitate the acceptance of a bribe in conjunction with the selection of the host nation for the 1998 World Cup."


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/sepp-blatter/11647665/Sepp-Blatter-FBI-investigation-live.html
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 02:24 pm
@Lordyaswas,
everybody is guilty, they either bribed or kept quiet about the practice. The rectitude of the West for some time now has been all about bludgeoning opponents and keeping the masses under the thumb of the elite, it has not been a code of conduct that is taken seriously by those who push it.

You wait and see, the Chinese will use the example of Fifa as they take over as the worlds lone superpower. The West can object to this changing of the guard all we want, moral and financial bankruptcy leaves us powerless to stop it, as well as impossible to take our objections seriously.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 02:27 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Let's see ... Qatar was awarded a 2022 FIFA World Cup event. There's a typical daily temperature of 100-110 deg F. Yup, that is acceptable, right? Most importantly, their currency doesn't melt. Is that all that matters?

Oh and BTW, Qatar soccer team has yet to qualify for a World Cup Finals..EVER!
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 02:27 pm
@Lordyaswas,
That would explain this,

Quote:
The European body, headed by Platini, had asked its members to vote against Blatter and instead back his rival Prince Ali bin al-Hussein, yet 10 associations defied those wishes while three abstained. Prince Ali received a total 73 votes – 40 from Uefa – compared to Blatter’s 113 last week, and those who rebelled included France, Spain and Russia.


http://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/jun/01/sepp-blatter-fifa-reelection-uefa-divisions
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 02:38 pm
@izzythepush,
I also think that the Qatari Air Force deal that our Canadian bloke (Black eyes) posted about recently under the username of his "French" alias, Olly boy.

Just do a google search for "dassault Qatar" , and you will see another reason why France would want Blatter to remain, in order to not rock the boat with the Qatar World Cup.

Another thing........ Platini's son happens to be the Head of a Sports Equipment Company, owned by a massive Qatari Trust Fund.


Les Grenouilles don't really come out of this exactly squeaky clean, do they.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 02:42 pm
@Lordyaswas,
No they don't, can't say I'm that surprised.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 02:46 pm
@izzythepush,
Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose .
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 02:57 pm
It looks like Blazer hasn't had time to take down his blog yet.

It makes sort of sick reading now.

http://chuckblazer.blogspot.co.uk
Lordyaswas
 
  0  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 11:12 pm
@Lordyaswas,
My my, overnight (uk overnight), all the "French" related posts immediately above this one have been voted down to zero!

It's as if an angry Frenchman has stumbled upon it, and gone and told his friend from Quebec. Very Happy
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 12:31 am
@Lordyaswas,

Septic Blatter is going to hang about at FIFA till when?

How many documents could he shred by then? I hope the Swiss "authorities" have secured some evidence. Even about France... or the FA.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 12:36 am
@McTag,
Exactly my thoughts back here:



http://able2know.org/topic/279244-3#post-5965333
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 03:16 am
@Lordyaswas,

It's a tradition on A2K, earlier posts can be routinely ignored and often are, even when they're more informative, timely, or amusing.
But obviously, anyone who agrees with me is on the right lines.

Jon Stewart enjoys sending it all up:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2KmwpYZfRY
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 05:40 am
Don 't pay any attention to the "thumbing-down" of posts, your Lordyship. There is one joker, or perhaps more than one, who comes through roughly late at night on the eastern seabaoard of North America, which is very early morning in western Europe, or late afternoon in Australia--and votes down every recent post in every thread, until they get tired of it and go away. It has absolutely nothing to do with content, and very likely also does not refer to the member being voted down either. It's just an idiot child's game.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 06:27 am
The latest. I'm not at all surprised to hear this, there's been talk that Warner felt he was being hung out to dry by Blatter.

Quote:
Former Fifa vice president Jack Warner has said in a TV address that he will reveal all he knows about corruption at the world football body.

Mr Warner, who said he feared for his life, also said he could link Fifa officials to general elections in his native Trinidad and Tobago in 2010.

He is one of the 14 people charged by the US over corruption at Fifa.

Another top Fifa official and key witness, Chuck Blazer, has admitted accepting bribes.

The admissions came in a newly released transcript of Mr Blazer's guilty plea from 2013, as part of a wide-ranging US criminal case that has engulfed Fifa and led President Sepp Blatter to resign.

The US justice department alleges the 14 people charged worldwide accepted bribes and kickbacks estimated at more than $150m (£97m) over a 24-year period. Four others had already been charged, including Mr Blazer.

Mr Warner, 72, resigned from all football activity in 2011 amid bribery allegations and later stepped down as Trinidad and Tobago's security minister amid a fraud inquiry.
Mr Warner, a key figure in the deepening scandal, said he had given lawyers documents outlining the links between Fifa, its funding, himself and the 2010 election in Trinidad and Tobago. He said the transactions also included Fifa chief Sepp Blatter.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-33002674

There's also talk of releasing Michael Garcia's report into Fifa corruption which is probably far more explosive than Chuck Blazer's revelations.
0 Replies
 
 

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