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Gramma

 
 
Reply Fri 8 May, 2015 09:07 am
'Neither one of the two students failed the examination?'Does this sentence right?
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 567 • Replies: 5
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InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 May, 2015 12:35 pm
@paster123,
This sentence is right.
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Tes yeux noirs
 
  2  
Reply Fri 8 May, 2015 12:59 pm
@paster123,
The sentence is right; you can omit "one" and "two" without affecting the meaning.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 May, 2015 01:28 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
Correct. The sentence
"Neither of the students failed the examination."
Implies only two students.
For more than one, it would read.
"None of the students failed the examination"
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Tes yeux noirs
 
  2  
Reply Fri 8 May, 2015 02:10 pm
'Neither one of the ...', although not incorrect, would be seen as cumbersome by many native speakers, and in fact "neither student failed the examination" would be acceptable.
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Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 May, 2015 01:32 am
In fact, there would usually have to be a good reason for not saying "both students passed the examination"
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