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I need help with analysing a sentence

 
 
Nat093
 
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 12:10 pm
Hi. Can you tell me if my analysis of this sentence is good?

I am from England.

I = Subject
am = Verb
from England = Object / Prepositional Phrase?

I'm not sure if the verb "be" here is a linking or action verb?
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 594 • Replies: 8
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Herald
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 01:58 pm
@Nat093,
Nat093 wrote:
I am from England.
     ... and I am not exactly from the Buckingham Palace, but IMV 'to be' is predicate in that sentence. Pronoun, verb and proper noun are part of the speech, and subject, predicate and object are components of the syntax.
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PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 02:22 pm
'from England" is an adverbial propositional phrase.

layman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 02:42 pm
@PUNKEY,
Quote:
adverbial propositional phrase.


Heh, whatever that is.
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layman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 02:44 pm
@Nat093,
Quote:
I'm not sure if the verb "be" here is a linking or action verb?


Good question. Take the sentence "I am" (as in, I exist). Is "am" a "verb" there? Sounds like more of a status than an "action."
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Herald
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 09:57 pm
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:
'from England" is an adverbial propositional phrase
     As component of the syntax (part of the sentence) perhaps it is called 'adjunct'. The object here is missed. The actual sentence is: I am a person from England. ... but in that case 'from England' becomes attribute of the object 'person'.
     Natural language parsing and natural language understanding is not a joke, notwithstanding that a lot of machines are doing that nowadays without any problems.
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PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 01:57 pm
Adverbs answer when, where, how much and when.

The prepositional phrase "from England" is no different in function than "in the house."

Herald
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 10:53 pm
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:
Adverbs answer when, where, how much and when.
     Everything depends on the way you have learned the analysis of the syntax.
     If you have learned the syntax subject/predicate, 'I' is the subject and 'am from England' is compound predicate, but I haven't learned the syntax in that way, so I cannot tell you whether the compound predicate is analysed further as syntax as well, or as a syntax structure comprising parts of the speech. Perhaps you should ask somebody who is better acquainted with the new grammar performances.
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Mar, 2015 10:22 am
@Herald,
Well, I have learned something today.

Apparently there is such a thing as a "non movement" verb. The sentence verb would be "am from"

From a web search:
"From is also used with certain "non-movement verbs"
in two very common phrases--be from and come
from. These two phrases are generally used to show
someone's origin. If be from or come from are
followed by a country, it is understood to be someone's
native country / country of citizenship. If be from or
come from are followed by a city, it is understood to
be someone's home town.

Nadia is from / comes from Tunisia.
(Nadia is a native of / a citizen of Tunisia.)

Ricardo is from / comes from
Recife, Brazil. (Ricardo is a native of /
a citizen of Brazil; his home town is Recife.)

Where is Przemyslaw from?
(What is Przemyslaw's native country /
country of citizenship?)

Where does Przemyslaw come from?
(What is Przemyslaw's native country /
country of citizenship?)

When native speakers of English use be from or
come from to refer to someone who was born in their
own country, the place after be from or come from
is normally someone's home city, state, province, etc.:

Mr. Ferguson is from / comes from
Chicago. (Mr. Ferguson's home town
is Chicago.)

I'm from / I come from Illinois, but
I live in Arizona now. (Illinois is my
home state, but I live in Arizona now.)

Jean-Luc is from / comes from
Quebec. (Jean-Luc's home province
is Quebec.)

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