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British and their tea...

 
 
Anoxia
 
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 06:14 am
Edit: Moderator: Moved from General to Food & Drink

I drink a lot of tea, and I watch a lot of BBCAmerica... and I have a silly question...

What kind of tea do the British drink?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 4,402 • Replies: 21
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 06:33 am
Jean-Luc Picard, supposedly French, but clearly British in accent, always drinks Earl Grey, hot. I would suppose that Indian teas are also popular, like Darjeeling, and maybe Orange Pekoe as well. Reminds them of Colonial days. There is English Breakfast tea, but whether or not it's really British, I don't know. I also highly doubt, despite the advertising, that Brits actually pity the fact that Red Rose tea is only availible in Canada.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 06:36 am
Quote:
What king of tea do the British drink?


Is that a trivia question?

King of Tea..... hmmmmm, ok, ok, I'm thinking.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 06:38 am
I was being polite in avoiding that one gustav, but I must say, I was tempted. Then I thought on poor Foo Foo's disappearence and figured I'd leave it alone.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 06:41 am
It Montana stumbles across this thread and finds you making light of the Foo Foo situation, you're going to have hell to pay.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 06:57 am
I would never make light of the Foo Foo situation. I love rabbits. Most of them anyway. Dwarf rabbits are my favourites actually.
http://www.canaille.org/us/gallery.php
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 06:59 am
Not that rabbits have anything to do with tea, unless you are a Lewis Carroll fan.
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NickFun
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 07:12 am
I am partial to Scandanavian Beaver Tea, made from the liver of Scandanvian Beavers. It's very expensive - oh, hell, I'm just making this up. Try Lipton.
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 07:19 am
most of our tea is from India and Ceylon - supermarket own brand best, nothing special

Personally, I really hate the scented taste of Earl Grey tea and it is a specialist tea, not commonly used.

I like herbal teas like Mango, Orange and Cinnamon
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Anoxia
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 12:00 pm
Thank you, Vivien!
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2004 12:07 pm
Vivien is probably reacting to the bergamot that is used to scent Earl Grey tea. Just a wee factoid: oil of bergamot, availible in health shops, is a really good treatment for topical skin diseases, and some other ailments:

"Bergamot oil has a strong affinity for the urinary tract and is valuable in the treatment of cystitis and urethritis. It should be used in the bath or as a local wash at a 1% dilution.

In helping with mental and psychological states Bergamot is most valuable for its uplifting effects. For tension anxiety or depression bergamot should be used in a massage oil or in a dally bath.

The fragrance blends well with lavender, neroli, jasmine, geranium, chamomile, lemon, cypress and juniper. bergamot can be used in the treatment of tensions causing dietary problems such as over and under eating.

The antiseptic qualities of Bergamot make it ideal for the treatment of skin complaints such as acne, oily skin and all infections of the skin.

Bergamot is cooling in feverish conditions and has effective insect repellent properties.

Bergamot has an inhibiting effect on certain viruses in particular Herpes simplex 1 which causes cold sores. Bergamot will also allay the pain of shingles and ease chicken pox in small children. "
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kitchenpete
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 07:09 am
Tea is definitely the Brits' favourite drink.

The best known brand it Twinings, who offer a whole range of teas: http://www.twinings.com/en_gb/tea_finder/tea_finder.asp

Currently in my cupboard at home, I have Twinings' Ceylon, Earl Grey and Traditional Afternoon. I also enjoy Lapsang Souchong, which has a smoky flavour.

More commonly drunk are blended teas, such as Tetley, PG Tips or Typhoo. Supermarket brands are often similar - mainly Indian tea (high percentage of Assam) or similar, which makes a darkish brew - suitable for the Brits preferred way of drinking - with a dash of milk and possibly a spoonful of sugar.

Here is what George Orwell had to say about it:

http://www.246.dk/teaorwell.html

I think that gives a reasonable impression. KP
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Grand Duke
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 07:32 am
kitchenpete wrote:
Tea is definitely the Brits' favourite drink... the Brits preferred way of drinking - with a dash of milk and possibly a spoonful of sugar.


I'm with KP on this one. Tea is quite possibly the best drink in the world. Coffee is okay (I love a double expresso), but it's not refreshing and leaves a strong aftertaste, which tea doesn't.

I don't really have a prefered brand. I mostly buy the major blended brands such as KP has mentioned. I am quite taken with the PG Tips pyramid tea-bags, as they make a faster cup.

For the record, I take my tea strong (bag in cup for at least 2 mins) with a splash of (half-fat) milk and a level teaspoon of (white) sugar.

Many tea-drinkers claim that the tea tastes better when made in a teapot, rather than the cup, but I mainly make it for 1, so a full pot is a waste. My gran drinks about 12-15 cups per day. I drink about 8 cups.
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Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 07:39 am
cavfancier wrote:
I also highly doubt, despite the advertising, that Brits actually pity the fact that Red Rose tea is only availible in Canada.


Red Rose is available in New England. It is the only tea my mother will drink. But then her parents were Canadian.
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 07:40 am
Doesn't tea have a higher content of caffeine, than coffee?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 07:54 am
cavfancier wrote:
I also highly doubt, despite the advertising, that Brits actually pity the fact that Red Rose tea is only availible in Canada.


Red Rose is/was an English company :wink:

Quote:
Initially, Red Rose was sold mainly in the Atlantic Provinces of Canada, but soon distribution expanded into other parts of Canada and into the United States beginning in the 1920's. Distribution initially was in cities near the Canadian border such as Portland, Buffalo, and Detroit. In 1929, Red Rose introduced tea bags for the first time.

The business continued to expand and in 1932 a new chapter in the history of Red Rose began. Mr. Estabrooks sold Red Rose to Brooke Bond & Company of England. Arthur Brooke had founded Brooke Bond and Company in 1869, starting with a single tea shop. There was no Mr. Bond, but Arthur Brooke thought it sounded better and what was to become one of the world's leading tea companies was born. During the 1890's, Arthur Brooke expanded beyond tea shops and into the wholesale tea market using vans to deliver his tea all over England. The Brooke Bond name became synonymous with tea throughout the United Kingdom and his company introduced a second brand - PG Tips in 1930. Brooke Bond also became a major brand in the large tea market of India. With the sale to Brooke Bond, Red Rose was part of a global tea company and flourished under the guidance of the parent company and Arthur Brooke's son Gerald, who became chairman in 1910.

Following the Second World War, Brooke Bond established their Canadian business in Montreal Quebec and continued to grow the Red Rose tea brand. By the 1970's, Red Rose was sold in much of the United States and Canada.

In 1985, Unilever NV acquired Brooke Bond Foods, Inc. Shortly thereafter, Unilever sold the rights to the Red Rose brand in the United States to Redco Foods, Inc. retaining the rights in Canada and other parts of the world. Production of Red Rose tea for the United States market moved to Little Falls, New York in 1988.
Source
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margo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 01:09 pm
Miller wrote:
Doesn't tea have a higher content of caffeine, than coffee?


I don't think so, Miller - but I have no facts to back me up.

I seldom drink coffee, and when I do, it gives me such a jolt! The same goes for those caffeinated cola drinks. I only drink them when I have to make a long driving trip over a road I've travelled many a time (have to do this trip again next weekend Confused )

I drink tea fairly regularly - I prefer a Ceylon blend. I didn't think the caffeine in it affected me. However, I replaced my second (large) cup of tea in the morning with some fresh fruit and vegetable juice, when I received a juicer as a gift. While I absolutely love the juice, I did notice that I was harder to get going in the morning, and now have a cuppa as soon as I get to work. No tea - no action Sad

I should add that I'm not British, in case anyone was confused Razz
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 02:09 pm
Vivien wrote:
I like herbal teas like Mango, Orange and Cinnamon


These are properly called tisanes, not tea. (one of my big bugbeary points - done my rant)
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NickFun
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 02:44 pm
I don't recommend too much tea or coffee for those long boring road trips where there are no rest rooms along the way. Especially for the ladies.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2004 03:03 pm
Thanks for the info, Walter. I'm not a tea drinker myself, the tannins wreak havoc on my system, but I did always wonder about those Red Rose ads I saw as a kid.
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