10
   

Can someone please help me with this sentence?

 
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 12:27 pm
@argome321,
What? I don't understand what you're saying.
argome321
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 12:36 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
What? I don't understand what you're saying.


No, I don't mind you speaking bluntly, as a reply to what you said in the prior post. Generally when people are blunt it is usually to express something negative or something they find disagreeable while trying be respectful or so. So if you found something about my post that bothers you let me know, how else can I correct it, we only know what we don't know.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 12:40 pm
@argome321,
If you reread what I stated is that your grasp of the English language is peculiar. Out of curiosity, is English your first language? I mean no offense but you have not demonstrated enough of a grasp of the English language where you should be offering others advice about English grammar or word usage.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 12:40 pm
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:
Are you saying that changing the spelling masks out the grammar correction condition?

Yes, that is what I am saying.

Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 12:42 pm
@contrex,
Now that is interesting. I wonder if that is some sort of an oddity of the program...or just one of the Swiss cheese holes in the program?
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 12:55 pm
I use the Word "corrections" as suggestions...and often over-ride the suggestions.At times, it calls attention to actual errors...or offers alternatives that I like...so I am happy it is available.
0 Replies
 
argome321
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 01:05 pm
@Ragman,
Ragman

Thanks for you explanation I appreciate that, but I will disagree with your assessment.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 01:10 pm
@argome321,
You never answered my question. Is English your first language?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 01:40 pm
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:
Now that is interesting. I wonder if that is some sort of an oddity of the program...or just one of the Swiss cheese holes in the program?

It's odd. I found a list of 61 verbs that can end in -ized or -ised. I tried them out in MS Word. The error that the OP got with "authorized" occurred where [x] follows the verb in this list (there are probably others). At first glance I can't see any common factor.

agonized
alphabetized
analyzed
apologized
authorized [x]
bastardized
capitalized
carbonized
categorized
characterized
colonized
colorized
computerized
demonized
dramatized
equalized
fossilized
globalized
homogenized
hospitalized
hypnotized [x]
immunized
imperialized
institutionalized
materialized [x]
maximized
mechanized
mesmerized
minimized
normalized
optimized
organized
pasteurized
patronized
personalized
philosophized
polarized
popularized
pressurized
prioritized
privatized [x]
publicized
recognized
revolutionized [x]
secularized
specialized
standardized
sterilized
summarized [x]
symbolized
synchronized
synthesized
tenderized
terrorized
theorized
vandalized
visualized
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 01:44 pm
If you change all the -ized endings to -ised, the green underlined grammar "errors" go away but there is one red underlined spelling "error" found: "colorised", which it suggests should be "colorized" or "colourised" or "colonized".
argome321
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 01:53 pm
@Ragman,
Thanks for you explanation I appreciate that, but I will disagree with your assessment.

Well, is the above grammatically correct? Is the above peculiar?
Yes, English is my first language. I'm more interested in ideas then how to present them. I could grammatically craft the most perfect English paper ever written and it still could be is misconstrued. Once it is constructed in goes into the void and doesn't matter...at least to me.

But I think most people get the meaning of what I am saying. I think you understood what I was saying even though you wrote " what, I don't know what you mean" when I first replied to your inquiry and responded with you wanted say something in the negative.
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 01:58 pm
@contrex,
A couple more things -

I was rather inaccurate in saying that "authorised" is the proper way to spell that word in British English. I have since found for verbs both endings are possible, in US and British English the -ise and -ize spellings are both "correct", but in British usage the ratio is about 60% -ise and 40% -ize. That is, the -ize spelling is often incorrectly seen as an Americanism in Britain. I don't have any comparable figures for the ratio of -ize to -ise in US spelling.

Also, I will observe that computer analysis of natural language is still in its infancy, and many scholars are scornful of grammar checkers. I read an interesting Ecnomist article by a professional author about Grammarly, a MS Word add-on, which costs $140 per year in its full version. His verdict: "Computer analysis of natural language is very tough stuff, and Grammarly has utterly flailed in the tests here. The best way to learn to write is from other humans, and $140 will buy a lot of well-written and edited books. Caveat scriptor."

Link:

http://www.economist.com/blogs/johnson/2012/08/grammar-software




Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 02:05 pm
@argome321,
The nature of the Op and the issue here is a discussion about grammar so if you're posting this... :
Quote:
I'm more interested in ideas then how to present them.


In this case, you are doing the OP a disservice.

As I stated earlier in this reply and in some of your compositions in other threads, it seems to me as though your grasp of English was peculair...as though English was not your first language. That is not a horrible circumstance...no matter what the cause.

However, when you offer grammar help, you might not be as expert as you may think. Just saying.

As the vulture whispered as he flew overhead, "carry on!"
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 02:42 pm
@argome321,
Because you asked about your grammar, I will respond. I don't mean to be hypercritical. After all, this post is about using correct grammar.

Quote:
Thanks for you explanation I appreciate that, but I will disagree with your assessment.

Well, is the above grammatically correct? Is the above peculiar?


No, frankly, it isn't. "Thanks for you explanation. I appreciate that, but I will disagree with your assessment."
I corrected what you wrote by making 2 sentences.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 02:47 pm
@contrex,
Many thanks for your input and that link.

FWIW, I recall seeing it here in USA as most often spelled as 'authorize' with a z.

I just researched it and found the following article that provides even more background on the different spellings of words like authorize/authorise and other words with suffixes -ize and - ise :
http://grammarist.com/spelling/authorise-authorize/

0 Replies
 
argome321
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 03:09 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
No, frankly, it isn't. "Thanks for you explanation. I appreciate that, but I will disagree with your assessment."
I corrected what you wrote by making 2 sentences.


the missing period was a typo
0 Replies
 
knaivete
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 10:33 pm
Quote:
authorize (v.) ..."give formal approval to," late 14c., autorisen, from Old French autoriser "authorize, give authority to" (12c.), from Medieval Latin auctorizare, from auctor (see author (n.)). Modern spelling from 16c. Related: Authorized; authorizing


http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=authorize


If a simpler sentence than the original was used, then perhaps we'd have nothing to discuss.

Quote:
Access to the regulated area was limited to authorized personnel only.


Access was limited to authorised personnel.
0 Replies
 
jcb31
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Feb, 2015 02:21 pm
@sleeepy2,
its fine, sometime spelling/grammar check can be a bit dodgy
0 Replies
 
 

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