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Is this an argument if so what are the conclusion and premise?

 
 
Reply Fri 6 Feb, 2015 03:03 am
“Is the author really entitled to assert that there is a degree of unity among these essays which makes this a book rather than a congeries? I am inclined to say that he is justified in this claim, but articulating this justification is a somewhat complex task.”
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Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 2,200 • Replies: 5
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carloslebaron
 
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Reply Fri 6 Feb, 2015 10:49 am
@melogelo,
Before giving an opinion, what is the topic of the essays and/or book?
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Frank Apisa
 
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Reply Fri 6 Feb, 2015 11:14 am
@melogelo,
melogelo wrote:

“Is the author really entitled to assert that there is a degree of unity among these essays which makes this a book rather than a congeries? I am inclined to say that he is justified in this claim, but articulating this justification is a somewhat complex task.”


Not going to answer your specific question, but will offer this observation.

The guy could have a valid point about the degree of unity...no matter what.

Damn near anything can be shown to be related to almost anything else. Six degrees of separation works with things other than humans.

Pick two things...and construct a diagram that links them in some way. The add a third...and see if you can find a link common to both. Then a third thing...and so on.

Hell...that could become an A2K game.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Feb, 2015 06:32 pm
@Frank Apisa,
You and I are Joiseyites, for example.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Feb, 2015 08:37 pm
@melogelo,
melogelo wrote:

“Is the author really entitled to assert that there is a degree of unity among these essays which makes this a book rather than a congeries?


Sometimes questions can be used rhetorically to make positive assertions, but this doesn't seem to be the case here. This doesn't seem to be either a disguised premise or conclusion.

Quote:
I am inclined to say that he is justified in this claim, but articulating this justification is a somewhat complex task.”


The positive assertions here are:
1) I am inclined...
2) he is justified...
3) articulating this is complex.

2) is the conclusion that might subsequently be supported by premises, but there are no premises given. The implication is that articulating them would be too complex, so the author doesn't do it. I don't see an argument.
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Razzleg
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Feb, 2015 12:09 am
@melogelo,
melogelo wrote:

“Is the author really entitled to assert that there is a degree of unity among these essays which makes this a book rather than a congeries? I am inclined to say that he is justified in this claim, but articulating this justification is a somewhat complex task.”


The statement you provide does not constitute an argument. It implies that there is an argument, and i suspect, given the provisionary form of the statement, would introduce a multi-part or -stage argument, but it is not, itself, an argument.

Good luck on your homework.
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