5
   

Does Newton's first law apply to the present environment?

 
 
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2015 03:56 pm
Newton's first law of motion is...

An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.

Three hundred years ago when Newton created it, there were only horse drawn carts, no lights, no mechanism, no cars, no airplanes, no trains, so what could he relate his first law of motion with?

Could the motion be the moon, and the object of rest be the earth? .
 
contrex
 
  6  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2015 04:53 pm
Are you serious? Are you aged about 9?
Rickoshay75
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2015 05:38 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

Are you serious? Are you aged about 9?



Your lack of intelligence, respect, and an open mind is the problem here, not my post, but you at least kept the debate alive and I'm grateful for that. . .
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2015 07:45 pm
What contrex said. The question makes absolutely no sense.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 03:36 am
@Lustig Andrei,
think "inertia, force, and momentum". Those concepts are timeless.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 06:49 am
It's quite fundamental that this is always true.
0 Replies
 
timur
 
  3  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 07:13 am
I think of myself as an object.

I sometimes take a train and use the trip time to take a rest.

Then I'm at rest while in motion.

Does it contradict Newton's first law?
maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 07:38 am
@timur,
Quote:
I think of myself as an object.

I sometimes take a train and use the trip time to take a rest.

Then I'm at rest while in motion.

Does it contradict Newton's first law?


The term you need to know to answer this question is "Frame of Reference". In high school Physics you should have learned to pick a Frame of Reference for a problem and stick with it.

(The answer to your question is 'No', it doesn't contradict Newton's first law.)

timur
 
  3  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 07:43 am
@maxdancona,
It seems that you are not that well-versed in punnery..
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 08:19 am
@Rickoshay75,
Rickoshay75 wrote:

Newton's first law of motion is...

The law was ruled unconstitutional by the Chief Robert's Supreme Court last year. Something to do with the commerce clause in the 10th Amendment. The media ignored the not-so-exciting court ruling (especially Fox News) as they were overly fetishizing the Bengazi scandal still.

Regardless, the ruling was 5 to 4 on the usual party lines.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  3  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 08:22 am
@timur,
I think max just missed the train of your thoughts.
timur
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 08:29 am
@parados,
Ah! I think you are on the right track..
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 10:27 am
I do wish you guys would stop trying to derail this thread.
0 Replies
 
Quehoniaomath
 
  0  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 10:48 am
@Rickoshay75,
Good question! Keep your open mind!

Most of what we are taught as Newton's law is a bunch of rubbish!

Just like black holes (they don't exist!), evolution religion oeps sorry , relativity (bunch of junk!!), quantum physics, ridiculous and stupid and wrong and so on and so forth!

Contrary what some people here do, keep your mind open and QUESTION ANYTHING!!!

You will be in for a surprise!
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 12:29 pm
@Quehoniaomath,
You should keep an open min and be a skeptic about most anything, even when you understand it, look for the potential errors.

However, do not, like our friend Quahog, leave your mind so open that your brains spill out.
0 Replies
 
 

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