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The Science Thread

 
 
FBM
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 11:14 pm
Uranium in a cloud chamber:



Edit: This was also way cool:

layman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 11:20 pm
@FBM,
I'm sure that's a very interesting video, FBM, but I aint gunna sit through 51 minutes of French explanations of what I'm seeing. I don't talk Frog.
FBM
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 11:23 pm
@layman,
Laughing The first couple of minutes is all I watched. Not a lot of drama there. The Brian Cox one explains what's going on.
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 11:27 pm
@FBM,
Quote:
The Brian Cox one explains what's going on.


Well, yes and no, I would say. I see some bubbles in a fish tank, and he says its a proton from perhaps a distant galaxy. To me, that doesn't "explain," it just proclaims. What reason does he have to think it "probably a proton?"

He doesn't give a word of "explanation" for that conclusion, that I could detect, anyway.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 11:35 pm
@layman,
It's a program aimed at the general public. It's appropriate content for that audience. You can google up all the details you need about the physics that's going on in a cloud chamber. I, for one, don't have the time or resources to get a Ph.D in every topic I'm interested in.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 12:27 am
@Kolyo,
It seems that video presentations are the preferred form of information exchange in this thread, so this may not count. But, following up on the Bonnie Bassler video a little bit...

I thought some of these comments, from James Shapiro, a molecular biologist at the University of Chicago were kinda interesting. They come from a paper he published entitled "Bacteria are small but not stupid: Cognition, natural genetic engineering, and sociobacteriology." They also relate to your reference to bacteria as "automata," Kolyo:

Quote:
40 years experience as a bacterial geneticist have taught me that bacteria possess many cognitive, computational and evolutionary capabilities unimaginable in the first six decades of the 20th Century...

The conventional wisdom is an extension of the mechanistic views that came to dominate biological thought in the early years of the 20th Century. The idea is that microbes, particularly prokaryotes, exemplify the basic properties of living cells reduced to their simplest configurations ... .Molecular biology came into being on the promise of confirming mechanistic views of life by defining how living cells worked at a physico-chemical level...

My own view is that we are witnessing a major paradigm shift in the life sciences in the sense that Kuhn (1962) described that process. Matter, the focus of classical molecular biology, is giving way to information as the essential feature used to understand how living systems work. Informatics rather than mechanics is now the key to explaining cell biology and cell activities. Bacteria are full participants in this paradigm shift...


http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/search?q=bacteria+are+small&submit=Search&sort=rlv&t=doc
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 01:00 am
@layman,
Quote:
It seems that video presentations are the preferred form of information exchange in this thread, so this may not count.


Just for the hell of it, I checked youtube for "James Shapiro." There are several 1-2 hour clips there. Here's a relatively short one (15 minutes), if anyone is interested:

0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  0  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 02:14 am
@layman,
layman wrote:
It seems that video presentations are the preferred form of information exchange in this thread . . .
I hope that may never be true.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 03:27 am
@layman,
Oh man, you'll be waiting forever for the nickel to drop. Go to the beginning of the thread and read the posts, one at a time. People are posting videos because the topic of the thread is cool things about science that are quickly and dramatically visual. You can see the scientific principles being displayed before your eyes. Nobody wants to see your one or two hour video. No one, for that matter, wants to see your 15 minute video.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 03:32 am
@Wilso,
Wilso wrote:
Interesting, funny, or amazing science information. I'll start. These guys don't go deep, but make it interesting.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckSoDW2-wrc[/youtube]


This is the OP, the opening post. It's just a thread for having fun with science. Nobody wants it to turn into a lecture hall.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 03:40 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
No one, for that matter, wants to see your 15 minute video.


I imagine it's gratifying to be able to speak for everyone, Set, but just make that everyone minus one, OK? Include me out.

Kolyo just posted an 18 minute video which I found quite interesting.

"Interesting" was one of the criteria specified, as I recall. I also found his video to be somewhat "amazing," but I'm sure a super-sophisticate like yourself would find it mundane and boring. Each to his own, eh?
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Sat 21 Mar, 2015 09:23 am
Took the telescope and camera out tonight. Not sure this qualifies as science, really. Just planetary photography, actually, but here it is.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb192/DinahFyre/56e90e99-9d0e-4e14-aed7-a3d310c7d653.jpg
Wilso
 
  0  
Reply Sat 21 Mar, 2015 06:35 pm
@FBM,
That's excellent.
FBM
 
  0  
Reply Sun 22 Mar, 2015 05:57 am
@Wilso,
Danke. It's about as good as I'm going to get with a 90mm scope and a 2x teleconverter. And that image required a buttload of Photoshop trickery.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  0  
Reply Sun 22 Mar, 2015 06:58 am
By the way, if you really zoom in you might be able to see the faint shadow of Io in the upper right quadrant.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  0  
Reply Wed 8 Apr, 2015 08:25 pm
http://gizmodo.com/tevatron-reveals-higgs-boson-properties-4-years-after-s-1696435536

Quote:
Tevatron Reveals Higgs Boson Properties—4 Years After Shutting Down

The Tevatron collider—the world’s second most powerful particle accelerator—was shut down in 2011. Now, from beyond the grave, it’s revealing properties of the Higgs boson.

The American accelerator, situated at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, ran from 1983 until 2011. During that time, it showed teasing glimpses of the Higgs, but ultimately it was the Large Hadron Collider that finally found the elusive particle. The discovery primarily identified the particle’s mass as 125 giga-electron volts—about 133 times the mass of the proton.

But like any particle, the Higgs boson has other properties, too, such as quantized amount of angular momentum (referred to by physicists as spin) and a kind of symmetry known as parity (which can be either even or odd), which dictate how it decays into different particles. The Standard Model predicts that the Higgs should have zero spin and positive parity—but experimental results were required to confirm that’s the case.

Results from the LHC already suggest that to be the case, but analysis of data from Tevatron soon to be published in Physical Review Letters helps confirm the spin-parity of the Higgs. Science explains how researchers from Fermilab went about it:

Instead of studying the decays of the Higgses, they looked for signs of a Higgs produced in tandem with a Z boson or a W boson, particles that convey the weak nuclear force.... (The Higgs was assumed to decay into a pair of particles known as a bottom quark and an antibottom quark.) From the energies and momenta of the Higgs and its partner, researchers then calculated a quantity called the invariant mass for the pair. Were the Higgs and the partner born from the decay of a single parent particle, this quantity would be the mass of that parent. In actuality, the Higgs and its partner would emerge directly from the chaos of the particle collision, so the parent particle is purely hypothetical.

Nevertheless, by calculating the mass of that hypothetical parent particle, researchers were able to test for different combinations of spin and parity by proxy. If the Higgs had “exotic” spin-parity rather than the standard model characteristics, the observed invariant mass would be higher. So researchers working with the two particle detectors fed by the Tevatron—CDF and D0—searched for such high-invariant mass pairs. Finding none, they ruled out even more stringently exotic versions of the Higgs. So even though Tevatron physicists never conclusively observed the Higgs boson, they were able to put limits on its properties.

The new results from Tevatron confirm with more certainty than those from the LHC that the Higgs has zero spin and positive parity—though, arguably, the LHC did get there first. That’s understandable, though, as many people working on Tevatron shifted to the LHC to perform new experimental work rather than analysing old data.

Regardless of firsts, it’s probably the last exciting glimpse of the Higgs that Tevatron will see. With the baton now firmly passed on to the LHC, our further understanding of the Higgs will come from Europe, not the U.S.. [arXiv via Science]
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Wed 8 Apr, 2015 08:33 pm
anything from these guys makes me crazy happy

(I posted this link in a thread I tried to get going but ... fail ... so you get to enjoy it Wink )

FBM
 
  0  
Reply Wed 8 Apr, 2015 09:11 pm
@ehBeth,
Now, that was weird... Confused
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Apr, 2015 09:29 pm
@FBM,
Science IS weird.

That's why I like it.

FBM
 
  0  
Reply Wed 8 Apr, 2015 09:31 pm
@ehBeth,
Parts of it sure are, and those are the most fascinating parts...
0 Replies
 
 

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