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What's smarter, the brain or the cell that made it?

 
 
Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 08:32 pm
DNA can be described as a single living creature that created this atmosphere we live in. I would like to hear different points of views on how it evolved and how each living thing is dependent on each other to complete this creature.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 3,851 • Replies: 74
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DNA Thumbs drive
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 09:18 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
True DNA as it exist in the untold trillions of one celled algae that produce the O2 that we breath, did have a hand in producing our current atmosphere. Very astute. I think that DNA as we know it was created after a competent understanding of space time, allowed it's creator to traverse the vast distances of space, and locate our little lifeless speck in the universe. So we are back to the zero effect, that when we understand such, we can get back to where we started from, not the Maxine Nightingale song either. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op0upKxdvLs
peter jeffrey cobb
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 09:54 pm
@DNA Thumbs drive,
It's a common misunderstanding, space time is a formula. Not a structure. Is creator clearly expressed that.
But this topic is about DNA, how it evolved into so many species, all dependent on each other to keep this DNA creature alive.
FBM
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 10:15 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
Quote:
A Beginners’ Guide to Science

http://iffresearchjournal.org/volume/1/theuring

Quote:
Beginners Guide to Logic

http://www.ilovephilosophy.com/viewtopic.php?t=152732

Quote:
A Beginner's Guide to English Grammar

http://www.glendale.edu/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=14932
peter jeffrey cobb
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 10:40 pm
@FBM,
Hehe I love it.
Now let's begin our friends the virus.
When a person catches a cold, they create an immunity for that virus. So it records information on the DNA.
We all heard that when you change one part of the DNA it affects multiple others.
So is it logical to say that viruses are responsible for a lot of the evolution of other living species?
FBM
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 10:49 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
Quote:
When a person catches a cold, they create an immunity for that virus. So it records information on the DNA.


Nope. That's not right for at least one reason. The person's immune system detects a foreign protein (antigen) on the virus's surface and produces antibodies against only the protein, not DNA. Some viruses don't have DNA, but only RNA, anyway. But that's not what the body makes antibodies against, either way.
DNA Thumbs drive
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 10:49 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
DNA is a self supporting computer animation program of sorts, however understanding it is beyond human comprehension at this point in time.
peter jeffrey cobb
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 11:31 pm
@DNA Thumbs drive,
Great! It makes a perfect topic to research points of views than!
If something is known than everyone has the same point of view.
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peter jeffrey cobb
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 11:36 pm
@FBM,
So the DNA now has record of that protein to attack.
It recorded information. It changed from it's previous version.
peter jeffrey cobb
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 11:39 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
Well the DNA will create new cells having the rna instructions right?
FBM
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 11:40 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
peter jeffrey cobb wrote:

So the DNA now has record of that protein to attack.
It recorded information. It changed from it's previous version.


No, the host's DNA isn't recording anything in the sense of adding new information to its molecule.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibody

Quote:
An antibody (Ab), also known as an immunoglobulin (Ig), is a large Y-shape protein produced by plasma cells that is used by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects such as bacteria and viruses. The antibody recognizes a unique part of the foreign target, called an antigen.[1][2] Each tip of the "Y" of an antibody contains a paratope (a structure analogous to a lock) that is specific for one particular epitope (similarly analogous to a key) on an antigen, allowing these two structures to bind together with precision. Using this binding mechanism, an antibody can tag a microbe or an infected cell for attack by other parts of the immune system, or can neutralize its target directly (for example, by blocking a part of a microbe that is essential for its invasion and survival). The production of antibodies is the main function of the humoral immune system.[3]
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 11:41 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
peter jeffrey cobb wrote:

Well the DNA will create new cells having the rna instructions right?


No. That's not how the immune system works. See the Wiki I posted just above.
FBM
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 11:48 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
Suggested further reading on the basics of immunity: http://www.historyofvaccines.org/content/articles/human-immune-system-and-infectious-disease
0 Replies
 
peter jeffrey cobb
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 11:53 pm
@FBM,
Yes I understand that.
Sorry I didn't mean the short term effects.
The DNA carries information to make new rna from one generation to the next. Like a hard drive and the rna being the soft.
FBM
 
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Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2014 11:55 pm
@peter jeffrey cobb,
peter jeffrey cobb wrote:

Yes I understand that.
Sorry I didn't mean the short term effects.
The DNA carries information to make new rna from one generation to the next. Like a hard drive and the rna being the soft.


Sorry. DNA does not make RNA. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNA
peter jeffrey cobb
 
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Reply Sun 21 Dec, 2014 12:10 am
@FBM,
I know they are different.
Ok let me put it another way.
Does DNA contain the information to make a rna?
Or did rna appear before DNA in evolution?
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Dec, 2014 12:17 am
@peter jeffrey cobb,
From the Wiki link that I provided above:

Quote:
Synthesis of RNA is usually catalyzed by an enzyme—RNA polymerase—using DNA as a template, a process known as transcription.


Quote:
Or did rna appear before DNA in evolution?


In evolution? I'd say neither, since the origins of both are a matter for abiogenesis, not evolution. Very distinct fields.

You might be interested in the RNA world hypothesis, though: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNA_world_hypothesis
peter jeffrey cobb
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Dec, 2014 12:35 am
@FBM,
Ah thank you for correcting my grammar.
It says rna is the origin of dna and is able to pass generic information.
So just replace the word DNA that I been saying with the correct RNA.
Since in site you gave me says it passes information from one generation to another is perfect.
So information is written on your RNA, passed down to the next generation. So you evolve when you encounter a virus right?
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Dec, 2014 12:42 am
@peter jeffrey cobb,
peter jeffrey cobb wrote:

Ah thank you for correcting my grammar.
It says rna is the origin of dna and is able to pass generic information.


No, it says that this is a hypotheis, not a fact. That's an important distinction to remember.

Quote:
So just replace the word DNA that I been saying with the correct RNA.
Since in site you gave me says it passes information from one generation to another is perfect.


The hypothesis is that RNA preceeded DNA; not that RNA makes DNA in living organisms today.

Quote:
So information is written on your RNA, passed down to the next generation.


For humans, it's DNA. Quick question, and please don't take this the wrong way, but approximately what percentage of that Wiki text was comprehensible to you? I teach EFL, so I'm always adjusting reading materials to my students' individual levels.

Quote:
So you evolve when you encounter a virus right?


This is what's called a non sequitur. Your conclusion does not follow from your premises. I explained above and linked you to information that shows why neither DNA nor RNA are altered by an individual's exposure to a virus or bacterium.

More on non sequitur here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non_sequitur_(logic)
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Dec, 2014 12:44 am
@peter jeffrey cobb,
Another quick question, if you don't mind: Are you aware of the differences between evolution and natural selection?
 

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