9
   

Can you name some companies that you genuinely hate?

 
 
Banana Breath
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2014 09:59 pm
@engineer,
Quote:
"Union Carbide went to court, lost, paid out their settlement, sent their executives to jail, etc. If you genuinely hate Dow for their current actions, so be it but I don't see Bhopal as falling in Dow's accounting ledger."


If you know even the first thing about US laws, not to mention Indian laws, reaching a settlement on some aspects of a disaster, such as the personal injury portion, doesn't excuse a company from culpability in other areas including torts, contracts, general civil law, and environmental impact. To refresh your memory on this, try to recall the British company BP's Deepwater Horizon disaster of 2010.
Quote:
In November 2012, BP and the United States Department of Justice settled federal criminal charges with BP pleading guilty to 11 counts of manslaughter, two misdemeanors, and a felony count of lying to Congress. BP also agreed to four years of government monitoring of its safety practices and ethics, and the Environmental Protection Agency announced that BP would be temporarily banned from new contracts with the US government. BP and the Department of Justice agreed to a record-setting $4.525 billion in fines and other payments

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deepwater_Horizon_oil_spill

Just because they went to court and were fined, that does not in any way mean that's the end of it. They are currently in court for entirely different charges under the Clean Water Act and the Natural Resources Damage Assessment. But why don't you hurry over to the courthouse and plead their case that they were already fined, and should be immune from any further prosecution. And while you're at it, advise them to merge with BPCorp of Delaware and tell them how you believe that will also prevent any further responsibility.

Peter Frouman
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 04:03 am
@engineer,
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 07:43 am
@Banana Breath,
Today is the 30th anniversary of the Bhopal disaster.

So you say that Dow is legally liable. Do any courts agree with you? (I'm asking because I don't know and what I can find says that Dow did not merge with UC, it bought all of its stock. That is a significant difference in US and Indian law. Stockholders do not have liability for a corporation's misdeeds.) I have found articles that say Dow must ensure that UC appears in court, but not any that have found that Dow is liable.

From the Dow website
Quote:
Did The Dow Chemical Company (TDCC) inherit any liability for Bhopal when it purchased the shares of Union Carbide (UCC) in 2001?

No. While UCC's stock is owned by TDCC, UCC remains a separate company as a TDCC subsidiary. Under well-established principles of corporate law, both in India and the United States, TDCC did not assume UCC's liabilities as part of the 2001 transaction.

Indeed, according to the formal legal opinions of two respected Indian jurists, Senior Counsel, Dr. Abhishek Manu Singhvi and Mr. Arun Jaitely, TDCC cannot be found liable under the laws of India.

engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 08:02 am
Some of this debate makes me think how subjective "hating" a company is. You might hate Dow Chemical for Bhopal and admire Amazon for changing the way we buy things while I recognize Dow's positive contributions to the world and think Amazon runs slave labor camps. Some people think Apple is a great, innovative company changing the way we see the world and others think they turn their eyes away from the labor conditions where their products are made. Wal Mart - slave master almost (but not quite) as bad as Amazon, or a key driving force in the economy making life a little more affordable for a lot of Americans? Chick Fila - good food, clean restaurants and Christian values or homophobic nutcases? The reality is likely not either/or but both.

Is it reasonable to decide that a company is evil and worthy of hate?
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 09:44 am
This may be of interest.

Quote:
The children of Bhopal bear scars of gas leak.
A poisonous gas leak from the Union Carbide Corporation plant in the central Indian city of Bhopal 30 years ago killed several thousand people and injured more than half a million.

Thirty years later, many still bear the scars - they include children with birth and congenital defects and others whose lives have been blighted by chronic illness.

Nazes Afroz travels to Bhopal to meet children born to parents who were exposed to the gas on 3 December 1984 or who were born in the aftermath of the leak.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-30227852
0 Replies
 
Banana Breath
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 10:10 am
@engineer,
Quote:
this debate makes me think how subjective "hating" a company is

Of course it's subjective, and your answer reveals much about you and your values. There isn't one right and wrong answer, but have the guts to actually answer the question and defend it. And in a public forum such as this, if you're going to throw around "slave labor" charges against a company such as Amazon, you'd damned well better start presenting good references to support your claim or admit you're being metaphorical when you actually mean "they pay minimum wage or better and provide company benefits, and adhere to all OSHA regulations and have had a long history of complying with all regulations." Those are NOT the same.
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 12:57 pm
@Banana Breath,
Quote:
And in a public forum such as this, if you're going to throw around "slave labor" charges against a company such as Amazon, you'd damned well better start presenting good references to support your claim

Link has already been provided, charges in Germany already been filed.
Here are the OSHA violations after an employee death.
Here's an article referencing those violations and a second death.
It took me a moment to find this one about Amazon refusing to provide proper ventilation during a heat wave.
Quote:
In a lengthy and heavily reported article, The Call said a warehouse employee contacted the Occupational Safety and Health Administration on June 2 to report that the heat index in the warehouse had reached 102 degrees, and that 15 workers had collapsed. The employee also said workers who were sent home because of the heat received disciplinary points.

Eight days later, the paper said, an emergency room doctor at a local hospital saw enough Amazon employees suffering from heat-related injuries to call OSHA and report “an unsafe environment.”

Edit: Here is the full length original article.

"But why don't you hurry over to the courthouse and plead their case "
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 01:21 pm
@engineer,
More good quotes from the full report:
Quote:

Many warehouse workers are hired for temporary positions by Integrity Staffing Solutions, or ISS, and are told that if they work hard they may be converted to permanent positions with Amazon, current and former employees said. The temporary assignments end after a designated number of hours, and those not hired to permanent Amazon jobs can reapply for temporary positions again after a few months, workers said.

Temporary employees interviewed said few people in their working groups actually made it to a permanent Amazon position. Instead, they said they were pushed harder and harder to work faster and faster until they were terminated, they quit or they got injured. Those interviewed say turnover at the warehouse is high and many hires don't last more than a few months.


Quote:
Goris, the Allentown resident who worked as a permanent Amazon employee, said high temperatures were handled differently at other warehouses in which he worked. For instance, loading dock doors on opposite sides of those warehouses were left open to let fresh air circulate and reduce the temperature when it got too hot, he said. When Amazon workers asked in meetings why this wasn't done at the Amazon warehouse, managers said the company was worried about theft, Goris said.


Quote:
Not working fast enough, or failing to "make rate," is a common reason employees get disciplinary points, those interviewed said. Workers are expected to maintain a rate, measured in units per hour, which varies depending on the job and the size of inventory being handled. Products moving through the warehouse range broadly in size, from compact discs and iPods to chain saws. Workers use hand-held scanners to track inventory as it moves through the warehouse, which enables managers to monitor productivity minute by minute, employees said.


Quote:
Computers monitored the heat index in the building and Amazon employees received notification about the heat index by email. Goris said one day the heat index, a measure that considers humidity, exceeded 110 degrees on the third floor.

"I remember going up there to check the location of an item," Goris said. "I lasted two minutes, because I could not breathe up there."

Allentown resident Robert Rivas, 38, said he left his permanent Amazon warehouse job after about 13 months to take another job. He said he intensified his job search in May after the warehouse started getting very hot.

"We got emails about the heat, and the heat index got to really outrageous numbers," he said, recalling that the index during one of his shifts hit 114 degrees on the ground floor in the receiving area.

Rivas said he received Amazon email notifications at his work station when employees needed assistance due to heat-related symptoms. He estimated he received between 20 and 30 such emails within a two-hour period one day. Some people pushed themselves to work in the heat because they did not want to get disciplinary points, he said.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  4  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 01:25 pm
Anything Murdoch owns (undermining democracy).
Limagrain, Monsanto and pretty much the entire seed industry (destroying agricultural biodiversity).
Various mafias (especially around Napoli, as not only do they kill and steal but they're also a cancer for the state and managed to pollute the entire countryside for generations).
KFC (the food is just too bad).
Barnes and Nobles and a few other mega retailers of cultural items (their predatory behaviour is impoverishing literature)

engineer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 01:44 pm
@Olivier5,
Olivier5 wrote:

Barnes and Nobles and a few other mega retailers of cultural items (their predatory behaviour is impoverishing literature)

Darn! Thanks for reminding me. Amazon's use of its size to demand lower royalties to authors and its use of its website to retaliate against authors and publishers that don't play ball.
0 Replies
 
Banana Breath
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 03:14 pm
@engineer,
Quote:
Link has already been provided, charges in Germany already been filed.
Here are the OSHA violations after an employee death.


Fail, and fail again. Do you even know what a proper citation is? First, your claim of "charges in Germany" has no citation, and a google search of "Amazon 'slave labor" charges germany" produces no hits.
Second, apparently you didn't even bother to read the link you attached to your own claim of OSHA violations, because of the FIVE companies cited with violations in the article, NONE of them were Amazon. That's right, go back and read it now. One was a third-party logistics provider 'Genco,' based in Pittsburgh, and four were temporary staffing agencies.

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEWS_RELEASES&p_id=26208
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 03:17 pm
@engineer,
Good thing they don't really have a presence here, so I've never used their service.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 03:20 pm
@engineer,
Nope. Not going to the Dow website for the truth about Dow. Doesn't begin to make sense.

The reading I've been doing about this since yesterday has reinforced my feeling about Dow. Their product use is pretty limited in my house already - will look into where their chemical components show up - there may be other products to remove from my home.

Not sure I'd say I hate Dow - but it's definitely not a company I'm going to be supporting.
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 03:21 pm
@engineer,
Amazon is extremely unfair to small sellers.
Restraint of trade comes to mind. But hard to bring them to account from my pipsqueak corner.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 03:28 pm
@neologist,
Tax dodgers. Send the board of directors to prison.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 04:14 pm
Not exactly, but my animosity toward companies is directly proportional to the amount of corruption and exploitation that they throw into the collective. Wealth skimmers that dont add anything to our quality of life also get it from me

Almost all banks
Almost all of the non bank financial system (money traders, hedge funds, payday lenders)
rent to own companies
monsanto
all of the drug companies
Lobbying firms
Wall street lawyers
Nursing home firms
Most if not all of the for profit hospital firms

I dont think I will call it hate just yet, but I have a deep aversion to the personal data collectors/traders. Google, facebook and all the others.
Olivier5
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 04:23 pm
@hawkeye10,
Let's not forget the financial rating companies who send the world into recession by dereliction of their duty vis a vis sub-prime emiters. Bring back the guillotine for Moody's and S&P.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 04:33 pm
@Olivier5,
Olivier5 wrote:

Let's not forget the financial rating companies who send the world into recession by dereliction of their duty vis a vis sub-prime emiters. Bring back the guillotine for Moody's and S&P.


Great point. Obviously I hate them too but forgot to mention them. I think at this point we also need to add both the owners of the stock markets and those who run high frequency trades on them, the entire trading system is now deeply corrupt. And there should be a special place in hell for insurance companies too, they who routinely pay unjust claims because they dont give a damn as they work on a cost plus basis and only care about how much wealth they can skim.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 04:44 pm
@hawkeye10,
In a class all their own are the airlines. I generally believe in markets but that is never an excuse for lowering the quality of our lives. There has to be a stand for civility, a place where you refuse to do less simply because the markets will let you get away with it. 29 inch seat pitches and 8 tacked charges for my flight gets the finger from me. And dont give be a bag a mini pretzels with 4 pretzels in it, it is an insult, and creates trash without accomplishing anything. There is not enough product being bagged to justify the bag.
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2014 04:55 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

In a class all their own are the airlines. I generally believe in markets but that is never an excuse for lowering the quality of our lives. There has to be a stand for civility, a place where you refuse to do less because the markets will let you get away with it. 29 inch seat pitches and 8 tacked charges for my flight gets the finger from me.


Okay, this example makes my earlier point about not hating the players but, rather, the game, better than anything.

Why hate on airlines? They aren't cutting costs in obnoxious ways because markets "let you get away with it." They're doing it because markets are forcing them to. If a particular airline broke ranks it would lose out to the other more obnoxious airlines.

These "evil" corporations are the product of environmental conditions.
 

Related Topics

Is Hatred ever ok? - Question by DefensiveDesigner215
Should hatred exist or not? - Question by Yasir9717
Why non-muslims hate muslims? - Question by Yasir9717
Is hatred better than love? - Question by Yasir9717
Pittsburgh for the rest of us - Discussion by McGentrix
Mercilessly - Question by dalehileman
Deborah Pauly is filled with hate. - Discussion by maxdancona
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 01/24/2022 at 03:02:57