Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2014 07:47 pm
@czok,
czok wrote:
Your pension to do this . . .


Pension? Are you sure that's the word you wanted? Look up the word penchant--you don't do yourself any favors by committing gaffes like that.
0 Replies
 
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2014 10:47 pm
@czok,
Quote:
are we gaining or losing land mass to erosion and the seas? (sic)


By definition, land mass (land above sea level) is lost to erosion.

If you wish to access information about volume estimates consult the reference texts noted in articles similar to the one below.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Soil_Loss_Equation
Joebro13243
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Dec, 2014 11:45 pm
@InkRune,
Defiantly loosing
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Dec, 2014 08:56 am
There are places on the planet (areas that were originally covered by continental glaciers) where the land masses are still rising due to isostatic rebound. Places like Canada and our own New England are areas where formations, (once under sea level even when the glaciers accounted for sea level decline), are actually still rising out of the sea . Places along the Maine coast show such rebound as well as along the coasts of Labrador etc.
However, when we get to the areas well south of Pleistocene glaciation moraines and G/F deposits, we see the islands and shorelines being slowly inundated. Heres a measure of bouy 193797 (a key sea level marker for shoreline development in the Delaware/Chesapeake systems

  http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs102-98/fig6.gif
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Dec, 2014 01:41 pm
@Miss L Toad,
The material that gets eroded doesn't vanish into thin air. Its sediments somewhere... So the idea that we're bound to lose land mass to erosion is just not logical. Sometimes we GAIN land mass thanks to erosion, eg in delta estuaries, where sedimentation leads to the delta expanding into the sea.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Dec, 2014 04:41 pm
@Olivier5,
The USLE is a design equation us by geotech engineers to control soil losses to downslope water ways and to keep em from ******* up stream courses by building sediment control devices.

We use mostly modeling today because the Soil Loss equation is more like the "Drake Equation" its pretty much a WAG. (I don't think that the geotech schools even teach it anymore-just like they don't teach surveying anymore)

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Dec, 2014 06:16 pm
Please note that the author of this silly thread is positing a time when there will no longer be any "land mass" above sea level. It is a naïve thesis. The author did not originally restrict himself to erosive sediments--he appears to think that all dry land will disappear beneath the waves.
0 Replies
 
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Dec, 2014 04:29 am
@Olivier5,
Quote:
The material that gets eroded doesn't vanish into thin air. Its sediments somewhere
sic

What the frog, latter day Lavoisier ?

Quote:
Sometimes we GAIN land mass thanks to erosion,


So mostly, land above sea level is lost to erosion rather than gained.

Quote:
So the idea that we're bound to lose land mass to erosion is just not logical.


Except that you've contradicted yourself so tell me everything else you don't know about logic honeysuckle.

The question posted is:

Quote:
are we gaining or losing land mass to erosion and the seas?
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Dec, 2014 08:26 am
@farmerman,
Exactly, it all depends where the eroded material sediments. A coastal erosion somewhere often means deposits along another coast somewhere else...
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Dec, 2014 08:39 am
@czok,
czok wrote:

are we gaining or losing land mass to erosion and the seas?

As a country, the US (as well as many developing/developed Asian countries) is gaining more mass then it's losing to diets.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Dec, 2014 11:04 am
@Miss L Toad,
Erosion is NOT leading to loss of land. If it was, we would already live in an ocean world. Erosion has been at work for as long as earth existed. Earth is geologicalky active and some mountains (alps, himalayas...) ARE STILL RISING.

I trust this answers the question clearly. If you still don't get it, ask someone else.
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 01:02 am
@Olivier5,
Quote:
Erosion is NOT leading to loss of land.


Erosion is literally loss of land mass (land above sea level).

I'm sure you are a lovely older person who ordinarily imagines himself to be knowledgeable, so perhaps you might benefit from refresher courses in English, Boolean logic and science.

Quote:
I trust this answers the question clearly. If you still don't get it, ask someone else.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 04:44 am
Technically you both are correct . The discipline of geomorphology includes engineering studies of erosion/deposition/isostasy as one of its "fun" areas.
There are several places on earth (The Ghat of Bengal, entire Pacific nations) where rising sea levels are swallowing up the land and coastl erosion is its tool. However, most areas are actually in some form of rebound (either tectonic or isostatic) where even submereged lands are rising above local base levels. (and even base levels vary between ocean bsins )
My favorite spot in the US for geomorphology on the hoof is the Presumpscot Formation of the coast of Maine. Here are some thick Pleistocene aged marine deposits of layered glacial outwash deposits and clearly deposits of eroded and poorly sorted material that contain recent (Pleistocene and Holocene) marine fossils (molluscs, fish, a few whales etc). And they all are 'draped" over the older bedrock and earlier coastal marine sediments of the Maine coast.

Everything had eroded shoreward during glacial times and these resultant deposits were in waters up to 100 feet deep. Now they lie high and dry and harrass well drillers and beach front developers with their very dense clays and silts that are NOT glacially compressed.

Erosion is a process not a fixed destination. While everything obeys gravity, upward forces also exist. There were NEVER any world-wide floods through geologic time that are evidenced


0 Replies
 
 

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