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How CoyWolves have evolved in the Northeast US

 
 
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2014 05:34 pm
A very interesting article related to hybridization and the evolution of new species:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/17/magazine/should-you-fear-the-pizzly-bear.html?_r=0

Quote:
One lesson of hybridization might be anthropomorphized thus: When times are tough, it’s better to mate with someone — even the wrong one — than with no one at all.
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farmerman
 
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Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2014 06:43 pm
@rosborne979,
I know that theyd been a mjor vent in the area of Ontario North of Algonquin Provincial Park nd West of the Sudbury. The coyotes were expanding their rabges an overlapped with some of the wolves territory. I guess they mated and the subspecies began in the 1800'.
Ive told you everything I remember from an ancient article in the Tues Science section of the NYTimes. I think it was one by Nick Wade so you can look up his by-line and see if theres an article bout these things.
farmerman
 
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Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2014 06:51 pm
@farmerman,
I just finished reding the rticlle an am kinda surprised at how much of this stuff this guy lifted from other writers and cientists. He only missed the 3 century genetic isolation phenom and evolution of the anadromous fish in the Connecticut River . Where the menhaden had been trapped behind old power dams since the early 1700's, they've developed smaller sizes, different fin structures allowing them to "hover" in the stiller waters and, most surprising, they've developed Gill strainers for eating algae like baleen whales strain the water for crud.
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2014 07:36 pm
@rosborne979,
Another quote from the article:
Quote:
“Biodiversity has developed in a web of life rather than a tree of life,” Arnold told me. That interconnectedness lends strength. “It’s sort of cool that evolution is really messy.”
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Aug, 2014 07:43 pm
@farmerman,
I suspect that human evolution in relation to neanderthals may have been very much like the CoyWolves.

And I wouldn't be surprised if most species which live in close proximity to their "cousins" increase their genetic diversity through hybridization. I would guess that this type of behavior would be more prevalent when populations get small, which may be why we see evolutionary accelerations immediately after population declines.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2014 08:16 am
@rosborne979,
Mybe, but extreme hybridization seems to impose limits of viability. (usually extreme hybrids are, most often than not, sterile). Since speciation is a hard definition, so is what defines a successful hybrid. When does hybrid vigor end and lethality begin?
oralloy
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2014 02:11 pm
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:
I suspect that human evolution in relation to neanderthals may have been very much like the CoyWolves.

It is very likely that Caucasian skin coloration evolved in Neanderthals and then was transferred to Europeans via interbreeding.

For what it's worth, there was a PBS show about Coywolves about a year ago. Probably an episode of Nature or Nova I think.
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2014 08:07 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Mybe, but extreme hybridization seems to impose limits of viability.

There certainly is a point at which reproduction stops working (sterile offspring). But at every point before that I think there is probably a large benefit to both populations through the increase in variation.

In the case of the Coywolves this type of variation within the population led relatively quickly to a new breed of Canis which fit the available ecosystem. And this particular ecosystem is changing rapidly which is also interesting because the dynamic environment seems to have given rise to a dynamic gene pool which allows the organism(s) to adapt faster which is what they need.
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