1
   

Are you a good Googler

 
 
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:04 am
I've been there unsuccessfully, principally because I don't know the basic fiscal and pecuniary language. Of course dogfood has always qualified in "the more you buy the cheaper it gets" but I'd like to know if electricity rates too had ever decreased with increasing usage, unlike today when instead they increase

Incidentally I'd also like to know a term that distinguishes between these two effects. So far "inverse demand function" is the closest I have come, but still not quite right
 
View best answer, chosen by dalehileman
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:13 am
@dalehileman,
This is the same question as you asked earlier. Why create another thread?

dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:26 am
@Ragman,
If I've offended you Rag I apologize most profusely. Sometimes a subject gets additional responses if restated in slightly altered form but thank you for your interest in my postings

http://able2know.org/topic/249730-1
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:26 am
@dalehileman,
Furthermore, you're comparing apples with pears when you query about the dynamics of buying quantity of dog food and buying quantity of kw/hr. The dynamics of Supply and Demand of the electrical grid is far different than a factory that produces bulk supply (and discounting pricing) of dog food.

As you know in electric supply industry you can't grow the grid so easily these day because people don't want the power plant in the backyard (NIMBY). Whereas with dog food industry you can either ramp up supply/distribution/production or build another (clean) dog food factory and maintain scale of costs.

That also speaks to the pricing dynamics of charging higher rates at peak periods...when they charge you more if you squeeze the grid harder at peak times.
Ragman
 
  3  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:31 am
@dalehileman,
I took no offense. I was attempting top offer you some constructive criticism. If you could consolidate like topics in one place you are MORE LIKELY to get an answer to that question - not less likely. It is slightly annoying to see more than one or even several new topics on basically the same subject.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:36 am
@Ragman,
Thank you Rag but discounting economic differences as well as those of demand, there ought to be words distinguishing the inclining from the declining block rate

Incidentally all this arose from my desire to learn in which of three categories electricity qualified when I was a kid. Googling general terms like the above garnered millions of hits; so if I only had the correct terms I'd more quickly find a pertinent hit

Would you Rag happen to have been around then and if so do you remember. Or are you a better Googler than I

Probably so, in any case
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:40 am
@Ragman,
Quote:
….annoying…..on basically the same subject.
Again, Rag, once more, anon, my most sincere and groveling mea culpas

But again, once more, wonder if (1) by chance you might have been around in the '40's remember whether declining, directly proportional, or inclining. Even better yet if (2) you could supply interrelated terms for these states that might facilitate Googling, and if not (3) whether you might find the search I describe much easier than I
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:49 am
@dalehileman,
no need for an apology. Just stick to one post and that'll make it easier for people to answer you.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:49 am
Check out the data on these pages

http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/annual/index.cfm
Quote:
EIA has expanded the Monthly Energy Review (MER) to include annual data as far back as 1949 for those data tables that are found in both the Annual Energy Review (AER) and the MER . During this transition, EIA will not publish the 2012 edition of the AER.

In the list of tables below, grayed-out table numbers now go to MER tables that contain 1949-2012 (and later) data series. New interactive tables and graphs have also been added and are currently on EIA's Beta site.


http://www.eia.gov/electricity/data.cfm


Quote:
Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel consumption, sales, prices and customers.



And here is one specific to California.

http://energyalmanac.ca.gov/electricity/
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:53 am
@Butrflynet,
also:

http://www.eia.gov/electricity/data/state/
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:54 am
@Butrflynet,
From the EIA site


http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/images/2013.07.03/history.png
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 11:54 am
@Butrflynet,
Thank you most kindly But for those links which I shall peruse at first opportunity but yard work is calling

Meanwhile to give me more time to cultivate Better Half and Family I wonder which of them more likely answer my specific query, that is in which of the three categories electricity fell during the '40's

Again thank you for your interest in my q's
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 12:00 pm
@Butrflynet,
From

http://m.cnsnews.com/news/article/terence-p-jeffrey/electricity-price-index-soars-new-record-start-2014-us-electricity


http://m.cnsnews.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/large/images/ELECTRICTY%20PRICE%20INDEX-1952-JANUARY%202014.jpg
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 12:02 pm
@dalehileman,
You'll have to invest your own time in doing the reading and analysis of the data.

It is time for me to go swim laps.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 12:07 pm
@Butrflynet,
Quote:
You'll have to invest your own time in doing the reading and analysis of the data.
Yes it does look that way doesn't it; but at 83 with incipioent Alz's…..

….hoped to find a shortcut, somebody else who might remember. Guess not many of us still around

Quote:
It is time for me to go swim laps.
OT but breaches an interesting subject, pool temp. For a couple of years now in spite of drought and global warming, out here in the Mojave it's been too cold (presently about 84 f)

No response expected
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 12:29 pm
@dalehileman,
So far it would seem the declining block rate is seldom available to the wretched consumer

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=consumer+declining+block+rate+electricity

Fellas, only if I'm not wearing you out, what might be the term for the third condition, a directly proportional block rate where the cost of a product is directly proportional to quantity
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 12:56 pm
@dalehileman,
how about reading some of the info in the links? That should explain to you what you're asking, I believe.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 01:11 pm
Oddly, there used to be a discount for high electric consumption. Total electric homes were all the rage as it got you a discount regardless of consumption.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 01:42 pm
@dalehileman,
There is three or more level of generator plants and the base load stations are the one running at all times and the ones that cost the lest per kilo-watts hours to run, when the demands go over the base generating capability you bring up the spinning reserves from older plants that are not as efficient in generating power and therefore cost more.

Then you have peak demand generators that can crank one a hell of a lot of power out at far greater cost such as generators power by jet engines!!!!

Of course you can also buy power from other systems or bring older plants online that is not in the spinning reserves.

But to sum up the furthers you go over the demands that the base load stations can meet the greater is the cost to the electric companies per kilo-watts.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 01:49 pm
@roger,
Quote:
Oddly, there used to be a discount for high electric consumption.
Thank you Rog. Wondering if that was a consumer discount and if so can you provide a link

Many thanks
 

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