cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Oct, 2018 09:34 pm
@Setanta,
Nevsky Prospekt is one of the main roads in St Petersburg, and I have walked it during my visit to Russia many decades ago. It was a Volga River cruise from Moscow to St Petersburg. I remember visiting a cemetery at the end of that road where Tchaikovsky is interred. On our way back to our river boat on the bus, I had the driver drop me off at the cemetery so I could visit his grave. I took some pictures, but can't seem to locate them now. I'll try to remember, and post them here if I find it. I found it on the internet. https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-st-petersburg-russia-tikhvin-cemetery-tchaikovsky-91100343.html. My wife and I used to attend the SF Symphony for over 13 years until I got tired of the driving into San Francisco, and just loved Tchaikovsky's music. Listened to some of the great conductors including Seiji Ozawa, Leonard Bernstein, Michael Tilson Thomas, and musicians such as Midori, Itschak Pearlman, Yo Yo Ma, and so many more. I also attended a Jerry Goldsmith concert at the Barbacan in London, and it was based on all the movies he provided music for. That one was really unforgettable. Also attended concerts in St Petersburg at the Marinsky Theater, and we came out of the theater after 10pm, it was still daylight.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Oct, 2018 10:29 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Well, I've tried to converse with you in this and several other threads. I won't be making that mistake again.


Well (Harrumph) I beg your pardon, the last thing I remember you saying to me directly was to tell me to piss off. So, I did, I actually pissed off, I avoid you as much as possible. I have done my part to appease you, and that still isn't GOOD enough???? You have been crystal clear on this forum that you can barely tolerate me, and truly thats fine, I'm an acquired taste, simply not for everybody. Perhaps I've misconstrued your remarks as patronizing, but I doubt it. I think even you would agree you are difficult, prickly and intemperate man on this board. You are quick to anger, that's fine with with me because I am as well. I reserve the right to respond when you follow my remarks in a belittling fashion. You should never forget that if you expect the freedom to bark at people, then you shouldn't get all hurt feelings when someone barks back. Really man, what are you thinking?
My grandmother summed it up famously when I was about 9 or 10 years old, when I heard her say "You might be able to stick that umbrella up my butt, but don't try to open it and tell me it's raining".
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Oct, 2018 12:01 am
@glitterbag,
Now you know why Canada ran out of legal dope on day 1.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Oct, 2018 04:15 am
You never pass up the opportunity to take a cheap shot, whether or not it's your business. I see that as the measure of what passes for character at your house.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Oct, 2018 06:06 am
@Setanta,
Now I'm bereft because your opinion is one I really value.

GB is my friend and you were indulging in your typical Maxian passive/aggressive bullshit so I decided to pierce your pomposity.

It's so easy to do. And let's face it you're only jealous, because you can't come up with anything as pithy as my lost post you sulk and call it a cheap shot.

Now you go and run off crying to Beth, that's your bloody character.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Oct, 2018 07:45 am
Broadland during the First World War is a website accompanying an exhibition/research, showing the impact of the First World War on the people of Broadland [Norfolk, England], from the perspectives of the men who went to war and those who remained at home.
Stories, photos and films include the first ever Zeppelin air raid in the UK whch took place in 1915 over Great Yarmouth; invasion scares; spy mania; the wounded brought to Brundall and Ingham; and the overall impact of the war on family life.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Oct, 2018 06:08 am
@Walter Hinteler,
To commemorate the moment, when the guns fell silent, Benjamin Britten's 'War Requiem', a timeless and profoundly moving exploration of man’s inhumanity to man, is played for instance in Hannover and Liverpool by the 'Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra' and the 'NDR Radiophilharmonie Hannover' (plus choirs from both cities) or in Greifswald, Szczecin, Klaipėda and Berlin by orchestras from Mecklenburg-West Pomerania (Theater Vorpommern), Poland ( Opera na Zamku), and Lithuania (Klaipėda music theater).
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 24 Oct, 2018 07:39 pm
@izzythepush,
Ha . . . what a pathetic little man you are, and, as always, a legend in your own mind. Pithy? You need to look that up.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 01:27 am
@Setanta,
I'm impressed, it only took you four days to come up with that. You must have really worked up a sweat, even if you did reuse the phrase legend in your own mind. Other phrases are available, invest in a thesaurus, or failing that any dinosaur will do.

GB said something nice about my post and you couldn't stand that so you wrote a snotty passive aggressive response in the style of your mentor Max. You were called out on it, and instead of doing the decent thing and apologising to her you went on this spiteful little cliché ridden tirade.

Constipated ennui may play well out in the sticks, but the rest of the world has moved on. Try investing in some laxatives.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 01:40 am
You really don't care what discussions you crap all over, as long as you get to be the center of attention, however briefly. You are the one in this thread who is most like Max. I hope and trust that you will have a truly lousy day.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 02:41 am
@Setanta,
Don't talk crap. You attacked GB in a cowardly snide way because she was nice about me. That's what started this little exchange. Then when I came in supporting GB you went off on one.

If anyone is desperate to be the centre of attention it's you.

Let's face it I came up with something topical and relevant straight after reading your attack on GB. You festered for four days only to come up with another hackneyed cliché straight out of Oralloy's playbook.

When you'd not replied for four days I had thought that, uncharacteristically, you'd decided to maintain a dignified silence. Instead you were seething with impotent rage for four days only to come up with something so very predictable and so very dull.

Why not stick to what you know best, regurgitating chunks of Wikipedia, and leave the real history to Walter. He makes it interesting.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 03:38 am
@izzythepush,
Ha, you really think that this is all about you personally? That's just incredible. I didn't attack her. I said that she didn't need to make a snotty remark; which, apparently, was just because I had supplied a better historical narrative than what she had surmised. Then I pointed out that that is what we do in history threads. It had absolutely nothing to do with you. It may come as a surprise to you, but people are not fixated on you.

Went off on one what? You really think anyone reading here will buy that sweetness and light characterization of your typical, vicious personal attack? Do you consider yourself so important in my life, or the life of anyone else here that anyone would spend days thinking of a response to your customary viciousness? That's just incredible.

I believe that you really need professional help, or you need to stay off the internet until you can develop a sense of proportion. That entire narrative us so far divorced from reality that it's surreal.
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 04:36 am
They Shall Not Grow Old
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 06:11 am
@hightor,
Fascinating.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 06:53 am
@panzade,
"Reenactment" has always existed. Today's highly controversial reenactment of historical events with play scenes in supposedly "objective" documentaries was a common stylistic device in the 1920s. Only about 12 percent, at best almost 20 percent, of the pictorial material of old documentary films about the First World War shows actual acts of war, the rest of the sometimes very spectacular images were later recreated or taken during manoeuvres.

Or it came straight from feature films. If you were lucky, even the participants took part, such as the French Marshall Petain, hero of Verdun, who in the 1920s put on his old uniform again for film shots and posed at original locations.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 10:36 am
@Setanta,
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 01:51 pm
I agree, that was a great find by Hightor. Walter posted some "colorized" photos of German troops in the Great War. I don't recall if that was in this thread, but I'll have to check later.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 04:54 pm
The colorized photos did not come from Walter (at least in this thread), but from a member whose name I do not recognize. You can click here to visit that post, which has a link to the photos. The link to the photos is "safe," I checked it out.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Oct, 2018 01:11 am
I was driving through Dorset yesterday, I saw quite a few of these.

https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/resources/images/6784083/?type=responsive-gallery-fullscreen

Quote:
The Royal British Legion (RBL) in Dorset has announced it will be supporting the Silent Soldier campaign in honour of British troops who fought and died in the First World War 100 years ago.

Near life-size silhouettes of a First World War ‘Tommy’ will be fixed on buildings, gardens, fields, and roundabouts across the county, in remembrance of those in the armed forces who came home ‘silently’ from the war, as well as those who never made it home.

Businesses and local authorities are being invited to support the campaign by sponsoring and displaying one or more silhouettes from September this year until late 2018, when the nation will commemorate the armistice and the end of the war.

Ian Jarvis, community fundraiser for RBL Dorset, said: “The idea was the brainchild of our counterpart in Surrey, who have had amazing success marketing these across their county.

“The Silent Soldier silhouettes have at their base the words 1914-1918 Lest We Forget but any business or similar undertaking can buy and sponsor a silhouette and have its company name incorporated in the base.”

Peter Wakeham of RBL Surrey, who came up with the idea, said: “The theme of this idea is ‘coming home’.

“Silent Soldiers will appear just as the soldiers did in 1918 when they were coming home.

“This is to commemorate that and show respect to them.

“We want people to see the soldiers, take an interest, and want to find out more about the war.

“We are hoping it will be adopted across the country.”

The Royal British Legion is marking the centenary of the First World War with a variety of commemorations and projects from 2014-2018 aimed at remembrance and education.

Other projects run by the charity include Never Forgotten, 1,566 miniature sculptures created by British artist Nic Joly to mark each day that the war was fought, and Women at War 100, remembering the creation of the British Army’s first all-female unit in 1917.

The soldier silhouettes are cut from black cut dibond and are tough and weatherproof.

They will also be supplied with bolts and angle iron posts for freestanding display.

Flyers with details of the scheme are being handed out and the progress of the scheme will be reported on social media.


https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/15511740.The_Silent_Soldier_silhouettes_coming_to_roundabouts__buildings_and_fields_across_Dorset/

This is in addition to the outlines all over the country commemorating those who did not return.

https://cached.imagescaler.hbpl.co.uk/resize/scaleHeight/414/cached.offlinehbpl.hbpl.co.uk/galleries/ORP/WW1TommiesappearatBigPitNationalCoalMuseuminSouthWales.jpg
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Oct, 2018 07:19 am
@Setanta,
The FB page where these appeared originally.

https://www.facebook.com/ww1incolour/
 

Related Topics

World War I - Question by einsteinius
THE GREAT WAR - Discussion by Setanta
 
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