Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Oct, 2018 07:22 am
@panzade,
Cool, Boss . . . thanks.

(I'm not clever about tracking such things down on-line.)
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Oct, 2018 07:28 am
@Setanta,
There was a little brouhaha on Pinterest about that site not giving credit to the FB site. Made it easy to track down.😎
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Oct, 2018 07:36 am
@Setanta,
The European Film Gateway gives access to around 3'000 historic films (and images and texts from selected collections of 38 film archives across Europe) related to the First World War: >EFG1914 project<
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 2 Nov, 2018 09:31 am
@Walter Hinteler,
One hundred years have passed since the ending of World War I, "the war to end all wars." In the October 2018 issue of Smithsonian Magazine, American author William Vollmann travels to the former front lines of the Great War and asks, in a nod to Erich Maria Remarque's famous novel, if all is still quiet on the western front. Vollmann's long-form essay weaves together historical events, references to primary historical documents and secondary interpretations, and his own experiences at battle sites and conversations with local residents a century later. The result is a lengthy and meditative "attempt at remembrance," intriguingly described by Vollmann as "peculiar, accidental and limited," which brings readers to battle sites in eastern France and reflects on myriad perspectives on the war throughout history. Vollmann is the author of Europe Central, winner of the 2005 National Book Award for Fiction. This article also features photography by Tomas van Houtryve, an award-winning documentary photographer based in Paris.

Is All Still Quiet on the Western Front?
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2018 03:00 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
The Western Front defined:
The Western Front was a military theatre of World War II encompassing Denmark, Norway, Luxembourg, Belgium, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and Germany. World War II military engagements in Southern Europe and elsewhere are generally considered under separate headings.
Western Front (World War II) - Wikipedia
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 4 Nov, 2018 09:03 am
Zeppelin crash victims' relatives make peace
Quote:
The great-grandson of a Grimsby trawler captain who left 16 Germans to die on a crashed Zeppelin has met a relative of one of those who perished.

Pat Thompson wanted to meet Emile Specht, whose uncle Heinrich drowned in the North Sea in 1916.

Mr Thompson's grandfather William Martin found the airship while fishing off the coast of Grimsby, with the Germans still alive and clinging to the wreckage.

He ordered his trawler to turn away rather than save the men, who all died.
(Video at above link.)
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2018 07:50 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The First World War captured in film
Quote:
100 years ago, the horror ended on the battlefields of the First World War. The cinema has captured these memories — in famous feature films and in a documentary sensation.
[...]
Now, advanced digital technology makes it possible to perfectly colorize old black-and-white footage and set it to sound. In this vein, a documentary film was recently premiered at the London Film Festival, which viewers saw as a sensation: They Shall Not Grow Old by Peter Jackson.
[...]
To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the war on Nov. 11, various film distributors are also offering premium DVD editions of classic films, such as these three cinematic masterpieces.

Westfront 1918 (1930)

Georg Wilhelm Pabst's Westfront 1918 is often compared to the even more famous All Quiet on the Western Front, which was first screened in cinemas at about the same time. Both are undoubtedly anti-war films, but Pabst's film is, according to contemporary and later critics, the more committed film to this end. In Westfront 1918, one of the first German talkies, the director depicts the experiences of four German soldiers at the front in the last year of war and shows episodes from their home leave.

Pabst used a very realistic narrative style. In contrast to many popular films of the time glorifying the war, Westfront 1918 shows the war in all its brutal facets — death, injury, and madness. "The war film Westfront 1918 rejects the most furtive transfiguration of war as a place of human probation," the film historian Enno Patalas said of Pabst's ruthless work.

The film was banned in 1933; the Nazis had clearly recognized the director's cinematic pacifism.

Kameradschaft (1931)

In 1931, Pabst shot Kameradschaft (Comradeship). Even though the plot of the film is not set during the First World War, it is still a record of the post-war period. Kameradschaft depicts the fatal late consequences of combative conflict and the deep mistrust between the French and the Germans after 1918.

Over a decade after the end of the war, a devastating mining accident occurs in France near the German border. The film shows how German miners decide on a selfless rescue operation, which helps saves the lives of many French miners. French and Germans thus shake hands.

A special feature of Kameradschaft is that the film was shot in two languages, with the Germans and the French speaking their own language. There was no synchronization of the respective foreign languages, and subtitles were also omitted.

"Several scenes and twists in the plot live precisely from the fact that misunderstandings arise through the lack of a common language," said Martin Koerber of Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum für Film und Fernsehen (German Cinemathek – Museum for Film and Television). Koerber was jointly responsible for the restoration of the film. Even today, the mistrust can be perceived when viewing the film, but also the attempts to overcome the lack of understanding.

Paths of Glory (1957)

A quarter of a century later, one of the most famous anti-war films in cinema history, Stanley Kubrick's Paths of Glory, was also an anti-class film — one that harshly and ruthlessly showed that war is also a war between different social classes, that of ordinary soldiers and officers.

Kubrick focused on the trench warfare between Germans and French in his film, exploring like Pabst in Kameradschaft the "emotional solidarity across national borders," as write film scholars Bodo Traber and Hansjörg Edling in Filmgenre: Kriegsfilm (Film Genre: Anti-War Films). Here, however, it is exclusively the French side that comes into the picture.
... ... ...


0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2018 02:58 pm
Quote:
If you think the First World War began senselessly, consider how it ended.

New Yorker
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Fri 9 Nov, 2018 09:42 am
@hightor,
Good reading!
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Fri 9 Nov, 2018 09:44 am
The moment the Great War ended.

https://metro.co.uk/video/imperial-war-museum-approximate-end-wwi-1798600/?ito=vjs-link
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Fri 9 Nov, 2018 10:03 am
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/north-sydney-armistice-telegraph-messages-europe-1.4894214

Quote:
After four harrowing years, the message trickled in via Morse code on the morning of Nov. 10, 1918 at a telegraph office in North Sydney, N.S.

And before anyone else in North America knew, people in the small Cape Breton town had already begun to celebrate the joyous news direct from the War Office in London: an armistice would be signed the next day.

There had never been a known leak from the Western Union telegraph office on Court Street before that day, but this news was simply "too good to keep quiet," said Richard Rose, chair of the Nov. 10 commemoration committee with the North Sydney Historical Society.

"As you might guess, they were overjoyed, so that word very quickly leaked into the community and the party was on," he said.

"From what we can find in our research, it was just pandemonium​. People came out banging pots and pans."


Richard Rose, chair of the Nov. 10 commemoration committee with the North Sydney Historical Society, says celebrations broke out soon after the local Western Union telegraph office received word of an armistice. (Yvonne LeBlanc-Smith/CBC)
More than 300 U.S. personnel who were in North Sydney joined off-duty military personnel in a spontaneous parade around the town as part of a celebration that lasted all day.

In the evening, bonfires were lit and the festivities continued. Bars that would normally be closed on Sunday were opened, but they had to close early when they ran out of liquor.

"So effectively, by the time the rest of North America found out about the war being over, North Sydney was nursing a giant hangover," said Rose.

The telegrapher that received the momentous message was Annie Butler Smith.

The key she used that day is part of a display at the North Sydney Historical Museum.

"Of the more than 600 Western Union telegraph centres around the world, North Sydney was by far the busiest," said Rose.

"In 1913, before the war started, that centre processed over 30,000 messages a day."

A new building opened near the beginning of the war in December 1914, employing 325 people. Soon, the number of messages doubled or even tripled as all messages between North America and Western Europe came through North Sydney.

This Saturday, 100 years after that Morse code message, North Sydney will mark the end of the First World War and the town's unique place in history.

There will be a re-enactment of the receipt of the message starting at 9:30 a.m., followed by a parade, music and readings. The day will be capped with a bonfire at the Ballast Grounds at 6 p.m.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 9 Nov, 2018 10:34 am
@ehBeth,
https://i.imgur.com/YJYlC1Xl.jpg
"Gueules cassées, Versailles. 28 juin 1919"
These five face wounded were present when the Germans had to sign the peace treaty on 28 June 1919 in the Hall of Mirrors in Versailles.

Never before had so many people been exposed to such incredible brutality: Of the 60 million men who were under arms during the "primal catastrophe of the 20th century", about ten million died. Those who returned alive from cruel battles such as Verdun or the Somme were often broken in body and soul.

Experts estimate that 11 to 14 percent of the mentally and physically handicapped suffered severe facial injuries. For France alone, this was between 10,000 and 15,000 men, as historian Sophie Delaporte has reconstructed. German figures vary considerably, between just under 50,000 and around 100,000.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Nov, 2018 08:56 am
Armsice signers. Foch second from right.
Left of Foch in the photo (on Foch’s own right) is the senior British representative, Sir Rosslyn Wemyss. On the right is Admiral George Hope.
https://imageshack.com/a/img921/1449/ZCbKMG.jpg
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  2  
Reply Thu 29 Nov, 2018 08:14 pm
Interesting thread. Thanks to those who contributed substantive posts to it.

The perspective of time has added to the connectivity of World Wars I & II.. Indeed nearly all of the major forces and conflicts attendant to WWII can readily be traced to origins in WWI, and its direct consequences, and that is now widely understood.

Sadly WWI, for most of its participants, involved no real conflicts meriting, by any reasonable standard, the destruction of human lives and the wealth accumulated over centuries that resulted from this tragic conflict. Indeed the start of the 20th Century appeared to offer progress and prosperity throughout Europe. The Entente Cordial had ended a long period of mistrust and competition between the UK and France. From Russia to the UK economic growth appeared to offer real opportunities for the resolution of mutual long-standing social and economic divisions. As was previously noted in this thread, the various Royal houses on the continent were related, to varying degrees, offering the possibilities of significantly improved communication and understanding. Europe faced no serious external challenges of any sort, excluding some nascent unrest in portions of the British and French Empires.

There were also some serious underlying challenges between and among the competing major powers; An appetite for Empire and greater influence on the world stage, well illustrated by Kaiser Wilhelm, but also popular among German elites, along with the fears engendered by it among its neighbors; As yet unresolved social and political tensions in Russia, as it tried to cope with an ageing autocratic system and the social and economic tensions arising from the then rapid industrialization of the country. Both the UK and France were discovering the constraints that protecting their Empires imposes on national policy. Adding pervasive irritants to it all were merging ethnic and linguistic nationalism across Europe, including a Pan-Slavism movement in Central & Eastern Europe == that affected the Austro-Hungarian Empire more than the other states, but its side effects touched everything else as well.

None of this was beyond solution, particularly in the improving economic conditions that then prevailed. However, some particularly unstable and self-reinforcing elements of the alliances and plans that evolved among the principal powers in the years leading up to the war made them all vulnerable to an emerging crisis they could neither contain nor control.

Ultimately the assassination of the designated heir to the Austro Hungarian Empire in Sarajevo brought the curtain down on the whole Continent.

Truly a great tragedy. Moreover we are still dealing with the aftereffects in the Middle East and other areas.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 1 Dec, 2018 01:44 pm
@georgeob1,
Exactly 100 years ago, it was the birth of a dead state: the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes proclaimed its union. (Although known colloquially as "Yugoslavia", only in 1929 it was named "Kingdom of Yugoslavia" by King Alexander I.)

georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Dec, 2018 06:43 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
In addition to the creation of new states, only some of which are still lasting, there was a lot of boundary shifting in Europe in the Post War Treaty negotiations. Romania took all of the territory it had disputed with Hungary, France took disputed territory from Germany. The linguistic & cultural nationalism persisted and, as you noted, the Balkans and a good deal of Central Europe was still beset with disputed boundaries and stranded linguistic populations. In addition the armistice ending the fighting became a surrender after the fall of the German Government, and with its vengeful reparations the Treaty ending the war did almost as much as the War itself in setting the stage for the second act, which was to come just 2o years after the treaty was signed. More tragedy.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Dec, 2018 12:04 am
I do not for a moment believe that the Versailles Treaty lead to the second world war. John Maynard Keynes predicted that it would, even before the Paris Peace Conference had ended. He was pouting because Lloyd George did not treat him as the oracle that he believed himself to be. Right wing extremists in Germany latched on to that, but the evidence is just not there. Inflation had been rising in Germany since early 1914, long before the war broke out. The policies which ended run-away inflation were put in place by the Weimar government in the late 1920s. Germany's reparations debt was canceled in 1932. The two right wing parties which put Hitler in power--the NSDAP and the DNVP (the German National Peoples' Party)--both used the "Versailles Diktat" myth to bolster their public appeal. However, the fact is that Germany paid very little in cash towards the reparations, and most of what was "paid" were in-kind payments when the Allies simply packed up vehicles, machine tools and military equipment which they then carted home with them. In particular, France had a spirit of revenge--in 1871, Germany imposed reparations of 700,000,000 gold francs on France for a war which France certainly did not start. France then astounded the continent by paying off those reparations in under three years. But the 132 billion gold marks imposed on Germany was imposed by all of the Allies, with Britain joining France in calling for Germany to pay for the lives lost, the maiming of soldiers, damage to civilian property (the Germans had been particularly vicious in blowing things up as they were driven out of France) and pensions to widows and orphans. Such calculations would have been a pittance in 1871.

I consider the claim that the Versailles Treaty "caused" the second world war to be one of those false historical "verities" which persists simply because it has been repeated so often. For a good summary account, including Keynes' role, I recommend Paris 1919: Six Months that Changed the World, Margaret MacMillan, New York, Random House, 2002. In particular, the Versailles Diktat myth exculpates Hitler, the NDSAP and the other Fascosts of Europe, and the appeasers.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Dec, 2018 01:16 am
@Setanta,
That the Treaty of Versailles was a cause of the Second World War is a popular legend. But the conflicts that broke out after 1919 were of much older origin. The ground had long been prepared.

The fact that the Germans were so outraged by the treaty was mainly due to the fact that they did not want to admit their defeat in WWI. Instead, the belief prevailed that they had remained "undefeated in the field" and had lost the war only because of betrayal by "internal enemies".
I am convinced that in 1919 and afterwards, the Germans had found every treaty unfair that would have called them to account.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Dec, 2018 02:34 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Yes, that was Ludendorff's "stab in the back myth," n'est-ce pas?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Dec, 2018 03:45 am
@Setanta,
Bonne idée.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

World War I - Question by einsteinius
THE GREAT WAR - Discussion by Setanta
 
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