Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 11 Dec, 2014 01:56 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Food - and prices for food - seems to be a topic in Germany as well.
http://i61.tinypic.com/9znfad.jpg
From Hilden (mentioned already before, a town close to Düsseldorf, about 12,000 inhabitants in 1914) the regional newspaper "The Rhinish People's Paper" (Rheinisches Volksblatt) publishes on December 11 the police report about stolen chicken: several times and up 16 chicken were stolen at night, most probably by an ... especially trained dog.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Mon 15 Dec, 2014 09:30 am
15 DECEMBER 1914

BALKAN FRONT: Battered by a skillful Serbian counter-attack, Austro-Hungarian forces abandon Belgrade, which the Serbs quickly reoccupy.


It seems inexplicable that General Oskar Potiorek, who was in charge of security for Archduke Franz Ferdinand's visit to Sarajevo on 28 June, was also placed in charge of Austria-Hungary's two failed offensives into Serbia. Only after this latest disaster did Vienna finally relieve Potiorek of his command.

As was the case in all modern wars, the first months of World War I saw the dismissal of a large number of general officers who proved they were not up to the challenge of combat. That was true for Moltke and Prittwitz in Germany and Lanzerac in France, to name just a few. Austria-Hungary had better commanders than Potiorek (although they were all serving on the Eastern Front), so the decision to leave him in charge of the armies facing Serbia is somewhat baffling.

http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/portraits/POTIORE.JPG
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  3  
Reply Tue 16 Dec, 2014 04:29 am
16th December 1914.

Raid on Scarborough, Hartlepool and Whitby, England.


The first full scale bombardment on English soil took place 100 years ago today.

From Wiki.....

The raid on Scarborough, Hartlepool and Whitby, which took place on 16 December 1914, was an attack by the Imperial German Navy on the British seaport towns of Scarborough, Hartlepool, West Hartlepool, and Whitby. The attack resulted in 137 fatalities and 592 casualties, many of whom were civilians. The attack resulted in public outrage towards the German navy for an attack against civilians, and against the Royal Navy for its failure to prevent the raid.

The German Navy had been seeking opportunities to draw out small sections of the British fleet which it could trap and destroy. Shortly before, a raid on Yarmouth had produced few results but demonstrated the potential for fast raiding into British waters. On 16 November, Rear Admiral Franz Hipper—commander of the German battlecruiser squadron—persuaded his superior, Admiral Friedrich von Ingenohl, to ask the Kaiser's permission for a raid. U-17 was sent to investigate the area near Scarborough and Hartlepool for coastal defences. The submarine reported little onshore defence, no mines within 12 mi (10 nmi; 19 km) of the shore and a steady stream of shipping. It was also believed that two British battlecruisers—which would be the fast ships sent out first to investigate any attack—had been despatched to South America, where they had taken part in the Battle of the Falkland Islands.

Hipper's force included the battlecruisers SMS Seydlitz, Von der Tann, Moltke and Derfflinger, the slightly smaller armoured cruiser SMS Blücher, four light cruisers SMS Strassburg, Graudenz, Kolberg and Stralsund and 18 destroyers. Ingenohl took the 85 ships of the German High Seas Fleet to a position just east of the Dogger Bank, where they could assist if Hipper's ships came under attack from larger forces, but were still safely close to Germany as standing orders from the Kaiser instructed.

More:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raid_on_Scarborough,_Hartlepool_and_Whitby


http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/11/30/239B9B1200000578-2854786-image-78_1417345921619.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/11/30/239B9C1F00000578-2854786-image-72_1417345878748.jpg

Snippet of Aftermath (from Wiki)....

The raid had an enormous effect upon British public opinion, both as a rallying cry against Germany for an attack upon civilians, and in generating criticism of the Royal Navy for being unable to prevent it. The attack became part of a British propaganda campaign, 'Remember Scarborough', used on army recruitment posters. Editorials in neutral America condemned it.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/11/30/239B9AC000000578-2854786-image-117_1417347281206.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/11/30/239B9CD300000578-2854786-image-116_1417347275444.jpg
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Thu 25 Dec, 2014 09:33 am
25 DECEMBER 1914

WESTERN FRONT: A general, yet unofficial, Christmas truce is observed, and, in several sectors, opposing troops spontaneously meet in no-man's land to exchange mementos and hold prayer services. Reports of soccer matches between German and British soldiers are, however, unsubstantiated.


The Christmas Truce is one of the most famous episodes from the first year of the Great War, and has been the subject of books and at least one movie. It seems to have been largely confined to the front in Flanders, where British and German forces faced each other. The French had launched an offensive in Champagne only a week before, and fighting along that sector would continue until February. There were a few similar scenes of fraternization on the Eastern Front, although the Russian soldiers would not celebrate Orthodox Christmas until January.


http://www.vets-cars.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Christmas-Truce.jpg

https://aphr.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/trucedm2603_468x252.jpg
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Dec, 2014 02:09 pm
@joefromchicago,
A photo from Christmas Eve (traditionally the day, when Christmas is celebrated in Germany), taken from a diary (posted by the great-grandson here), titled: "The Lord may punish England!"

http://i59.tinypic.com/1zge2r8.jpg

From the thesis “A REMARKABLE INSTANCE”: THE
CHRISTMAS TRUCE AND ITS ROLE IN THE CONTEMPORANEOUS NARRATIVE OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR
:
Quote:
To recapitulate the conventional historical interpretation of the episode,
the Christmas truce was a moment of sanity in the midst of the brutal and
senseless lunacy of the First World War. Keegan sums up the entire event in a short paragraph:
Early on the morning of Christmas Day, the Germans in the line opposite
the British, between Ypres and Messines, began to sing Christmas carols
and display Christmas trees on their parapet. Germans then came forward
into no-man’s-land and proposed a break in the fighting. Parties from both
sides began to mingle, to exchange tobacco and drinks, to sing together,
and, in one place, to organize a football match. They also agreed to allow
burial of the dead in no-man’s-land. The truce persisted the following day
and in places for some days afterwards but the high command on both
sides disapproved and took measures to stop the fraternization. There
was none on the French front.38
Unfortunately, this account, in common with so many of those cited, is riddled with inaccuracies.39
[...]
Footnote 39
Those errors are, in order: (1) In most cases the singing and Christmas-tree-lighting took place on
Christmas Eve, and in some cases the suggestion of a truce came on Christmas Eve as well; (2)
Belgian and French troops participated as well, although not in the same numbers or proportion as
British and German troops; (3) As can be seen on the detailed map provided in the Brown/Seaton
book, there were no recorded instances of truces from Ypres to Messines; the area covered was in
fact Messines to (almost) La Bassee – a distance at least four times as long; (4) Not all Germans
sang, although a number did. Some also displayed Christmas trees, but this was mainly on
Christmas Eve, when they could be lit and seen; (5) Part of the time, the Germans came forward.
Mostly, troops arranged the truce orally before advancing en masse into No Man’s Land, or sent
out a lone man, obviously unarmed, to start negotiations for the truce; (6) In some cases, a break
in the fighting was proposed. In some cases, soldiers only asked for a brief ceasefire for the purposes of burying the dead; (7) There were many instances of full scale fraternization but in
many other cases, troops did only some or none of the things Keegan lists; (8) In some cases, the
purpose of the truce was merely to bury the dead; (9) The truce persisted to the next day for some
troops. For others, it ended immediately after burying the dead, or when the soldiers had prearranged
for it to end: in late afternoon, in the early evening, or after midnight; (10) The high
command did not take many steps to stop the fraternization, as mostly it ended on its own
without interference – generally when the troops opposite rotated out of the trenches, which
usually occurred within 1-3 days after Christmas Day, as when no attack or campaign was
underway troops usually rotated out of the trenches every three to four days; and (11) Although
the number of French troops participating was relatively small compared to the British, there
certainly were, as already noted, instances of French/German truces.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Jan, 2015 12:19 pm
19 JANUARY 1915

HOMEFRONT - UNITED KINGDOM: Germany launches its first Zeppelin bombing raid against Great Britain, with the airships L3, L4, and L6 setting out on a two-day mission. The L6 turned back with engine troubles, but the remaining Zeppelins went ahead, striking the coastal towns of Great Yarmouth and King's Lynn in Norfolk. Among the casualties in Great Yarmouth were sixteen injured and four dead - two in each town.


This initial raid highlighted some of the limitations of aerial warfare in the early days of World War I. The intended target of the raid was the shipping and industrial area of the Humber estuary, but the prevailing winds meant that the airships struck much farther south. On the other hand, the British were largely defenseless against the Zeppelin attacks. No airplane could reach the heights that Zeppelins could attain, and even if they could, they lacked the kind of armament that would be needed to bring the enormous airships down.

http://i4.coventrytelegraph.net/incoming/article7425236.ece/alternates/s615/JS22695396.jpg

http://www.edp24.co.uk/polopoly_fs/1.1182883.1327068639!/image/2187996026.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_630/2187996026.jpg
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Jan, 2015 01:39 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:

Among the casualties in Great Yarmouth were sixteen injured and four dead - two in each town.

That's what I meant to write. Embarrassed
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Fri 23 Jan, 2015 12:47 pm
@joefromchicago,
Since it's a weekend - "movie time"

From 1915:
Quote:
I. English language version of a German newsreel item on a nurse on the bridge of a hospital ship in home waters, 1915.

II. English language version of a German newsreel item on a visit by Princess Alexandra Victoria to a military hospital in Germany, early 1915.

III. English language version of a German newsreel item on a visit by the King and Queen of Bavaria to a military hospital in Munich, early 1915.

IV. English language version of a German newsreel item on cooking food by chemical means, probably early 1915.

V. English language version of a German newsreel item on troops resting, early 1915.

VI. English language version of a German newsreel item on horsemen assembling a transport column, probably Western Front, 1915.

VII. English language version of a German newsreel item on troops about to leave for the front lines, Western Front, early 1915.

VIII. English language version of a German newsreel item on a field battery in training, probably in Germany, 1915.

IX. English language version of a German newsreel item on German troops on the Ypres Ridges, Western Front, probably early 1915.

X. English language version of a German newsreel item on a field bakery and butchers, probably Western Front, 1915.

XI. English language version of a German newsreel item on the Kaiser visiting his troops, probably Eastern Front, winter 1914-1915.

XII. English language version of a German newsreel item on the Kaiserin visiting a hospital train, possibly Berlin, 1915.

Full description
The hospital ship is at anchor, with other vessels in the far distance. On the bridge a nurse, assisted by a sailor, is handling the wheel.

Princess Alexandra Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein, wife of Prince August Wilhelm, inspects ambulance drivers on parade in the snow, then looks over a hospital train in a siding.

King Ludwig III of Bavaria and his wife inspect the exterior of the hospital buildings. Their son, Doctor Prince Ludwig of Bavaria, a qualified medical officer in charge of a hospital train, meets them beside the train as it starts to unload wounded soldiers.

The demonstration is given in close-up, in the open, by a soldier wearing thick protective gloves. Quicklime has been inserted into the base of a tin of food. After a few minutes the soldier opens the tin with a can-opener and shows that the stew inside is boiling.

The men appear to be holding a joke pageant, which seems to be mocking the British Army.

The men dash about in all directions, harnessing and setting up the column, which then moves off. The caption, describing this as "German militia occupy a French town", is incorrect.

The men are the reserve battalion of an Infantry regiment. They line up in a column and an officer moves from man to man checking the condition of their rifles - a battle-check, not a parade.

Six observers for the battery ride up, dismount, and take up a stance with binoculars. 77mm field guns are galloped into positions in the open and ready to fire. The captions describe this as being at the front.

Snow is falling quite heavily, and some of the men go down into their dugouts. Others, including some pipe-smoking veterans, remain on the surface.

The open-air Army bakery is in the rest areas, producing loaves while nearby butchers start to cut up carcasses draped over their tables.

The men are drawn up on parade beside a road in the snow. The Kaiser's car arrives and he talks with his officers before again driving off.

The train is in a main-line station. Kaiserin Auguste Victoria inspects the train (outside only) talking with the officers and nurses.


http://i61.tinypic.com/13ym369.jpg

Video: >BERLIN NEWS SERVICE REPORTS<
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Jan, 2015 04:13 pm
Saw a fascinating documentary on Kaiser Wilhelm on PBS last night.
The implication was that his personality assured the world would go to war.
Robert Massie
Quote:
Germany's monarch, Kaiser Wilhelm II had a withered and useless left arm caused by the use of forceps when he was born that also affected him psychologically and emotionally.

He never wanted himself or Germany to appear weak; hence he developed a strong will, an aggressive demeanor and an arrogance that led to a complex mix of stubbornness and instability.

He had no real political power, but appointed those who did - notably the chiefs of the army and navy, and the Chancellor, or Prime Minister.

Wilhelm blamed a Sottish doctor for his withered arm and an English surgeon for the death of his father
What was once a love of the English became a jealous hatred.
http://www.pbs.org/greatwar/chapters/ch1_voices1.html
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Fri 23 Jan, 2015 04:52 pm
@panzade,
panzade wrote:

The implication was that his personality assured the world would go to war.

That theory isn't original with Massie - it has been trotted out continuously since ... well, probably since 1914. In my opinion, it's largely bunk. A review of the events during the July Crisis show that Kaiser Wilhelm really wasn't directing German policy. Indeed, he spent much of it sailing around in his yacht. It could be said that the key event which assured that Germany would go to war was the decision to enter into the Dual Alliance with Austria-Hungary in 1879, nine years prior to Wilhelm's accession to the throne. The Dual Alliance assured that Germany would be dragged, sooner or later, into a war that involved Austria-Hungary's doomed attempts to stave off its inevitable disintegration.

The Dual Alliance was Bismarck's doing - Wilhelm didn't have his fingerprints on it. At most, Wilhelm can be faulted for preferring the alliance with Austria-Hungary over that with Russia, which can indeed be viewed as a mistake, as it guaranteed Germany's encirclement. But Germany had to pick one or the other - the Dreikaiserbund couldn't long accommodate both Austria-Hungary and Russia, whose interests clashed in the Balkans. For Germany, it was either alienate Russia and risk a war in the future, or destabilize its neighbor and risk a situation that could threaten Germany's own safety. Germany was faced with two options, both of them bad, but that was the fate of a large power stuck in the middle of Europe. Its security dilemma insured that, at some point, it would go to war with someone, the Kaiser's withered arm notwithstanding.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Jan, 2015 06:37 pm
@joefromchicago,
I wasn't implying that Massie's theory was original or on the mark.
Just that I enjoyed the documentary.
No more.
No less.
joefromchicago
 
  2  
Reply Fri 23 Jan, 2015 10:13 pm
@panzade,
panzade wrote:

I wasn't implying that Massie's theory was original or on the mark.
Just that I enjoyed the documentary.
No more.
No less.

Nothing personal, I assure you. I've just heard that "withered arm" theory so often that it gets on my nerves.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2015 12:04 am
@panzade,
I saw last week one only indirectly about Wilhelm II: it was about the Grand Ducal Princess Alix of Hesse and by Rhine, later Tsaritsa Alexandra Feodorovna, and since Saint Alexandra the Passion Bearer.

When you look at her godparents (1872) : The Prince and Princess of Wales, the Russian Tsarevich and Tsarevna, The Princess Beatrice of the United Kingdom, The Duchess of Cambridge, and Princess Anna of Prussia ...

Most interesting in that documentary were photos and films from all those who stayed in Darmstadt castle until 1914.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2015 01:54 am
@Walter Hinteler,
A map showing the Western Front in 1915/16

http://i61.tinypic.com/2a7zho7.jpg

Not much happening there "this" year (brown line).
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  4  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2015 11:20 am
24 JANUARY 1915

NORTH SEA: A German squadron under the commander of Admiral Franz Hipper sorties from its base to attack the British fishing fleet at Dogger Bank. British intercepts of German radio messages, however, reveal Hipper's plans, and a British squadron, led by Admiral David Beatty, sets a trap for the unwary Germans. The two fleets meet at Dogger Bank and, in a confused fight, the British sink the armored cruiser Blücher and seriously damage Hipper's flagship, the battle cruiser Seydlitz. In contrast, British losses are slight - 15 dead and 32 wounded. Despite his losses, Hipper manages to escape after Beatty, fearing a possible U-boat attack, effectively calls off the pursuit.



http://www.worldnavalships.com/images/blucher2.jpg

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1Memoir-SmithGC1915DoggerBank.JPG
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2015 11:44 am
@joefromchicago,
http://i59.tinypic.com/of4osk.jpg

http://i57.tinypic.com/123wtb9.jpg
Oswald von Studnitz, Imperial German Navy. He participated in the naval bombardment of Yarmouth on the English Coast and the engagement at the Dogger Bank in January 1915. Promoted to Commander (Fregattenkapitän) in 1911, in Oct. 1912 became commanding officer of SMS München from October 1912 to February 1915, and was promoted to Captain (Kapitän zur See) in 1914. - When he died in 1963 he was the last surviving full Captain of the Imperial German Navy.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2015 09:19 pm
3 FEBRUARY 1915

MIDDLE EAST: Turkish forces under the direction of German general and military advisor Friedrich Freiherr Kress von Kressenstein launch an attack against British positions along the Suez Canal just south of the Mediterranean entrance near the town of el Kantara. The British, well aware of the Turkish plans courtesy of their aerial reconaissance, repulse the attack with the aid of fire from French and Royal Navy warships stationed in the waterway. A few Turkish troops manage to get across the canal, but they are quickly captured, and the rest of the Ottoman forces retreat in disarray.


This raid marked the last time the Turks were on the offensive in the Palestine front. After their disastrous performance against the Russians in the Caucasus, the Turks would be forced onto the defensive in all theaters in 1915.


http://www.tnnegypt.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/suez.jpg

http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/etexts/WH1-Well/WH1-WellP006a.jpg

0 Replies
 
Harwin3000
 
  5  
Reply Sun 1 Mar, 2015 02:13 pm
Some interesting color photos on World War I

http://www.oldpicz.com/wwi-in-color-part-1/

http://www.oldpicz.com/wwi-in-color-part-2/

http://www.oldpicz.com/wwi-in-color-part-3/
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Mar, 2015 04:51 pm
@Harwin3000,
Thanks. Those are great
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Mar, 2015 05:52 pm
@Harwin3000,
Brilliant photos!
0 Replies
 
 

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