Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Fri 1 Jul, 2016 11:55 am
@panzade,
The Dragon of the Somme from the really interesting (because different) website Great War in Archeology - that's a poignant, highly interactive website exhibiting recent archeological discoveries from the Argonne region in eastern France, where French and German troops engaged in trench warfare during World War I.
(It's a resource about the experiences of WWI soldiers, and also demonstrates the role of archeology in recovering new insights about the past. While everything written is in English [and German and French], some videos are in French only.)
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 02:06 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Thanks Walter. A fascinating site,
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2016 03:35 am
@panzade,
There are hundred if not thousands of sites with sources and document about WWI - from local over regional to just special events.

Europeana 1914-1918, a project based at the University of Oxford, hosts a remarkable collection of primary documents relating to World War I, collected by individuals, libraries, and film archives across Europe.
Hundreds of letters, diaries, photographs, World War I films, official documents, and postcards are to be found there. Each resource type is further sorted by subject (Propaganda, Women, Aerial Warfare, etc.) or front (Italian Front, Home Front, Eastern Front, and Western Front), letting visitors explore the experiences and perspectives of European, American, Australian, and New Zealand soldiers.

Europeana 1914-1918 – untold stories & official histories of WW1
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2016 02:13 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Danke. Some great reading Walter
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2016 03:59 pm
@panzade,
I've been watching FREE WWII movies. Here are WWI movies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CJQNdJT2NI
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2016 11:50 am
Operation War Diary, an ongoing collaborative project between the Imperial War Museum (IWM) and the British National Archives, provides rich information about the experiences of WWI soldiers by examining Unit War Diaries from British and Indian Troops.

The British National Archives has digitized these volumes - over 1.5 million pages, total - and now, in honor of the centenary of the war has collaborated with the IWM.

>diaries<
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2016 01:19 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I visited the Imperial War Museum many decades ago, but still remember many of its content. I even remember the cannon in front of the museum. For some reason, I also remember flags hanging from the ceiling. I'm not sure that's true or not.
0 Replies
 
33export
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Oct, 2016 10:12 pm
Who can say where we would be today ifGavrilo Princip hadn't
been in town when Ferdinand came to visit in 1914 - and changed the world.
Rafan90
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Dec, 2016 11:00 am
@33export,
The war began in any case regardless of whether Gavrilo Princip was in the city or not.
It was not the first attempted murder Ferdinand
0 Replies
 
33export
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Nov, 2017 12:43 pm
In Flanders Fields -
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 9 Mar, 2018 10:35 am
@33export,
The University of North Carolina's Rare Book Collection is home to the Bowman Grey Collection, which features hundreds of "war-themed cards produced in Great Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Russia, and the U.S. during World War One (1914-1918)."
The collection includes postcards that feature war photographs, portraits of military officers, political cartoons, poetry, illustrations, and more. This collection will eventually include over 6,000 postcards.

http://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/graypc
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Wed 30 May, 2018 11:05 am
Reviving this thread:
Britain tried to kill Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1918 with secret RAF bombing raid, reveals archivesExclusive: 'In Germany it might well have turned the increasingly unpopular Kaiser into a martyred war hero and so perhaps even have saved the monarchy from collapse'

Remarkable unpublished evidence has revealed that in the final year of the First World War Britain attempted to kill Germany’s leader, Kaiser Wilhelm II.

The secret mission failed – but only just.

The evidence – largely unpublished documentation in the RAF Museum’s archives and documents in a private archive in France – show that exactly 100 years ago this Saturday, a squadron of 12 bombers took off from an airfield near Boulogne to bomb a French chateau which, intelligence work had revealed, was being used by the Kaiser as his secret Western Front operational residence.

The full story – partly revealed in a new book just published – started in late March 1918 when the German army launched the first of a series of major new offensives against the Allies.

The massive attacks were initially successful – but nevertheless some German soldiers were captured by the Allies. Some of these German PoWs were interrogated by French Intelligence – and one of them revealed to his interrogators that the Kaiser had just taken up residence at a chateau immediately outside a small French village called Trelon, three miles from the Belgian frontier.

By coincidence, one of the intelligence section’s interpreters on the staff of the famous French general, Philippe Pétain, was the owner of that chateau. In mid April 1918 he was given the job of interrogating the German prisoner-of-war in more detail – and, by using local knowledge, to check the veracity of the revelation.

This interrogator (a French officer named Frédéric de Merode) and his commanding officer then went to tell Pétain what they had discovered.

At some stage – probably in May and presumably in conjunction with the British – an "in principle" decision was taken to bomb the chateau. Indeed, De Merode (the chateau owner) was asked by the French military to give them permission to bomb the building. Patriotically, he agreed.

German sources reveal that the Kaiser stayed there on at least three occasions – from 21 March to 2 April; from 5 April to 15 April; from mid May to 1 June and possibly from around 26 April to around 1 May.

It may well be that British intelligence wanted to learn further details before any final political or military green light could be given to try to kill the Kaiser.

After all, they would probably only get one opportunity. If it failed, he would nevertheless realise that the Allies knew exactly where he was living and he would therefore promptly change his Western Front operational residence.

British intelligence officers in Amsterdam in neutral Holland had frequent contact with an underground espionage network in German-occupied Belgium and northern France called La Dame Blanche (The White Lady). It is known that the LDB had agents in the Trelon area – so it is likely that further information on the Kaiser’s movements was passed on (via Amsterdam) to British intelligence HQ in London. However, there was always a time delay – so information was always slightly out of date.

At the same time that the Allies discovered the precise location of the Kaiser (and more importantly realised that he was within bombing range), the German Spring offensive was giving British and French forces a terrible battering. The Germans were succeeding in pushing the Allies back more than 40 miles.

What’s more, in late May, at the battle of Chemin des Dames, the Germans captured 45,000 Allied troops and 400 field guns. For the Allies, it was a catastrophe. At that stage, even in late Spring, 1918, they must have feared that the Germans might even win the war.

So, it was in those dire circumstances that the French and the British appear to have finally decided to try to kill the German emperor.

Having taken off from Ruisseauville Airfield (near Boulogne-sur-Mer) at 4.50am on Sunday 2 June, 12 RAF De Havilland-4 bombers reached the Kaiser’s secret Western Front residence at Trelon at 5:25am. They dropped up to a dozen 50kg bombs and up to 24 11kg ones.

However, unbeknown to British Intelligence, the same German military successes that had probably triggered the bid to kill Kaiser Wilhelm, had also led him to leave the chateau to congratulate his generals at the front. As a result, he had left his Western Front operational residence 19 hours before the RAF struck.

What’s more, the British aircraft chose to attack at an altitude of only 500 feet – and to do so in single file. As a result the smoke from the initial few bombs billowed skywards and prevented many of the succeeding pilots from seeing their target.
[... ... ...]
John Watts, the grandson of one of the RAF airmen involved in the raid, believes that much more information on the raid must still exist in as yet un-studied files in archives in Britain, France and possibly Germany.

“My grandfather’s role was always part of family folklore. The remarkable new details now emerging from sources in northern France and RAF files is at last beginning to reveal what really happened,” said Mr Watts, a West Midlands military history enthusiast.

‘The Kaiser’s Dawn: the untold story of Britain’s secret mission to murder the Kaiser in 1918’ by John Hughes-Wilson (Unicorn Publishing)
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 31 May, 2018 06:10 am
Fascinating stuff. Please don’t let this thread die.
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 31 May, 2018 03:29 pm
Earlier this week was the hundred year anniversary of the first American soldier killed in action on German soil. He was from a town in Michigan and they had some sort of commemorative event that was in the news.

EDIT: I guess this was the guy:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_William_Guyton

I'm glad Wikipedia had it. I'd already forgotten all the details besides that it was a town somewhere in Michigan.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 Jun, 2018 12:51 am
@panzade,
Does anybody remember the book "Johnny Got His Gun"? I read it many years ago but I thought it was about Vietnam.......it wasn't, it was about a man gravely injured during the Great War. For me it was a horrific tale, I gave it to my nephew who was totally blown away by the account. War is awful, War is dehumanizing, War only destroys, everything and the soldiers who are sent out into conflict to be maimed, killed, horribly disfigured or emotionally destroyed. I hope and pray for a responsible government who will make decisions on only the actual threat and not squander the lives and welfare of the men and women who protect us.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Fri 1 Jun, 2018 01:10 am
@glitterbag,
My maternal grandfather was a medic in the Reserve Infantry Regiment 13
Quote:
The 13th Reserve Division fought on the Western Front, participating in the opening German offensive which led to the Allied Great Retreat, including the capture of Maubeuge. Thereafter, the division remained in the line in the Aisne region until December 1915, when it went to the Verdun region. It entered the Battle of Verdun in February, and remained there until September. After the battle, the division remained in the line at Verdun. It went to the Champagne region at the end of 1916, and remained there into 1917, fighting in the Second Battle of the Aisne, also called the Third Battle of Champagne, in April–May 1917. After a few months near Reims, the division returned to the Verdun region in September, remaining there until April 1918 except for a month in Army reserve. The division then went to Belgium, and was in Flanders until the war's end. Allied intelligence rated the division as mediocre in 1917, but first class in 1918.
He was active all the time .... besides three times in hospital due to gas poisonings.

He never talked about that (perhaps, because I was a child when I knew him).
He died of the late effects of these poisonings in 1957.
(I've only found out about that a few years ago, when I looked through papers after my mother's and aunt's deaths.)
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 11:47 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
This could be posted in a couple of other (active) threads, but here is the best place in my opinion:
Europe is at risk of slipping back to 19th-century power games
Quote:
... In fact, we risk sleepwalking back to the geopolitical quagmire of the 19th century.

Back then, the main principle of European relations was the “concert of powers”. The powers calling the shots were Great Britain, Russia, France, Austria-Hungary, Germany (once it was unified in 1871), and the Ottoman empire, despite its dwindling force in the Balkans. Except for Austria-Hungary, which dissolved in 1918, all of these players are restive once more.

Russia pursues 19th-century objectives of territorial aggrandisement, with 20th-century propaganda methods and 21st-century hybrid warfare. Turkey asserts itself as an independent player, breaking ranks with Nato partners and flouting conditions necessary for joining the European Union.
[...]
A return to 19th-century geopolitics would not only weaken the small states, it would also reawaken fundamental instability in the relations between nations. The “concert of powers” – and the smaller states aligned with it – spent huge political and diplomatic energies on a permanent poker game of shifting alliances. When the German emperor Wilhelm II dismissed Otto von Bismarck as prime minister in 1890, he also ended Bismarck’s special treaty arrangements with Russia – previously a defining feature of European relations.
... ... ...
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 07:08 am
That's an interesting analysis, but I don't know that I agree with it. In 1914, Turkey controlled the middle east west of Persia and east of Egypt. The Austro-Hungarian Dual Monarchy not only no longer exists, it's previous component parts are all a part of the above-mentioned group of small nations. Germany does not control as much territory as was the case in 1914, and is not nearly so militaristic--it would take the Germans a generation to come up to speed militarily, and probably against the wishes of the electorate. Despite the moron in the White House, the North Atlantic alliance continues to be a counterbalance to the ambitions of Russia, shaky as it is. (After all, the Russians in spite of all of Putin's bluster are not nearly the military power they truly were in 1914. Looking at each era realistically and in its own context, the Russian army of 1914 was vastly larger, and had much better troops and equipment--it took the concerted efforts of vain, arrogant and incompetent officers abetted by an immense and ineffective, inefficient governmental apparatus to lose their initial campaigns. Russian soldiers at the outset had pretty good morale. I don't think any of those descriptions apply to the Russians of our era, and their military technology has fallen further behind the West with each passing year since 1991.)

I think this is one of those cases of an "expert" taking a dire tone because someone is actually paying attention to what he has to say. I'm unconvinced.
 

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