25
   

Butter nostalgia?

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2014 02:37 pm
@ossobuco,
Actually the best way here to get your meat and beef is to buy it at farm butcher's. (You can choose on the living object ... some days be Wink )
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2014 02:50 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
That sounds very good to me. Alas, the same can't happen everywhere.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2014 02:55 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:

There are a number of Whole Animal restaurants around. I read about those in my food reading re NYC, LA, SF; haven't read about Chicago lately, but there's a history there, re the stockyards. Dunno what those restaurant sources are, but they might be interesting. I don't know if that is a trend around the country.


it is a bit of a fad, they call it " snout to tail" dining. This is more the exception proves the rule however, this is a thing because it is so strange.

Edit: I was talking with chef Bruce Naftaly formerly at his place Le Gourmand, he said that he did it once and decided never again....it was a lot of work that he was not used to, and was not particularly good at. This is a very highly regarded chef who has been in the biz since the early 70's..."the father of northwest cooking" they call him. I figure snout to tail will not stick around long, most chefs already work 60+ hours a week.
spikepipsqueak
 
  2  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 04:04 am
@hawkeye10,
I've just spent a short stint as a cook on a cattle station.

They kill an animal and you adjust your menu according to what's available, until the whole beast is gone.

Is that what you mean by the whole animal concept?

It shouldn't make more work for the chef though it prevents them from presenting mass produced meals.

About butter. This thread prompted me to buy some and risk a little pain. I can confirm that butter is blander than it was when I was a kid, since I haven't had much of it in between, to get gradually used to the change.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 04:21 am
Then again, all those years could well mean that your recollection of the taste is faulty. The only reason that i would consider it reliable is that in the 1950s, dairy cattle were so commonly grazed that milk tasted different in the spring when they were switched from stored fodder to the new grass. But i can't claim to, and don't claim to remember what it tasted like.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 06:29 am
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
I figure snout to tail will not stick around long, most chefs already work 60+ hours a week.


it's been around as a 'trend' for about 15 years in Toronto now
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 10:53 am
@boomerang,
Cabot's is from Vermont (they have cheeses as well) and Kate's is from Maine - so maybe it is only sold in New England?
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 10:57 am
@ossobuco,
Our local butcher (well two towns over) has a thriving business. Granted they have a small parking lot, but you need to wait to get a parking space. I cannot imagine them be run out of business == and there is a trader joes and a whole foods not far away.

Just a huge difference and yes you can get your meat cut special for you - they also have it pre-cut, but often times I will order a huge prime rib and they will cut as a want (into ribeyes and a small roast usually) and pack it well for freezing.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 10:57 am
@Linkat,
I've seen Cabot's somewhere - probably back when I lived in California.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 11:15 am
@Linkat,
I've been in local supermarkets all over the East Coast and I can find Cabot's in almost every one I've visited.

According to Cabot Creamery website, I see that Cabot cheeses are available in NM. I saw listed Albuquerque listed in Costco, Sams Club and Trader Joes..etc.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 12:18 pm
@Ragman,
Aha and thanks. None of those near enough for me at this point, which explains why I haven't noticed Cabot's.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 May, 2014 01:06 pm
I tried to see where kate's butter is sold - and found this:

"Our whole team is thrilled to announce Kate's
has earned its second "First Place" prize from the annual
World Dairy Expo Championship, held in Wisconsin. At the 2008
championship event held in late September, Kate's was presented with
top honors in the "unsalted butter" category, having earned a rare score
of 98.8 out of a possible 100 points. The First Place prize for our unsalted
butter comes just two years after Kate's earned the First Place slot for our
sea salt butter version at the 2006 Expo."

and an exerpt from an article...

"Kate's is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, without much fanfare. I was the first journalist allowed into their production facility in 23 years. The Patry family has refused a lot of interview requests, and stopped giving tours a long time ago, mostly because of concern about contamination. Even a splash of perfume worn by a visitor could ruin a batch of butter.

The family also just plain doesn't like a lot of attention. Their production facility is located in the garage of a modest home on a side street. Occasionally, fans of Kate's Homemade Butter will track them down in this seaside town and suddenly appear on their doorstep, hoping to view the operation and buy some butter. They are always turned away.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jun, 2014 08:34 pm
Quote:
Flavor

Flavor is usually a subjective determination. What tastes better is entirely a matter of personal opinion, right? Not in the case of butter. Grass-fed butter tastes objectively better using any parameter. Creaminess? Smooth, yellow grass-fed butter can be eaten and enjoyed like candy. Richness? Grain-fed is weak and insipid in comparison. Mouth feel? Grass-fed coats the interior (in a pleasant way), while grain-fed comes off as watery and unnatural.



Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/grass-fed-butter/#ixzz340hqeHgs


Turns out that almost all American dairy milk is from grain feed Holsteins. Grass fed Guernsey's are prob the best American alternative for butter.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jun, 2014 08:51 pm
@hawkeye10,
Around 1990 I remember getting to Germany and thinking that Lurpak butter was way better than American butter.

Danmark herd composition

Quote:
Holstein is the predominant dairy breed – 72 per cent
Holstein; 12 per cent Jersey; 8 per cent Danish Red; 1 per cent Red Holstein; 7 per cent
crossbreds. T

http://www.whff.info/info/conferences/ehc2007/02%20Farming%20and%20milk%20production%20in%20Denmark.pdf

The American herd is 90 Holstein, and it appears that most of the other 10% are in smaller operations. This needs looking into, it could be that commercial butter is close to 100% holstein, which might be the problem re flavor.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jun, 2014 09:11 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Black and white Holstein cows make up over 90% of the U.S. dairy herd. Some Holsteins are red and white, but, aside from color, indistinguishable from black and white Holsteins. The U.S. Holstein is well known around the world for her ability to produce large volumes of milk, butterfat and protein. She is a very profitable cow for farmers when large amounts of feed with high levels of grain are available. The U.S. Holstein is relatively new to North America, with the first imports of registered Holsteins arriving in the 1880s. However, the breed has dominated production in the U.S. since the end of World War II, and advances in artificial insemination have increased her popularity in breeding programs around the world largely owing to her advantage in production over all other breed

The Jersey is the second most popular cow in the U.S. and makes up about 7% of the U.S. dairy herd. She is known for her smaller size (1000 lbs. for a mature Jersey cow versus 1500 lbs. for a mature Holstein cow), higher percentages of fat and protein in her milk, early maturity, and efficiency of milk production. Payment by milk processors to dairy producers based on the content of butterfat and protein in milk has increased the popularity of the Jersey, especially in markets where milk is manufactured into cheese. Other dairy breeds make up only around 2% of the dairy cattle population. These include:

Ayrshires - moderately large cows that are red and white to mahogany and white and are known for producing milk that is quite rich in butterfat and for the conformation of their udders;
Brown Swiss - large brown cattle that are known for their docile manner, high milk protein to milk fat ratio, sound feet and legs, and purported resistance to heat stress in hot and humid regions;
Guernseys - red and white to mostly red and are somewhat larger than Jerseys and are known for the yellow color of the butterfat in their milk, which is rich in Beta-Carotene; and
Milking Shorthorns - a rugged breed of cattle that are red and white to mostly red, mostly white, or roan (speckled) and are known for milk that is well suited for cheese production and for their grazing ability


http://www.epa.gov/oecaagct/ag101/printdairy.html

Well this is a clue, it looks like in markets where little cheese is made we can expect all Holsteins, as the cheesemakers are the one who will most likely pay the extra for the better milk from the Jerseys.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Jun, 2014 09:47 pm
@hawkeye10,
A study that shows in great detail why the American Dairy herd is almost all Holstein

http://dairy.ifas.ufl.edu/rns/2013/13_rodriguez.pdf
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jun, 2014 10:02 pm
@hawkeye10,
On the "grocery ethics" thread I was talking about the milk that Mo has become addicted to. I was looking at their label and it says the milk comes from "French heritage breeds" (and a lot of other specifics about how their raised and what they eat) but I haven't had a chance to investigate what French heritage breeds are (and why their milk would cost $15 a gallon).

It's a Washington dairy, Hawkeye -- Flying Cow. Here's a link to their site discussing milk -- it seems to be written for the dairy aficionados: http://flyingcowcreamery.com/Parent%20pages/High%20Quality%20Milk.htm

0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jun, 2014 10:07 pm
Found it -- they're mostly Holsteins:

Quote:
The majority of Keith's cows are Holsteins. As Keith transitions into more and more grass based farming, he has crossbred some of his cows with the Guernsey breed. The Guernsey is a breed that is thought to do better in strictly grass based farming, plus it's milk has higher butter fat. The Guernsey is not a perfect breed, by any means. It is known for conception difficulties. Keith hopes that crossbreeding will bring out the best of both breeds. It takes years of experimenting with crossbreeding to find the perfect match, which may never show itself. The first crossbred cow, Yoga (in the picture above being scratched by Selma), will freshen (give birth and start giving milk) in the spring of 2013.


More: http://flyingcowcreamery.com/Parent%20pages/The%20Ladies.htm
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Jun, 2014 10:50 pm
@boomerang,
You notice that he wants to cut down the percentage of Holsteins....
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Jun, 2014 10:52 pm
@hawkeye10,
this site says that the french are slightly below 70% holsteins...

http://www.terresdeurope.net/en/french-dairy-cows-beef.asp

Because I like Lurpak so much, and they feed almost no grass, I am going with the idea that grass can be better, that cultured cream is probably better than sweet cream butter for bread, but that the major problem with American Butter is that we have way too many Holsteins, because we have done that all american trade of quality for cheap . We should have about 70%, we have 90%.
 

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