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Biggest stack in Southern Hemisphere is coming down

 
 
Wilso
 
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:19 pm
http://i57.tinypic.com/2e3q590.jpg

It's become something of an icon in Wollongong, standing since 1965, visible all up and down the coast. Sure there will be plenty of YouTube videos of it. Will be quite a sight.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 15 • Views: 3,393 • Replies: 54

 
Setanta
 
  4  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:33 pm
@Wilso,
This is what comes of driving on the wrong side of the road.
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:43 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

This is what comes of driving on the wrong side of the road.


I understand that the British were keeping left - before the US even existed! Now, I'm no fan of the POMS but some traditions are worth keeping.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:45 pm
I looked it up, lot of pollution apparently involved per wiki.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Kembla,_New_South_Wales

I can see it having been a landmark, icon of sorts.
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:46 pm
Surely a history expert like yourself would know if this is true or not.
Quote:


In the Middle Ages you kept to the left for the simple reason that you never knew who you'd meet on the road in those days. You wanted to make sure that a stranger passed on the right so you could go for your sword in case he proved unfriendly.

This custom was given official sanction in 1300 AD, when Pope Boniface VIII invented the modern science of traffic control by declaring that pilgrims headed to Rome should keep left.

The papal system prevailed until the late 1700s, when teamsters in the United States and France began hauling farm products in big wagons pulled by several pairs of horses. These wagons had no driver's seat. Instead the driver sat on the left rear horse, so he could keep his right arm free to lash the team. Since you were sitting on the left, naturally you wanted everybody to pass on the left so you could look down and make sure you kept clear of the other guy's wheels. Ergo, you kept to the right side of the road. The first known keep-right law in the U.S. was enacted in Pennsylvania in 1792, and in the ensuing years many states and Canadian provinces followed suit.

In France the keep-right custom was established in much the same way. An added impetus was that, this being the era of the French Revolution and all, people figured, hey, no pope gonna tell ME what to do. (See above.) Later Napoleon enforced the keep-right rule in all countries occupied by his armies. The custom endured even after the empire was destroyed.

In small-is-beautiful England, though, they didn't use monster wagons that required the driver to ride a horse. Instead the guy sat on a seat mounted on the wagon. What's more, he usually sat on the right side of the seat so the whip wouldn't hang up on the load behind him when he flogged the horses. (Then as now, most people did their flogging right-handed.) So the English continued to drive on the left, not realizing that the tide of history was running against them and they would wind up being ridiculed by folks like you with no appreciation of life's little ironies. Keeping left first entered English law in 1756, with the enactment of an ordinance governing traffic on the London Bridge, and ultimately became the rule throughout the British Empire.


Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:48 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:

I looked it up, lot of pollution apparently involved per wiki.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Kembla,_New_South_Wales

I can see it having been a landmark, icon of sorts.


There were pollution concerns when the plant was running yes. Particularly in later years. It's original purpose was to put the pollution higher, so that it would go further away! Ahh, the good old days.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:53 pm
@Wilso,
Could be true, i make no claims about it. I had read that a long time ago, but i just like to taunt you and the POMs with driving on the wrong side of the road and misspelling words. Keeps things lively . . .
Wilso
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:55 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

and misspelling words. Keeps things lively . . .


An American talking about English spelling. This could get ugly. Laughing
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 04:57 pm
Ok, I'll concede that US spelling generally makes more sense, but I'm a bit of a purist when it comes to English spelling, even given that I'm not educated on the subject.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:02 pm
@Wilso,
I went on a school excursion to Kembla when it was operating. I still remember the sea pool next to the smelter with the black water. The tour guy didn't like us punkass kids pointing out the pollution.
Wilso
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:04 pm
@hingehead,
hingehead wrote:

I went on a school excursion to Kembla when it was operating. I still remember the sea pool next to the smelter with the black water. The tour guy didn't like us punkass kids pointing out the pollution.


I went to pre-school literally in the shadow of that stack, and then worked in the neighbouring steel industry for almost 29 years.
Wilso
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:06 pm
The copper smelter was bad. Environmentally better for the city that it's gone.
hingehead
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:08 pm
@Wilso,
Ha - the stack is on twitter

https://twitter.com/PortStack

Better follow it quick before it dies!
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:18 pm
@Wilso,
Other aspects of minor historical significance can be interesting. The Japanese also drive on the wrong side of the road. When the western powers forced Japan to open their ports, they granted concessions at Yokohama to two western powers, GB and France. They resented the Americans, and so did not grant them a concession. During the 1868-69 war which ended the Tokugawa shogunate, the French allied themselves with Tokugawa Yoshinobu, and the Brits stood aside. When the Tokugawa shogunate ended and the Meiji emperor's government took over, the Brits became Japan's western ally by default, on a "last man standing" basis. So, they drive on the wrong side of the road, and the transliteration of their language into Roman characters is rather easy for English-speakers to read.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:20 pm
@Wilso,
We owe our sensible system to Noah Webster, who built an ark and wrote a primer for school children, including what he considered rational spelling. I find it interesting that Brits will complain about our spelling, and yet they have adopted some of Mr. Webster's changes. For example, they no longer write magick or tragick. It's all in a day's pettiness.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:34 pm
Our copper smelter smokestack here in the a-hole o' Texas went down last April.

http://i1020.photobucket.com/albums/af324/infrablu/asarcosmokestackdemolition04-13-20131_zps3e2062ff.jpg

http://i1020.photobucket.com/albums/af324/infrablu/asarcosmokestackdemolition04-13-20132_zps4882e6f0.jpg


The plant was built right on the banks of the Rio Grande, the border between the US and Mexico here. In the background in the upper left of the photo one can see the river. Mexico is on the other side.

http://i1020.photobucket.com/albums/af324/infrablu/asarcosmokestackdemolition04-13-20133_zpsc0259ac2.jpg

http://i1020.photobucket.com/albums/af324/infrablu/asarcosmokestackdemolition04-13-20134_zps4bbb2afc.jpg
roger
 
  3  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:49 pm
@InfraBlue,
Geez, couldn't they have waited till it finished its last smoke.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:53 pm
@Wilso,
I'm dyed in wool american but I like some english spellings better - travellers, for example. Usually spell it with one 'l' but sometimes rebel.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:57 pm
@Wilso,
Huh, how are your lungs? None of my business, of course. I lived a long time not far from sooty diesel using buses (you could see it on the top of our fence), and worked and did art with varies bad fluids abounding (kerosene to wash off copper etching plates.. no gloves, my lady), so I'm not claiming any kind of non toxic lifestyle. Not to mention smoking like a chimney myself for twenty years.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2014 05:58 pm
The word that describes words being spelled as they sound - phonetic!
0 Replies
 
 

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