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Architects plan 34-Storey wooden skyscraper in Sweden

 
 
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 02:42 pm
Architects hope to build the world 's largest wooden skyscraper in Stockholm, Sweden, and claim that the skyscraper is "cheaper, easier and more sustainable than typical steel and concrete constructions".

http://designbuildsource.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/34-storey-wooden-skyscraper.jpg

http://designbuildsource.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/34-storey-wooden-skyscraper-1.jpg

Quote:
Sweden is hitting new heights in the wooden skyscraper trend with a 34-storey wood building proposed for Stockholm.

The design was created for HSB Stockholm’s architectural competition 2023, an initiative that marks the organisation’s 100 years as Sweden’s largest building society, and to celebrate an “ultra-modern residential high-rise building” will be built in the city.
The skyscraper was designed through a collaboration between Berg | C.F. Møller Architects, Dinell Johansson and Tyréns, who are competing with two other architecture teams made up of Equator Stockholm with Mojang (Minecraft) and Utopia Architects with Rosenberg Architects.

Simply called HSB 2.0, the designers aim for the structure to be what Berg | C.F. Møller calls “a new and characteristic beacon and meeting place in their city.”

Solid wood will be the predominant material in the building’s pillars and beams, while inside, walls, ceilings, fittings and window frames will be also constructed of wood.

Sustainable and green initiatives have been implemented into HSB 2.0 through the installation of solar panels on the roof to power the building. Each apartment will have an energy saving and glass-covered verandah. A communal winter garden that allocates allotment gardens for residents is being implemented and vertical greenery will be used throughout the structure.

Shared amenities include a new community centre, a market square, fitness centre and bicycle storage room. To save space, there is no large lobby, with the building simply featuring an elevator to get residents to their floors.

Skyscrapers have come a long way since 1885, when the first steel skyscraper, the 10-storey Home Insurance Building in Chicago was built with steel and concrete as primary structural materials.

Wood has been experimented with over the past few years and wooden skyscrapers have begun to rise since the first nine-storey wooden structure was built in London in 2009.

Sweden is already home to a seven-floor wooden building while Melbourne currently has the tallest wooden residential building in the world, the 10-storey Forte Apartments created from cross-laminated timber.
Source
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 02:54 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I hope no wood is exposed to the weather, especially those glue lam beams. They will spread and expand like popcorn is they get wet.

Show me any wooden structures that survive so as to be archeological artifacts (other than the roof posts at canyon de chelley
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 02:56 pm
I know when metal starts to go, it goes. Wood can be more resilient and retain its strength. In both cases it all comes down to planning and execution. I want to see this building get finished.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 03:02 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Beside questions of whether wood have the strength to weight ratio to deal with such a structure not only when it new but as it age one concern is fire in such a tall wooden building.

At one time long wooden railroad bridges was common however their life times was short, the amount of needed constant care was large and not a few burned down.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 03:12 pm
Quote:
Architects say that while wood would be typically regarded as being a potential fire hazard, it's properties mean that it is not necessarily a fire hazard.
This is because wood mass is made up of 15 per cent water, which will evaporate before the wood actually burns in a fire situation.
And although wood may seem like a delicate substance from which to build a soaring skyscraper, the architects claim that while it is lightweight, it can bear heavy loads.
It is not the first time Sweden has out wood to good use - the country is already home to a seven-floor wooden building.

Source


Architects' website
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 03:26 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

I hope no wood is exposed to the weather,

I'm pretty sure that they protect steel I-beams from the elements, too.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 03:40 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
Architects say that while wood would be typically regarded as being a potential fire hazard, it's properties mean that it is not necessarily a fire hazard.
This is because wood mass is made up of 15 per cent water, which will evaporate before the wood actually burns in a fire situation.



Strange as wooden bridges even those over water had been known to burn down to the water level.

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRi0q7zbcSY2YgquAbGeKPNbJW4OULQb98kVDJ4kR39YlYFV3nqNg

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 04:02 pm
@BillRM,
and metal covered ships can burn spectacularly
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 04:28 pm
When you do get a fire in a concrete and steel structure, both materials loose strength very quickly.
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 04:36 pm
@roger,
Quote:
When you do get a fire in a concrete and steel structure, both materials loose strength very quickly.


True but they of themselves are not fuel for a fire and wooden beams etc surely are.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 07:33 am
Yep, I'd be worried about a fire, too. Our house caught fire back when I was 8 yrs old and it didn't take long for it to become a raging conflagration.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 08:16 am
@Mame,
If a house gets on fire, it doesn't matter whether it's built from concrete, clay, wood or ...

Fire insurance for a modern wooden house is slightly less here than for a comparable stone house.

In Scandinavia, wooden houses are in the majority ... but not with skyscrapers. Wink
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 12:20 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Sorry but wood homes if done right and not cheaply and maintain is fine but the idea of large wood structures such as a 34 wooden skyscraper is insane.

No fire that was not feed by very large swimming pools worth of jet fuel would had brought down the world trade center towers even with the planes cause damages and the one secondary steel building that came down was cause by a large oil tank under pressure design to feed large backup generators.

However you do not need fuel feed fires to destroy a wooden structure by fire.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 12:45 pm
@BillRM,
Speaking of houses, as Walter does, insurance companies are very seldom wrong in the long run. I would worry about anything with more than one or two floors, though.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 01:03 pm
@BillRM,
From the above given links:
Quote:
Another benefit to using wood is that it can be treated so that it has increased fire resistance compared to steel or concrete.


BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 02:23 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
has increased fire resistance compared to steel or concrete.


And steel beams and supports can be protection with fire insulation materials and another factor in why the twin towers fail is that the planes impact removed a large amount of the insulation on the twin towers metal support structures and then the heat of the ten of thousands of gallons of burning jet fuel did the rest. I question if without all that fuel any likely fire would have reach the temperature needed to cause the collapse of those building even with the damage done by yhe planes.

In any case I myself would not care to live in a wooden skyscraper but to each his own.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 02:29 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:
In any case I myself would not care to live in a wooden skyscraper but to each his own.

FTFY
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 02:30 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
http://designbuildsource.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/34-storey-wooden-skyscraper.jpg

Jenga!

http://files.doobybrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/giant-jenga.jpg
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 06:40 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
The vast majority of houses are made with wood in canada. It's way cheaper to build a wood house. At least you can jump out of a window, and 50% of the time we'd hit snow. Wink
I've read several articles on this highrise and not one article mentions fire. You couldn't pay me to live in this building.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 06:54 pm
@Ceili,
You couldn't pay me to live in any skyscraper. Or work in one, and that's a long time lack of interest. I did live in a building on the sixth floor when I was eight, and in retrospect that felt safe, elevator and stairs right there. Then, though, it was just fun, I liked my school across the street, I liked a friend in the building, I like like liked New York city, all those big ocean liners and great stores like the biggest dimestore in the world...

I do like wood houses, california bungalows of a certain age in particular.

0 Replies
 
 

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