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Architects plan 34-Storey wooden skyscraper in Sweden

 
 
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 09:40 pm
@farmerman,
http://www.porterescapes.com/Content/Images/destinations/StJohns/slideshow/big/St_johns_getaways_st_johns.jpg
St. John's, NL
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 09:47 pm
@Rockhead,
My house is made of Toronto brick.

I grew up in the Limestone City.

I've always lived near the edge of the Canadian Shield (or on the shield) - it's all about stunted trees and lots of rocks and brick clay.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 09:55 pm
@ehBeth,
I'll trade you wood for rock, 3 to 1...

I'm starting to make fake rocks they are so scarce.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 10:27 pm
@Rockhead,
Substantive posting as you've laid claim to.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 10:30 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
trolling is less attractive in you than ignoring was...
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 10:34 pm
@Rockhead,
Snarky
Rockhead
 
  0  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 10:39 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
you're trashing a thread to prove your point.

are you there yet???
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2013 10:42 pm
@Rockhead,
Point proven though
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Jun, 2013 12:01 am
@Rockhead,
Brick became a standard in the mid Atlantic states in the colonial period. Bulk material like timber was transported to England. They sent us lots of bricks and London anvils because they needed ballast for their ships. The brick tradition didn't make it to Kansas mostly because wasn't that big a timber producer. Also, not many good harbors.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 22 Jun, 2013 12:01 am
Larger office houses have already been built - like this 8-storey office tower in Dornbirn/Austria

http://i41.tinypic.com/2qunrxx.jpg

The projects (and houses) of some Berlin architects got a better review re fire by the Berlin fire-brigade than comparable other houses: they resist fire up to one hour. (Until 2010, wooden houses in Berlin weren't allowed to be higher than 5 storeys.)
Here's the model of a senior's http://i44.tinypic.com/19w8x4.jpgcare home, whic just now is being built
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Sat 22 Jun, 2013 12:05 am
@roger,
there is no such thing as a native pine tree here...

I'm studying adobe at the moment.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 22 Jun, 2013 12:13 am
@roger,
the brick ballast story is a bit of a chestnut. WHile there were several hundred loads of brick for ballast on old precolonial ships, brickmaking and pottery was one of the first endeavors to go big time in the colonies. The great deposits of the Columbia and Potomac clay pits were used for pottery and , mixed with sand, became where most of the "salmon" bricks from which the cities of Philly, Boston, and New York were built. There weren't enough ships with ballast that could meet the demands of all the building going up in the colonies.
many homes in the deep wilderness were built of bricks that were dug, molded and baked right on the site of the building. The Dickinson mansion in Dover Delaware (john Dickinson the "penman of the Revolution") was built as a small brick cabin by Dickinsons father. That humble house was built using high fire British ballast brick. The largere segment of the Dickinson mansion was completed by making bricks right on site, and one can see the tone difference between the ballast brick and the later salmon brick (which had to be painted with a varnish sealer to prevent the bricks from washing apart. High fire brick wasn't really made in big batches until coal became available in the late late 1790's

0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Jun, 2013 11:43 am
This project is reported on WIRED today, too.(With a lot of links.)
Quote:
[...]As part of a residential design competition, C.F. Møller partnered with architect Dinell Johansson and urban consultant Tyréns to design a massive wood structure that, if chosen, will be built by 2023. C.F. Møller’s design is among the tallest timber-framed building plans out there. It would tower over Murray Grove, the nine-story residential building in London, and it beats out Michael Green’s proposed 30-story woodscraper in Vancouver as well as Michael Charter’s Big Wood, a prototype for a timber-based building in Chicago’s South Loop.[...]
0 Replies
 
 

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