Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2004 05:38 pm
Just back from La Belle Provence (Quebec) where delicious poutine is offered in abundance at ski chalets and fast food outlets....(Poutine is calorie-laden french fries liberally slathered with gravy and cheese.....)

What inventive and delicious dishes are you familiar with using the humble potato?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 3,076 • Replies: 21
No top replies

 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2004 05:44 pm
I shall return...
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2004 05:49 pm
Me too, shepaints. I LOVE potatoes! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2004 07:33 pm
see, when you say poutine, the word delicious would not first come to my mind. I would first think of words like 'spackle-like" or cementitious.

froggy fries shhould be surved with CIDER VINEGAR. and a little salt.

Poutine is the sound you make when you eat some of that stuff. very apro po

wasabee mashed taters

potato slices covered with olive oil and covered with lipton dried onion soup and baked in an oven

german pot salad

homes frittes

sweet tater pie
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2004 07:38 pm
I remember my first taste of poutine. I was billeting with a totally francophone family who lived in Chicoutimi, Quebec. They thought I listen to country music and rode a horse, being from way out west and all. Anyway, Canada day we went to Quebec city, after the fire works, a couple of glasses of wine - the family and I began singing O Canada in two languages at the top of our lungs, in front of the Chateau Frontenac, listening to the song echo over the St. Lawrence and the gorging on poutine as we walked along La plain d'abraham laughing. Thanks for stirring up the memories.

BTW - Poutine, if I'm not wrong is THE most fattening food in the world. Heartattackinabowl!
Yummm
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2004 08:24 pm
I adore potatoes, but ain't got no recipes. Although I have one or two I think from my old sweet potato fritters thread, on another forum. Finally got a recipe for that from the source, trouble is, it'll feed 60 people.

I've taken to roasting cleaned sliced or chunked and dribbled with olive oiled red potatoes mixed with some sliced sweet potatoe in a 350 oven. (Don't peel). Add sage leaves toward the end, which you get to recognize, after tossing them so they brown on different sides. Do this, preferably, in a teflon pan... or perhaps a cast iron fry pan. I tend to add whole garlic bulbs... or some portions thereof, if it is just regular potatoes.

Gee, you can elaborate... I suppose caraway would be good, or cumin, or....

And, I'm picky, I like fresh potatoes, or relatively fresh.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2004 08:32 pm
Then there's potato salad. Made one once with boiled red potatoes, boiled purple ones (a couple), taken out of water au point, cooled, sliced, mixed with some pungent olive chunks, some chunks of slightly sauteed sweet red pepper, or not sauteed, a bunch of capers, and a good slightly mustardy vinegrette. Or one could go towards anchovy... (though lotsa folk hate 'em if they find out.)
0 Replies
 
shepaints
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 10:17 pm
Lovely memories Ceili....Sub-zero weather makes poutine very appealing, especially after a 15K cross country ski trail! ( A digression...the park had bird seed available for skiiers to give to birds at wooden feeders along the route. Deer actually
crossed my path on the last day...sheer heaven!)

I know Oprah had a recipe for low fat fries.....wish
I could find a low fat poutine sauce....!!!

Gotta try some of your ideas Farmerman....Somewhere I have a
divine recipe for chocolate cake using mashed pototoes!
0 Replies
 
kev
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Mar, 2004 09:16 pm
Re: Potatoes
shepaints wrote:


What inventive and delicious dishes are you familiar with using the humble potato?


There is nothing humble about the potato, it's the most versatile vegetable there is, god bless it.

http://foodgeeks.com/recipes/type.phtml?cat_id=16&subcat_id=2&type_id=16
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Mar, 2004 10:05 pm
I'm all for frites with brown gravy, but you can keep the curds . . . when i eat poutine, i either eat all the curds first, or just pick them off . . .
0 Replies
 
shepaints
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Mar, 2004 10:13 pm
I stand corrected Kev and will put the potato on
a pedestal immediately........Thank you for the veritable treasure trove of recipes. God bless you!!!!...

Setanta....no changes to poutine for me!
0 Replies
 
tombutton
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 06:54 am
A site for potato lovers everywhere
Check out the following webpage:

Potato Fan Club
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 07:03 am
Incidentally, a medium baked potato contains more potassium than a banana, with a fraction of the sugar. Well, all starch converts to sugar in the body, but if, for example, you are diabetic, the potato will serve you better, as it won't cause blood-sugar spikes like some very sweet fruits can.
0 Replies
 
kitchenpete
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 07:05 am
I should look for a recipe, as you've reminded me of the Savoyarde (Alpine region crossing France-Switzerland) speciality: Tartiflette.

I'll come back when I've found one...again, you gain a pound per forkfull!
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 07:31 am
farmerman, does that German pot salad come from the highlands of the country? Just curious.

For anyone who may pop in here without a knowledge of French, ossobuco used the term "au point". This is just froggy for "when they're done...no, not that done idiot apprentice!" Amazing how they can compress words, those French.

A couple of my favourite Frenchie potato recipes are Pommes Anna, consisting of very thinly sliced potatoes tossed with melted butter, good sea salt, a bit of white pepper, layered in a parchment-lined frying pan, covered and baked until done. When it's chilled, you flip it out, and if you did it right, it should be browned nicely. Cut into wedges and reheat either in the oven or microwave. Simple and delicious. The second is Pommes Duchesse, basically mashed potato enriched with egg yolks, butter and cream, and piped into fancy shapes or borders and baked until golden.
0 Replies
 
shepaints
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 07:48 pm
Cav.....Pommes Anna sound wonderfully delicious.....by the way.....is "au point" the same
as "al dente?"

I have a wonderful...."Good Morning, Warm
Potato Salad" that I must post here.....warm
potatoes, cream, baked apple slices, bacon and
poppy seed on a bed of lettuce"........
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 07:55 pm
Al dente means to the tooth, and is interpreted differently by various people. In Liguria, the pasta is, apparently, especially toothy. My friend's husband is from a ligurian family and she always pulls her pasta faster than I, as does a new restaurant in my town. I only disagree by a hair in any case. Her's is closer to mine, with the new restaurant's pasta being almost cold... coming out of the roiling boiling water, I mean.

In practice, I would think (I am not a chef, by a long shot) au point means RIGHT NOW TAKE IT OUT SO IT DOESN'T OVERCOOK, whatever point that may be... maybe earlier or later than al dente. I'd think they mean the same, usually, except maybe you want things cooked even less, at some point... the point being the consideration.

OK, cheffies, straighten me out here..
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 08:48 pm
Al dente is sadly interpereted by many restaurants as "undercooked". As with vegetables cooked "au point", there is a point when pasta is cooked, but still firm. However, too toothy too not cooked enough.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 08:53 pm
Love the 'homes frittes', farmerman.

I'll take them anyway except potatos au rottin'.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 09:30 pm
Has anybody else tried a pasta (available I would guess at little stores oriented to italian imports) by a company, Rustichella d'Abruzzo? Very expensive, at $4.75 a pound.
On the other hand, it is a league above usual... really really good pasta. In my present opinion.


edit to apologize for the nonpotato comment...
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Quiznos - Discussion by cjhsa
Should We Eat Our American Neighbours? - Question by mark noble
Favorite Italian Food? - Discussion by cjhsa
The Last Thing You Put In Your Mouth.... - Discussion by Dorothy Parker
Dessert suggestions, please? - Discussion by msolga
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Potatoes
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/28/2021 at 08:41:27