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`I lerne Deutsch aber es ist noch nicht super`

 
 
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 01:31 pm
Hello,

In the sentence below, should I use `es` or something else to refer to `Deutsch`?

`I lerne Deutsch aber es ist noch nicht super`
`I lerne Deutsch aber das ist noch nicht super`

For example, in the sentence below `it` refers to my German knowledge.

`I have been learning German, but it (my German) is not perfect yet.`

Which pronoun should I use to refer to my German knowledge when constructing the sentence right above in German?

Please let me know if my question is vague, so that I can clear it up.

Many thanks
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 2,505 • Replies: 13
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helmi15
 
  2  
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 02:03 pm
Hi.

Ich lerne Deutsch, aber es ist noch nicht gut.

This would be the way I would write this sentence. Es is a possesive pronoun. In this case you could substitute. Das is not a possesive pronoun.

Ich lerne Deutsch, aber mein Deutsch (my German) ist noch nicht gut.

I would use gut instead of super. Super would mean that your German is not yet superior.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 05:11 pm
@cicibebe,
Cic there's a trans facility in Google

By the way "I" s/b "Ich" shouldn't it
cicibebe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 06:00 pm
@dalehileman,
Yeah I've forgotten that. I apologize for it
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 06:10 pm
@cicibebe,
Not at all Cic. I wasn't sure but what it was a 21st-century neologism
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 10:40 pm
@cicibebe,
"Es" and "das" are both correct. For what it's worth, "es" sounds more idiomatic to my native-German ears.
helmi15
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 08:50 am
@Thomas,
Do you really think das is correct in this case?
I have never heard someone using das in such a sentence.

According to the German Wikipedia personal pronouns (I was wrong with the possesive pronoun) are used when a noun is replaced.
Additionally if das stands alone in a sentence it can be replaced by welches or dieses (two demonstratives). To me the sentence does not sound right after such a substitution, but perhaps it is also ok.
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:00 am
@Thomas,
Really? It doesn't sound right at all to my ears (although I acknowledge your ears are much better than mine in this particular area). Wouldn't "Ich lerne Deutsch aber es ist noch nicht gut" suggest that the German language isn't good yet? Seems to me that "es" has an unclear antecedent. I'd go with something like "Ich studiere Deutsch, aber mein Studium geht mir langsam (oder schlecht)."
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:14 am
@helmi15,
helmi15 wrote:
Do you really think das is correct in this case?
I have never heard someone using das in such a sentence.

I agree "das" sounds a little off, but it does not violate any rule of German grammar I'm aware of. The same is true if you substitute "das" with "dieses", as you suggest you should be able to. While it sounds like a clueless, tone-deaf, or insecure person trying to be formal, it technically violates no grammatical rule and does convey the intended meaning.
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:26 am
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:
Seems to me that "es" has an unclear antecedent.

"Es" would be understood to refer to "the German I've learned so far", or something in that vein. So yes, the antecedent is kind of vague, but it remains well within the limits of vagueness permissible in everyday conversation.

joefromchicago wrote:
I'd go with something like "Ich studiere Deutsch, aber mein Studium geht mir langsam (oder schlecht)."

"Geht mir zu langsam" (too slow) or just "langsam" without the "mir". But yes, that would be more precise.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:37 am
@Thomas,
I wouldn't write that sentence in a paper when studying German at the LMU's Faculty of Languages and Literatures. But I agree with Thomas, it's every day German. (And joe's sentence is more precise.)
0 Replies
 
helmi15
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:43 am
@Thomas,
Yes, you might be right. I am not an expert in German grammar, but as a native speaker it sounded wrong to me.

Some additional thoughts:
In this case "das" would be a demonstrative pronoun I think, which refers to the object "Deutsch". So if you use "das" it should be accented.
I guess in this case one could say that the German language is not good.

If you use "es", this word can be interpreted as a personal pronoun i think. According to this one could substitute my German, which is a bit more precise.

Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:48 am
@helmi15,
helmi15 wrote:

I would use gut instead of super. Super would mean that your German is not yet superior.


Is there generally less irony in German conversation/culture, or does it just show up in different places?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:55 am
@helmi15,
helmi15 wrote:

If you use "es", this word can be interpreted as a personal pronoun i think.
It's a demonstrative (Demonstrativpronomen, "hinweisendes F├╝rwort").
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