22
   

Days of the Twinkie may be numbered

 
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 13 Dec, 2012 09:43 pm
@hawkeye10,
The major players seem to be Walmart, Kroger and Bimbo. I very much want to know which brands Bimbo wants and if they intend to move a lot of the production to Mexico, and where Walmart/Kroger intend to manufacture. Perhaps some of the plants will have life yet.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 14 Dec, 2012 01:04 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Kroger, which operates a chain of 2,425 supermarkets and multidepartment stores in 31 states, also owns nine bakeries, which advances the idea that the Cincinnati retailer could be a sound candidate for buying the brands, Lotman says. He notes Kroger could actually insert the brands into a current infrastructure that includes 37 food-processing plants and sell them in the 788 convenience stores and 1,124 supermarkets it operates throughout the U.S.

Read more: Sugar rush: Hostess auction looks sweeter - The Deal Pipeline (SAMPLE CONTENT: NEED AN ID?) http://www.thedeal.com/content/restructuring/sugar-rush-hostess-auction-looks-sweeter.php#ixzz2F0W3Ru9y



very interesting! They then would not want any of the run down Hostess factories, or any of the ex Hostess workers.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Dec, 2012 04:39 am
@hawkeye10,
unless they didnt give a **** about good will.(My feeling is that many "comfort" products develop a following that is fairly loyal)
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  4  
Reply Fri 14 Dec, 2012 11:11 am
http://www.alternet.org/corporate-accountability-and-workplace/twinkie-ceo-admits-company-took-employees-pensions-and-put-it

Here's an article detailing exactly how the management of Hostess (the newest group, I should say, brought in after the last hedge fund bought them) stole the pensions of the workers. Explicitly stole them. And used the money to pay themselves millions of dollars, while dropping responsibility for paying out the pensions on the taxpayer.

Anyone who thinks the unions killed this company is a goddamn fool

Cycloptichorn
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 29 Dec, 2012 04:55 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
I just had a Friendly's Foods made cupcake, patterned off of the Ding Dong......WOW!, making so much fat and sugar taste that bad is a skill.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jan, 2013 09:02 am
funny, i found some comic books from the mid 70's on the net, most of the scans include the ads, and just about every issue has some superhero saving the world from invasion by offering the villains Hostess products

if they disappear for ever, the Mayans might just be right, 2012, was the beginning of the end
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sun 13 Jan, 2013 02:28 am
Quote:
Flowers Foods Inc on Friday said it has agreed to buy Wonder and other well-known bread brands from Hostess Brands Inc for $390 million, as part of the latter company's bankruptcy reorganization.

The Thomasville, Ga.-based company said it agreed to pay $360 million for the Wonder, Butternut, Home Pride, Merita and Nature's Pride brands, as well as 20 bakeries and 38 depots.

It also entered a second contract where it agreed to pay $30 million for the Beefsteak brand

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/flowers-foods-buy-some-hostess-brands-390-million-1B7946786

very curious that flowers is willing to pay this much, and that they want 20 plants. hostess management might end up looking like geniuses for ending operations at this rate.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2013 07:50 pm
Pabst Blue Ribbon Is Really Maybe Buying Twinkies
http://newyork.grubstreet.com/2013/01/pabst-blue-ribbon-is-buying-twinkies.html?mid=grubstreet--20130124
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2013 10:56 pm
@tsarstepan,
I dont buy it, as this is no turn-key proposition. The only management available to plug in here is the thin and failed Hostess team, and the only bakeries ready to go are the leftovers that flowers did not want....which I think are mostly in the South. If long distribution chains worked for baked goods Bimbo would be paying more and making them in Mexico with cheap sugar, and a solid management team.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 31 Jan, 2013 12:02 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
(Reuters) - Hostess Brands Inc said private equity firms Apollo Global Management LLC and C. Dean Metropoulos & Co have set a baseline offer of $410 million to buy the company's snack cake brands including Hostess Twinkies and Dolly Madison.

The so-called stalking horse bid by the private equity firms, working together to buy the 82-year-old baker, would serve as the minimum offer for the business, which could still be topped by others.

Apollo and Metropoulos have agreed to purchase the brands, five bakeries and certain equipment.

The agreement does not require Apollo and Metropoulos to assume any of Hostess Snacks' liabilities or other obligations.

Apollo, founded by banker Leon Black, has previously invested in consumer companies, including CKE Restaurants and Claire's Stores Inc.

"We believe the Hostess Snacks brands we agreed to acquire offer significant potential for renewed growth and expansion into additional channels of distribution," Andy Jhawar, head of Apollo's Consumer and Food Retail Industry Group, said in a statement.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/sns-rt-us-hostess-twinkiesbre90u03y-20130130,0,472606.story

interesting....after all the chatter about how the bread business was nearly worthless it looks to sell for as much as the cake business. also, the bread business goes to people who will know what to do with it and almost all of the cake business goes to people who have no clue.

I am shocked that almost 3/4 of the bakeries look to operate again.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Mar, 2013 09:07 am

all is right with the world...

Quote:
Hostess Sells Twinkies Brand to Investment Firms

Twinkies and Ding Dongs are back from the dead.

Hostess Brands, the now bankrupt owner of the cream-filled confections, agreed on
Tuesday to sell the snacks — along with Ho Hos, Sno Balls and Dolly Madison Zingers —
to two investment firms with a shared history of corporate turnarounds.

The deal, worth $410 million, was struck nearly four months after the last Twinkie
rolled off the baking lines.

When Hostess, unable to reach a deal with its bakers’ union, announced in November
that it would wind down operations, it set off waves of nostalgia for a symbol of American
junk food. As recently as Tuesday, sellers on eBay were seeking to fetch as much as
$250,000 for two boxes of Twinkies.

The sale will mean that Twinkies, born more than 83 years ago in an Illinois industrial
kitchen, will live on, having survived wars, recessions and the South Beach and Dukan diets.
(NYT)
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 30 Jun, 2013 01:33 pm
When Hostess Twinkies return to store shelves next month, they'll epitomize one of branding’s rarest feats: a return from the dead. But while the snack’s resurgence (courtesy of a $410 million fire-sale buyout by Apollo Global Management) will doubtless make snack hounds happy, the legendary brand still has its work cut out for it. Indeed, according to observers, after the hoopla fades, Twinkies may well face a kind of branding Catch-22. Hardcore fans aren’t enough in number to sustain the snack food in perpetuity, while its troublesome nutrition label (220 mg of sodium in one cake?) may well be a hard sell for younger, health-conscious buyers. So while today’s story is that Twinkies are back, tomorrow’s may well be: How long will they stay?
"The biggest obstacle is that Twinkies are not exactly a good candidate for a millennial consumer," said Stuart Leslie, president of brand design and innovation firm 4sight Inc. "Meanwhile, their nostalgic consumer demographic is getting old and health conscious. It's going to be a tough sell."
Of course, there's no question that Twinkies have a devoted following—a big one. When labor troubles plunged Hostess into bankruptcy last November, unplugging the ovens that had been baking the "Golden Sponge Cake With Creamy Filling" since 1930, legions of hardcore fans howled in disbelief, some of them even launching a "Save the Twinkie" Facebook page. “We love our Twinkies and, though I’m not sure why, it is a solid relationship,” said Steve Ettlinger, whose 2007 book Twinkie Deconstructed scrutinized the Twinkie’s 37 oft-baffling ingredients (anyone know what sodium acid pyrophosphate is?). “There’s nostalgia, sex and loyalty all wrapped up in that plastic cover,” Ettlinger said.
Yep, and they taste good, too. Which is why Hostess is obviously betting on nostalgia to carry the day—at least for now. Everything about the resurgent Twinkies (box design, cake recipe, even the $3.99 price tag) will be exactly like before. "The decision to keep the packaging and product consistent with what [the] consumer loved was an obvious one," said Dave Lubeck, vp of Bernstein-Rein, the advertising agency of record that Hostess announced just yesterday. "There was no question that consumers wanted the product they knew and loved back."
But now that the Twinkie is back, some marketers say it has its work cut out for it. While Twinkies purportedly sold 500 million cakes annually and were absent from stores for less than a year, that was enough time for pretender brands including Cloud Cakes, Dreamies and Bingles to bite off some of Twinkies' market share. "As a brand, one thing you don’t want is your customers trying alternatives," said Allen Adamson, managing director of marketing consultancy Landor’s New York office. "They might say, 'If I can’t see or taste the difference, why am I paying the difference?’" Adamson added that Twinkies’ real challenge won’t be winning back “old friends,” but “figuring out how to make it fun and get younger consumers to connect.”
Bernstein-Rein is quite aware of this fact, planning some sweeping changes in Twinkieland. Starting with a new tagline on the box, "The sweetest comeback in the history of ever," Lubeck promises that his agency will "leverage the nostalgia associated with the Hostess brand and, at the same time, reintroduce it with a voice that's more contemporary and an attitude that’s bolder and more relevant to today’s consumers." What’s that mean? A full array of digital, social media, guerrilla and traditional advertising efforts, including a Vine video-sharing effort built on the theme of “Prepare Your Cakeface.”
Perhaps the most ambitious, millennial-molded idea is to make Twinkies healthy—or, well, a little less like munching on the periodic table. Daren Metropoulos, principal of Metropoulos & Co., one of Hostess' new co-owners, recently told the AP that low-sugar, gluten-free and low-sodium varieties of Twinkies are under consideration. That would be ambitious change, yet even here Hostess must proceed carefully, according to Josh Cohen, CEO of interactive marketing firm Pearl Media. "If we look at brand history with, say, the New Coke debacle, people across America were shouting, 'Don’t mess with the taste of my soft drink.’ Certainly, the same principle applies to Twinkies’ reintroduction."
Buddy Ketchner, president of brand strategy firm Sterling-Rice Group, agrees. "Twinkies fans, who cleared the shelves completely when they heard the products were being discontinued, will be expecting the original and will be extra sensitive to any change to the product." At the same time, he said, Twinkies would do well to rip a page from Oreo's playbook, which has found a way to keep the century-old cookie largely intact while also offering variations that keep things interesting. "Holiday-colored cream-filled ones, Twinkie ice cream, mini Twinkies in cup-holder packages, co-branded flavors—the possibilities are endless," Ketchner said.
For the time being, then, Twinkies can bask in the glow of having made a rare and heroic comeback—but industry pros will be carefully watching the brand's next moves. Of one thing, all seem agreed: While the famous sponge cake has a strong market position, its true golden age probably lay back in the days when nobody cared what polysorbate 60 was. "It’s hard to imagine an 'improved’ Twinkie in any event," Leslie said. "It doesn’t have the credibility. It’s the poster child for unhealthy food." Added Ettlinger: “I suspect that the new ones will never sell as well as the old ones.” Adamson agreed: “Twinkies aren’t going to get the same share they had on the day they left,” he said. “They can’t go back to the future.”
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Jul, 2013 09:16 pm
Twinkies To Return To Shelves July 15, Hostess Says
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Jul, 2013 09:56 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

...younger, health-conscious buyers...

Younger buyers are health conscious???
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Jul, 2013 10:52 pm
@Brandon9000,
Brandon9000 wrote:

edgarblythe wrote:

...younger, health-conscious buyers...

Younger buyers are health conscious???

that is what I was reading in an article on McDonald's which claimed that millennials dont think much of the brand because they want more healthy food. I was thinking "what? arn't these the fattest generation of adult yet?....isnt the young wanting "bad" food the reason that food choices in schools are newly regulated on par with prescription drugs?"
Brandon9000
 
  0  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2013 04:32 am
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Brandon9000 wrote:

edgarblythe wrote:

...younger, health-conscious buyers...

Younger buyers are health conscious???

that is what I was reading in an article on McDonald's which claimed that millennials dont think much of the brand because they want more healthy food. I was thinking "what? arn't these the fattest generation of adult yet?....isnt the young wanting "bad" food the reason that food choices in schools are newly regulated on par with prescription drugs?"

I work with a bunch of guys in their 20s and early 30s and I see no evidence that they seek healthy food. Baby boomers are fat because their metabolisms have changed, usually not because their eating habits are worse than anyone else's.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2013 04:39 am
@Brandon9000,
You're absolutely right. When you get past 30, your body is done growing. You need to seriously modify your dietary habits if you want to stay trim.

Of course, if that's not your goal . . . pass that bag of chips, please.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2013 05:23 am
I could never touch another Twinkie without regret, as long as I live. But when they are there I will occasionally, like twice a year, have them.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jul, 2013 04:56 am
Monday I think is the day they return.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 01:48 pm
Walmart cheated (I am shocked) and got theirs already.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Twinkies in Costa Rica ? - Question by mitmont
Before it's too ;late - Discussion by dalehileman
Twinkie Burritos? Twinkie Lasagna? - Discussion by Reyn
Twinkies and Tang... - Discussion by Region Philbis
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 07/04/2022 at 03:32:13