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What does it mean when a kid is a "ward of the state"?

 
 
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 01:44 pm
Like, what does ward of the state mean? I'd never heard of the before... and how do you become a ward of the state?
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 9,850 • Replies: 12
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Ragman
 
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Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 01:46 pm
@GracieGirl,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_(law)

In law, a ward is someone placed under the protection of a legal guardian. A court may take responsibility for the legal protection of an individual, usually either a child or incapacitated person, in which case the ward is known as a ward of the court, or a ward of the state.
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djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 01:55 pm
i'd rather be a ward of bruce wayne

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/67/BatmanRobin.jpg
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Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 01:57 pm
@GracieGirl,
It means that a child has been removed frm the custody of his/her parents/guardians (for whatever reason) and is now being cared for by a state agency for the protection of children.
GracieGirl
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 04:51 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
A state agency for the protection of children? Is that a fancy way of saying CPS or something?

And does that only work if you've been removed from your parents/guardians? Does it work for orphans too?

Like, for instance, if something happened to my dad, me and my sister and brother would be "wards of the state"?
Lustig Andrei
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Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 04:55 pm
@GracieGirl,
GracieGirl wrote:

A state agency for the protection of children? Is that a fancy way of saying CPS or something?

And does that only work if you've been removed from your parents/guardians? Does it work for orphans too?

Like, for instance, if something happened to my dad, me and my sister and brother would be "wards of the state"?



Yah, CPS is just the acronym for one specific agency. Depending on the state you're in, the letters could be entirely different because the agency could be known by some other name. That's why I said "agency for the protection of children." It could be just the local family court. And, yes, orphans frequently become wards of the state if there is no other family member (aunt, uncle, grandparent etc.) to step forward to take care of the kids.
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 05:03 pm
@GracieGirl,
Of course, if something happened to your dad, you have an aunt or relative that would take care of you all, right? I'm sure he has a will and has that all spelled out.
GracieGirl
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 05:47 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Okay thanks! I get it now. Smile

But one more question. If a agency takes care of them, what happens to them? Like, how does the agency take care of them? Drop them off at a group/ foster home?
GracieGirl
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 06:00 pm
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:

Of course, if something happened to your dad, you have an aunt or relative that would take care of you all, right?


Of course! My dad talked to us about this a long time ago when it was just the four of us. He said if something ever happened to him we'd be okay and he'd want us to live with our Aunt Jess.

Ragman wrote:

I'm sure he has a will and has that all spelled out.


Um, I guess. He's never mentioned a will before, but yeah, he probably has one.
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Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 06:03 pm
@GracieGirl,
If there is no family member who volunteers to take them in, then they usually will be put in a group home or in foster care. The ultimate aim (depending on the kids' age) is to get a family to legally adopt them and raise them as their own.
GracieGirl
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 06:26 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Well that sucks. From what I hear most group homes (at least in California) are terrible.

Thanks again.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 06:31 pm
@GracieGirl,
not just in California, gracie.

it's a hard way to grow up for sure...
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2012 06:31 pm
@GracieGirl,
I'm a little cynical about group and foster homes, myself, though there are probably some good ones.

Not to make anyone nervous, but despite father's express wishes, it is likely that that aunt will still have to go through the guardianship process. Should be a shoo in, but I'm sure the court will have to approve the process. I'm also pretty sure that with your dad being a lawyer, he's covered as many bases as possible.
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