6
   

Why does a full moon make tides higher?

 
 
dlowan
 
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 02:20 am
The mass of the moon is the mass of the moon. The light of the sun shining fully upon it can't increase the mass.

I know I knew this when I was a kid, but I've forgotten!
 
View best answer, chosen by dlowan
raprap
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 02:33 am
@dlowan,
For the moon to be full the Earth has to be roughly between the moon abd the sun. The gravitational pull of the moon and the sun is combined in the same linear direction causing the effects on the water in the oceans (tides) to be greater.

A similar condition occurs at new moons when the sun and the moon are in a line on one side of the Earth.

Rap
laughoutlood
 
  3  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 02:51 am
@dlowan,
the gravitas of this question is astrocomical
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 03:00 am
@raprap,
Ah cool.....thank you!
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 03:01 am
@laughoutlood,
laughoutlood wrote:

the gravitas of this question is astrocomical


Isn't.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 03:31 am
Great quip there, Laughoutloud.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 03:53 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Great quip there, Laughoutloud.


She who laughs last laughs loudest.

Twas a sublunary quip......
0 Replies
 
laughoutlood
 
  2  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 03:53 am
@Setanta,
ur as ever 2kind, get sirius, utter lunacy i say, shazzam deborah

Quote:
In the lunar month, the highest tides occur roughly every 14 days, at the new and full moons, when the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun are in alignment.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_tide
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 03:56 am
Which reminds me--the Royal Navy always paid their officers according to the lunar year. Was that perhaps because the Admiralty were all loony? Which would, of course, be a bird of a different feather.
laughoutlood
 
  2  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 03:58 am
@Setanta,
Now you're shilling.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 04:21 am
Oh, go pound salt.
laughoutlood
 
  2  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2012 05:59 am
@Setanta,


not without my rap sheet
0 Replies
 
gollum
 
  0  
Reply Sun 24 Jan, 2016 05:16 pm
@raprap,
raprap-

Would the moon's gravitational force lift the water up? Would the sun's gravitational force push the water down?

When the sun and the moon are not in the same linear line, is the water pulled at an angle?
layman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jan, 2016 08:40 pm
@gollum,
There are a lot of pictures, with captions, at this site which helps you visualize it. On one side or the earth the moon's gravity raises the tide, on the other inertia (centrifugal force).

https://www.google.com/search?q=tides&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwio_efC98PKAhVG4SYKHXxsCigQsAQIHA&biw=1097&bih=499

0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

New Propulsion, the "EM Drive" - Question by TomTomBinks
The Science Thread - Discussion by Wilso
Why do people deny evolution? - Question by JimmyJ
Are we alone in the universe? - Discussion by Jpsy
Fake Science Journals - Discussion by rosborne979
Controvertial "Proof" of Multiverse! - Discussion by littlek
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Why does a full moon make tides higher?
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 08/12/2020 at 09:06:48