0
   

New POLL: Citizens of Florida SUPPORT STAND YOUR GROUND LAW

 
 
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 06:02 pm

When 28-year-old George Zimmerman killed Trayvon Martin
and argued the Stand Your Ground law, saying he was protecting himself,
the application of the law has come under question and scrutiny.
Despite the controversy, though, most Floridians say they think
the law shouldn't be changed.


According to a News 13 exclusive statewide poll,
64 percent of registered voters said they support the law
and even almost half of those who say they oppose it
add they would really just like to see it modified
.
Only 18 percent of those polled said they want to see the law repealed.


The law, which was passed in 2005,
says people are justified to use deadly force to defend themselves
if they reasonably believe that such force is necessary to prevent
imminent death, great bodily harm or to prevent the commission
of a forcible felony. A citizen has no duty to retreat and if it is
determined that their use of force was justified, they are immune
from criminal prosecution and civil action. The Stand Your Ground law
does not apply if the victim initially provokes the use of force
or if they are involved in a felony crime.


The law receives the least amount of support in southeast Florida
where only 55 percent support it and 27 percent want to see it repealed.


In Tampa Bay, voters generally want to keep the law either as it's written
or with some modification. 67 percent support it, 22 percent want it modified,
and only 10 percent want to see it thrown out
.


Central Florida shows similar numbers -- 65 percent support,
18 percent want it modified
and 14 percent want it repealed.


Tampa lawyer Joe Caimano is on the governor's task force for public safety
and is going around the state getting feedback from the public
about Stand Your Ground. He says he's not surprised that so many
people are in favor of it.


"Based on what I've seen in the past few months, the overwhelming
sentiment is everyone agrees we should be able to protect ourselves
when met with force
," Caimano said "but there are some people
that feel they are unclear as to what the Stand Your Ground element
of the statute is and whether or not that should be in the statute itself."


The poll showed a divide along racial lines with 38 percent of black
voters saying they want the law done away with and only 27 percent
supporting it as it is written.


For George Zimmerman, the argument was not an entirely successful one.
A special state prosecutor disagreed that the law was applicable to
his case and charged Zimmerman with second-degree murder.


Despite that, Floridians still say based on what they've heard about the case,
Zimmerman was defending himself under the law.


Forty-four percent of voters polled said they side with Zimmerman.
Another 40 percent say his actions could not be defended under the law
and 16 percent remain unsure.


Caimano said much of the criticism of the law that he's heard is
from people who have not read the law or do not understand it.
He said there's a lot of confusion, even among law enforcement
as to when it can be used legally.


He says as the law is written, it has been fair.


"My experience with the law has been that it will help people when
the facts should help them and when the law should help them,
and it doesn't apply and give immunity to people when it shouldn't,"
Caimano said.


Here again, race plays a big role in Zimmerman's defense.
About half of white and Hispanics, 50 percent and 52 percent respectively,
say he was justified.

Although more Hispanics say they're not sure, 25 percent compared
to only 15 percent of whites who aren't convinced either way but
among black voters, 82 percent said Zimmerman's actions do not fall
under the law.


Based on his experience on the task force so far, Caimano says three
things are needed: Education, Clarity and Fairness.


"I think it's supposed to help people who are in a place where they
are legally allowed to be and are not confronting people or the
initial aggressor of hostile situations," Caimano said.


He says before people criticize the law, they need to read the law
carefully and understand what it says, because, Caimano believes
some changes may be made, but this law is likely to be around for a long time.


QUESTION:
Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law states that people are justified
to use deadly force to defend themselves if they reasonably believe
that such force is necessary to prevent imminent death, great bodily
harm or to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. A citizen
has no duty to retreat and if it is determined that their use of force
was justified they are immune from criminal prosecution and civil action.

The “Stand Your Ground” law does not apply if the victim initially
provokes the use of force or if they are involved in a felony crime.

Do you support or oppose keeping Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law
as it is currently written?

[All emfasis has been added by David.]

  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,150 • Replies: 4
No top replies

 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jul, 2012 12:30 am
@OmSigDAVID,

That 's about 2 to 1 in favor of the freedom of the Stand Your Ground Law.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jul, 2012 04:54 am

I believe that this will be a good model
for other States to follow.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jul, 2012 05:10 am
@OmSigDAVID,
most people in the South were in favor of segregation too. So whats the point?

Because more people favor it, it must be good?


Have you forgotten all your stuff, inter alia, like legal training?
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jul, 2012 05:26 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

most people in the South were in favor of segregation too. So whats the point?

Because more people favor it, it must be good?
Because more people favor it,
it must be SUPPORTED BY DEMOCRACY.


farmerman wrote:
Have you forgotten all your stuff, inter alia, like legal training?
My point was that this sentiment will be manifest in voters at election time,
in SUPPORT of the freedom-loving legislators who enacted the bill and who leave it intact.
THEREFORE, those legislators shud be resolute in its defense n preservation intact.

I 'm at a loss to know Y u brought up my "legal training".





David
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » New POLL: Citizens of Florida SUPPORT STAND YOUR GROUND LAW
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 05/21/2019 at 03:32:24